Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query cbssm med umich edu people brian j zikmund fisher phd.

Page not found

You are here

Funded by the Alzheimer's Association

Active Year(s): 2008-2011

The goal of the MCI Risk Communication Study is to develop and evaluate a risk communication protocol to convey diagnostic and risk information to MCI patients and family members. A multi-step protocol will be created, taking into account principles of health risk communication, patient and provider preferences, and ethical issues involved in working with cognitively impaired populations. The protocol will be delivered by health care professionals with risk communication experience and tested on 10 patient/care-partner dyads recruited from Alzheimer’s Disease Centers at the University of Michigan and Boston University. The results of this pilot study will help inform the fourth trial of REVEAL.

PI: J. Scott Roberts, PhD

The University of Michigan Decision Consortium Conference is scheduled for Monday, May 16, in Room R0320, Ross School of Business, 700 Tappan Street.  Advance registration is required.  Contact Mary Mohrbach at mohrbach@umich.edu

Caring for an ailing spouse may prolong your life. Stephanie Brown explains her research in a vodcast, featured on the University of Michigan website:  http://www.ns.umich.edu/podcast/vodcast.php. This vodcast was, appropriately, the university's home page lead for the week of Thanksgiving.

Pediatric Ethics Committee

The Michigan Medicine Committee advisory groups are appointed by the Hospital's Office of Clinical Affairs. They review ethical or moral questions that may come up during a pediatrics patient's care. The consultants facilitate communication among patients, their families and the treatment team to assist everyone in making appropriate choices when difficult decisions need to be made. The Committee's goal is to help everyone decide the right thing to do. The Michigan Medicine Ethics Committee is a sub-committee of the Executive Committee on Clinical Affairs as determined by the Medical Staff Bylaws. 

About Us


The committee is available for consultation to family members, patients, staff, and health care providers. The committee may help you and your child’s medical team clarify facts, examine ethical issues, and assist in the resolution of disagreements about your child’s care. The committee includes people with additional training in medical ethics, doctors, nurses, social workers, a lawyer, a chaplain, an administrator, and members of the community
The University of Michigan has a Pediatric Ethics Committee because the best medical care requires not only medical skill but good moral judgment. The Committee’s main purpose is to offer help and guidance on moral and ethical questions, such as:

  • Should treatment be started or stopped?
  • How much should a child be told about his or her disease?
  • Is the promise of treatment worth the suffering it may cause?
  • What is the best thing to do when we must face the end of life?
  • What happens when a meeting with the Ethics Committee is requested?

The consultants on call review the patient's medical situation and treatment options. In addition, concerns and feelings of the patient, family members, and the health care team are discussed. Members of the committee may visit with patients, families and medical personnel to discuss these concerns.

Ethics Committee members discuss the information which has been gathered. The Ethics Committee makes suggestions about the best course of action. Often there are a number of options available in the course of a patient's care. Final decisions are made by the patient, family and the health care team.

The Pediatric Ethics Committee meets on the first Tuesday of the month from 12-1:30pm at University Hospital in dining rooms C&D. If you would like to attend as a guest, please contact Amy Lynn @ lynnam@med.umich.edu

Request a Consult

Monday-Friday
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Call 734-615-1379
After normal business hours, please call 936-6267 and ask for the clinical ethicist on call to be paged.

Resources

Financial Assistance

Non-Beneficial Treatment

Committee Bylaws

 

For upcoming Bioethics Grand Rounds see Events

 

Are you a numbers person? (Oct-07)

Many types of medical decisions involve making sense of numbers such as test results, risk statistics, or prognosis estimates. But people vary in their ability and confidence with numbers. How would you rate your own "numeracy"?

 

Not good at all

 

 

 

 

 

Extremely good

How good are you at working with fractions?

1

2

3

4

5

6

How good are you at working with percentages?

1

2

3

4

5

6

How good are you at calculating a 15% tip?

1

2

3

4

5

6

How good are you at figuring out how much a shirt will cost if it is 25% off?

1

2

3

4

5

6

 

Not at all helpful

 

 

 

 

Extremely helpful

When reading the newspaper, how helpful do you find tables and graphs that are parts of a story?

1

2

3

4

5

6

 

Always prefer words

 

 

 

 

Always prefer numbers

When people tell you the chance of something happening, do you prefer that they use words ("it rarely happens") or numbers ("there's a 1% chance")?

1

2

3

4

5

6

 

Always prefer percentages

 

 

 

 

Always prefer words

When you hear a weather forecast, do you prefer predictions using percentages (e.g., "there will be a 20% chance of rain today") or predictions using only words (e.g., "there is a small chance of rain today")

1

2

3

4

5

6

 

Never

 

 

 

 

Very often

How often do you find numerical information to be useful?

1

2

3

4

5

6

Why is it important for researchers to know how numerate you are?

When a doctor or health educator is trying to communicate complex statistical information to a patient, it's helpful to know how well the patient understands numbers. This is called numeracy-the ability to process basic probability and numerical concepts. People low in numeracy might want or need different types of explanations than people high in numeracy.

How is numeracy measured?

