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Emily Chen, MA

Research Associate

Emily Chen joined CBSSM in February 2016 and works with Drs. Julie Wright and Darin Zahuranec on several grant funded research projects on developing decision aids and family perspectives in decision making. Prior to moving to Michigan, Emily worked on several studies regarding mindfulness and cognitive styles at Harvard University. Emily received her BS in Atmospheric Science and a certificate in Neurobiology and Cognitive Science from National Taiwan University. She went on to receive her MA in Psychology from Boston University.

Last Name: 
Chen

Salomeh Michelle Salari, MS

Fellow

Sally is a fourth year medical student at the University of Michigan with the intent of specializing in Obstetrics and Gynecology. She is a member of the "Pathway of Excellence" ethics co-curricular program and is the CBSSM's second pre-doctoral clinical ethics fellow. Her interests include preventative ethics and moral distress, for which she is piloting "Moral Distress (MoD) Rounds" on non-intensive patient units at Mott Hospital.

Last Name: 
Salari

Funded by American Cancer Society.

Funding Years: 2014-2017.

The study will examine how informal decision supporters (e.g., partners, family, and friends) contribute decisions about surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy treatment, and how these roles may vary by race and ethnicity. The project will utilize existing resources from the Cancer Surveillance and Outcomes Research Team's (CanSORT) Program Project Grant "The Challenge of Individualizing Treatments for Patients with Breast Cancer," a $13 million award received from NCI in 2012.

PI(s): Sarah Hawley

Co-I(s): Jennifer Griggs, Nancy Janz, Steven Katz, Yun Li

 

Funded by the American Cancer Society

Funding Years: 2006-2011

This study examines the impact of "status-assessing" email messages sent to individuals who decided to quit smoking and chose a date to quit. Participants receive email messages 3 and 5 weeks after their self selected quit dates, asking them to click on a URL link that matches their current smoking status (quit, tried but relapsed, never quit). Participants who click on a link receive information targeted to their current smoking status.

CHCR Link

PI: Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD

Elias Baumgarten, PhD

Faculty

Elias Baumgarten served on the philosophy faculty of the University of Michigan-Dearborn from 1972 to 2018. In addition to teaching Medical Ethics regularly, he taught a wide range of other courses including "Darwinism and Philosophy," "The Problem of Human Freedom," and "Ethics of War and Peace." He has served on the UMHS Pediatric Ethics Committee since 1986 and the Adult Ethics Committee since 1985. He was a member of the Executive Committee of the Medical Ethics Resource Network of Michigan from 2007 to 2012.

Last Name: 
Baumgarten
Sat, February 23, 2013

Susan Goold was quoted in a recent Associated Press article: Some Patients Won't See Nurses of Different Race."
"In general, I don't think honoring prejudicial preferences ... is morally justifiable" for a health care organization, said Dr. Susan Goold, a University of Michigan professor of internal medicine and public health. "That said, you can't cure bigotry ... There may be times when grudgingly acceding to a patient's strongly held preferences is morally OK."

Fri, February 21, 2014

Dr. Reshma Jagsi was involved with a study that reported an increase in women who recieved breast reconstruction following a masectomy for breast cancer. The study found that, "46 percent of patients received reconstruction in 1998 but that figure rose to 63 percent by 2007." Jagsi said, "Breast reconstruction has a big impact on quality of life for breast cancer survivors. As we are seeing more women survive breast cancer, we need to focus on long term survivorship issues and ensuring that women have access to this important part of treatment."

Thu, August 14, 2014

Tarini and her colleagues studied parent attitudes about using newborn screening samples for research. The research, published in 2009, found that if permission is obtained, 76.2% of parents were ‘very or somewhat willing’ to permit use of the newborn screening sample for research. If permission is not obtained, only 28.2% of parents were ‘very or somewhat willing.’

The CBS story was about a new law that allows Minnesota health officials to indefinitely hold blood samples from newborn babies without parental consent.

Research Topics: 

Susan Dorr Goold, M.D., M.H.S.A., M.A., professor of Internal Medicine, and Health Management and Policy, was awarded a two-year, $391,000 grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to engage Michigan communities in deliberations about Medicaid priorities. Led by Goold and community partner Zachary Rowe, the project will engage communities in a priority setting exercise using the Choosing Health Plans All Together (CHAT) exercise. The award-winning CHAT tool provides structure, feedback and adaptability. It has a been used by multiple policy makers and community organizations, and a solid record of published research.

 

Mon, January 05, 2015

Reshma Jagsi was interviewed by mCancerTalk for the article, “Is your course of radiation treatment longer than it needs to be?” which focuses on two of her radiation treatment studies. In one of her studies, looking at a national database of patients, she and her colleagues found that hypofractionated radiation therapy was used in only 13.6% of Medicare patients with breast cancer. In Michigan, Jagsi’s other study found, fewer than one-third of patients who fit the criteria for offering this approach got the shorter course of treatment.

Read Dr. Jagsi’s paper about hypofractionation use nationally and in Michigan.

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