Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query cbssm med umich edu people andrew shuman md.

Page not found

You are here

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Sarah Hawley, Reshma Jagsi and others were recently published in a JAMA Oncology research letter on breast cancer patient risk communication. They found that medical oncologists were found to be far more likely than surgeons to quantify risk estimates for patients and that patients who do not see a medical oncologist may make treatment decisions, including surgery, without all relevant risk information.

For the full article: http://oncology.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2491464

 

Mon, October 19, 2015

Beth Tarini is lead author on study published in the Journal of Pediatrics that found that few primary care physicians say they would order genetic testing or refer a child to a genetics specialist as a first step when they see children with two or more developmental delays, despite the higher risk of genetic disorders in these children.

Brian Zikmund-Fisher and Wendy Uhlmann are also co-authors.

Citation:

Tarini, Beth A., Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, Howard M. Saal, Laurie Edmondson, and Wendy R. Uhlmann. "Primary Care Providers' Initial Evaluation of Children with Global Developmental Delay: A Clinical Vignette Study." The Journal of Pediatrics.

Research Topics: 

Raymond De Vries is involved in a new research study led by Akbar Waljee, MD, MSc, which will develop a risk-based strategy to help providers tailor timing of treatments among CHC Veterans to ensure that those who most need urgent therapy get it as quickly as possible.

Using democratic deliberation, Dr. De Vries will engage Veterans to learn their thoughts and preferences about such a strategy, which will help with its implementation in a clinical setting.

Click here for more details.

Fri, September 15, 2017

A study on surgeon influence on double mastectomy co-authored by Sarah Hawley and Reshma Jagsi was recently highlighted in Time Health.  This study found that attending surgeons exerted a substantial amount of influence on the likelihood of receipt of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy after a breast cancer diagnosis. Steven Katz was first author of this study.

Fri, December 15, 2017

In light of the #MeToo campaign denouncing sexual assault and harassment, Reshma Jagsi has written a perspective piece in the New England Journal of Medicine about sexual harrassment in academic medicine. Also check out her interview in MHealth Lab and several other articles citing her NEJM article.

Research Topics: 

Tom Valley was recently awarded an NIH/NHLBI K23 Career Development Award. Dr. Valley’s award seeks to prevent avoidable deaths from pneumonia by improving the use of the ICU. Each year, 10,000 Americans die from pneumonia, yet might not if they had received care in the ICU. With this award, Dr. Valley will receive training to become a decision scientist aiming to improve clinical decision-making in the ICU. His mentors for this award are Jack Iwashyna, Angie Fagerlin, and Colin Cooke.

Research Topics: 
Fri, July 26, 2013

Susan Goold is the senior author in a newly published study in JAMA, in which 2,500 U. S. physicians were asked about their views on 17 specific strategies to reduce health care spending, including proposed policies in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. They were also surveyed on their perceived roles and responsibilities in addressing health care costs as care providers.

The vast majority of U.S. physicians (85 percent) agreed that trying to contain costs was a responsibility of every physician but most respondents prioritized patients’ best interests over cost concerns. Most surveyed physicians supported cost-containment initiatives aimed at improving the quality and efficiency of care, such as promoting chronic disease care coordination and limiting corporate influence on physician behavior. Substantial financing reforms, however, were much less popular among physicians. Examples include bundled payments, penalties for readmissions, eliminating fee-for-service reimbursement and other Medicare pay cuts. Physicians also believed that patients, pharmaceutical companies, and malpractice lawyers shared as much or more of the responsibility for containing escalating healthcare costs.

Jon C. Tilburt, M.D., M.P.H., of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., was lead author of the study.

Tilburt JC, Wynia MK, Sheeler RD, Thorsteinsdottir B, James KM, Egginton JS, Liebow M, Hurst S, Danis M, Goold S (2013). Views of US Physicians About Controlling Health Care Costs. JAMA 310 (4): 380-388.