In the past, researchers have used surveys similar to math tests to evaluate the levels of numeracy of participants in research studies. These objective numeracy tests can be time-consuming to administer and are often seen by the participants as stressful and annoying. As an alternative, a CBDSM research team-including Angela Fagerlin, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Dylan Smith, Aleksandra Jankovic, and Peter Ubel-recently designed and tested an eight-item self-assessment tool, called the Subjective Numeracy Scale (SNS), to measure numeracy. As you saw when you completed the tool, four of the questions on the SNS measure people's beliefs about their skill in performing various mathematical operations, and four measure people's preferences about the presentation of numerical information. When the CBDSM team tested the SNS, they found that it was moderately correlated with objective numeracy tests. In a variety of risk communication and preference elicitation tasks, the SNS also predicted people's behavior almost as well as an objective numeracy test did. The advantage of the SNS is that it is quick to administer and is less stressful to participants than objective tests. In addition, only the SNS is recommended for phone or Internet administration. The researchers also found that study participants who completed the SNS were much more likely to answer all the numeracy questions and were much more likely to say that they would be willing to participate in an additional research study.

Are their broader implications?

Research has shown that many Americans, including highly educated individuals, have low levels of numeracy. Low numeracy has significant implications for people's health care, especially when it comes to understanding the risks and benefits of treatments. Although we may not easily change people's numeric ability, it may be possible to create health education materials that help patients with low numeracy skills. Several CBDSM researchers are have been pursuing this subject.

Read the articles:

Measuring numeracy without a math test: development of the subjective numeracy scale (SNS).
Fagerlin A, Zikmund-Fisher BJ, Ubel PA, Jankovic A, Derry HA, Smith DM. Medical Decision Making 2007;27(5):672-680.

Validation of the subjective numeracy scale (SNS): Effects of low numeracy on comprehension of risk communications and utility elicitations.
Zikmund-Fisher BJ, Smith DM, Ubel PA, Fagerlin A. Medical Decision Making 2007;27(5):663-671.

Making numbers matter: Present and future research in risk communication.
Fagerlin A, Ubel PA, Smith DM, Zikmund-Fisher BJ. American Journal of Health Behavior 2007;31(Suppl. 1):S47-S56.

 

 

CBSSM Seminar: Jill A. Fisher, PhD

Thu, March 26, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC 16-266C

Jill A. Fisher, PhD
Assistant Professor of Social Medicine
Center for Bioethics
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Check out this Risk Bites YouTube video co-presented by Brian Zikmund-Fisher entitled “What have feelings got to do with risk?

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, March 22, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Autumn Fiester, PhD, Division of Medical Ethics, Department of Medical Ethics & Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania

Title –  The “Difficult” Patient Reconceived: Learning the Skills of Mediators in Managing Challenging Clinical Encounters.

Abstract: Between 15%-60% of patients are considered “difficult” by their treating physicians.  Patient psychiatric pathology is the conventional explanation for why patients are deemed “difficult.” But the prevalence of the problem suggests the possibility of a less pathological cause.  I argue that the phenomenon can be better explained as responses sourced in conflicts related to healthcare delivery and that the solution to the “difficult patient” is to teach better conflict management skills to clinical providers.


Objectives:

1. Apply the mediator's concepts of "positions" and "interests" to patient-provider conflicts
2. Identity the moral emotions and explain their significance in managing the "difficult" patient
3. Learn seven maxims for diffusing conflict in clinical encounters

Available via live stream at: https://connect.umms.med.umich.edu/bioethics_3_22_17

Funded by the National Science Foundation

Funding years: 2010-2013

Increasingly people are communicating with one another through new media such as text messages exchanged via mobile devices. At the same time, survey response rates continue to drop. These phenomena are related to the extent that respondents only use mobile devices (21% of US households no longer have a landline phone) and frequently rely on modes other than voice, most notably text (which is certainly the norm among some subgroups in the US and increasingly among entire populations in other countries). Yet we know little about the impact of multimodal mobile devices on survey participation, completion, data quality and respondent satisfaction.

The proposed research will explore these issues in two experiments that will collect survey data on iPhones in four modes defined by whether the interviewing agent is a live human or a computer, and whether the medium of communication is voice or text. The resulting modes are telephone interviews, instant message (IM) interviews, speech integrated voice response (IVR), and automated IM. This way of defining modes enables us to isolate the effects of the agent and medium. The first experiment explores the effect of the four modes on participation, completion, data quality and satisfaction; the second explores the impact on the same four measures of allowing participants to choose the response mode.

More information: http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/research/project-detail/34963

PI: Kathryn Moseley

Co-I: Mick Couper

Sarah Hawley, PhD, MPH

Faculty

Dr. Sarah T. Hawley is a Professor in the Division of General Medicine at the University of Michigan and a Research Investigator at the Ann Arbor VA Center of Excellence in Health Services Research & Development. She holds a PhD in health services research from the University of North Carolina and an MPH from Yale University Department of Public Health. Her primary research is in decision making related to cancer prevention and control, particularly among racial/ethnic minority and underserved populations.

Last Name: 
Hawley

Pages