2014 Bishop Lecture featuring Myra Christopher

Thu, May 15, 2014 (All day)
Location: 
Vandenberg Meeting Hall (2nd floor), The Michigan Hall, 911 N. University, Ann Arbor, MI.

The CBSSM Research Colloquium featured the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as the keynote address.  Myra Christopher presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: "The Moral Imperative to Transform the Way Pain is Perceived, Judged and Treated".

Myra Christopher holds the Kathleen M. Foley Chair in Pain and Palliative Care at the Center for Practical Bioethics.  Prior to December 2011, Ms. 

Christopher was President and CEO of the Center for Practical Bioethics since its inception in 1984 through December 2011.  From 1998-2003, Christopher also served as the national program officer of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s National Program Office for State-based Initiatives to Improve End-of Life Care which was housed at the Center.  These roles have allowed Christopher to continue her lifelong mission to improve care for those who are seriously ill and their families.

Since the late 1990s, Christopher has expanded the scope of her work to include the under treatment of chronic pain.  She is currently the Director of the Pain Action Initiative: A National Strategy (PAINS) and serves as Chair of the PAINS Steering Committee. From 2010-2011 she served as a member of Pain Study Committee at the Institute of Medicine focused on the under-treatment of pain.  In 2012 she was appointed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sibelius, to the Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee (IPRCC) at the National Institutes of Health. In that capacity, she also serves on the Oversight Committee for the National Pain Strategy Task Force. 

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) Research Colloquium was held Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Vandenberg Meeting Hall (2nd floor), The Michigan League, 911 N. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

Funded by the NIH

In the past 30 years, the incidence of thyroid cancer has tripled. The majority of the rise in thyroid cancer incidence is attributed to an increase in low-risk, well-differentiated thyroid cancer, a disease that has a 10-year mortality close to zero. Our previous work suggests that patients with low-risk thyroid cancer are at risk for overtreatment, defined as the use of surgical and medical interventions in the absence of a clear survival benefit. The overtreatment of thyroid cancer has inherent costs, both to patient health and to society. The reason for the intensive management and potential overtreatment of low-risk thyroid cancer remains unclear. By using SEER-linked patient and physician surveys, we plan to understand the treatment decision making in low-risk thyroid cancer. We hypothesize that knowledge and attitudes influence decision making. Specifically, we anticipate that lack of knowledge of risks of death, recurrence and treatment complications is associated with treatment that is more intensive. In addition, we postulate that a general preference for active treatment will also be associated with more intensive cancer treatment. Although both patient and physician perceptions of treatment need (i.e., knowledge and attitudes) likely contribute to treatment intensity, we anticipate that the primary driver will be physicians, even after controlling for their patients' perceptions. This study will serve as the foundation for future intervention studies. By identifying the specific role of physician and patient knowledge and attitudes toward thyroid cancer treatment, we will be able to create tailored educational interventions to personalize surgical and medical care for thyroid cancer patients, thus minimizing overtreatment and its inherent risks and costs. As the rising incidence, low mortality, and pattern of intensive treatment make thyroid cancer arguably the best cancer model for overtreatment, this proposed study will also serve as a model to understand overtreatment in other malignancies. For more info: http://grantome.com/grant/NIH/R01-CA201198-01A1

PI: Megan Haymart

CBSSM Co-Is: Sarah Hawley & Brian Zikmund-Fisher

Wendy Uhlmann, MS, CGC

Faculty

Wendy R. Uhlmann, MS, CGC is the genetic counselor/clinic coordinator of the Medical Genetics Clinic at the University of Michigan. She is a Clinical Professor in the Departments of Internal Medicine and Human Genetics and an executive faculty member of the genetic counseling training program. Wendy Uhlmann is a Past President of the National Society of Genetic Counselors and previously served on the Board of Directors of the Genetic Alliance and as NSGC’s liaison to the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research.

Last Name: 
Uhlmann

Pages