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Fri, February 21, 2014

Dr. Reshma Jagsi was involved with a study that reported an increase in women who recieved breast reconstruction following a masectomy for breast cancer. The study found that, "46 percent of patients received reconstruction in 1998 but that figure rose to 63 percent by 2007." Jagsi said, "Breast reconstruction has a big impact on quality of life for breast cancer survivors. As we are seeing more women survive breast cancer, we need to focus on long term survivorship issues and ensuring that women have access to this important part of treatment."

Thu, August 14, 2014

Tarini and her colleagues studied parent attitudes about using newborn screening samples for research. The research, published in 2009, found that if permission is obtained, 76.2% of parents were ‘very or somewhat willing’ to permit use of the newborn screening sample for research. If permission is not obtained, only 28.2% of parents were ‘very or somewhat willing.’

The CBS story was about a new law that allows Minnesota health officials to indefinitely hold blood samples from newborn babies without parental consent.

Research Topics: 

Susan Dorr Goold, M.D., M.H.S.A., M.A., professor of Internal Medicine, and Health Management and Policy, was awarded a two-year, $391,000 grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to engage Michigan communities in deliberations about Medicaid priorities. Led by Goold and community partner Zachary Rowe, the project will engage communities in a priority setting exercise using the Choosing Health Plans All Together (CHAT) exercise. The award-winning CHAT tool provides structure, feedback and adaptability. It has a been used by multiple policy makers and community organizations, and a solid record of published research.

 

Mon, January 05, 2015

Reshma Jagsi was interviewed by mCancerTalk for the article, “Is your course of radiation treatment longer than it needs to be?” which focuses on two of her radiation treatment studies. In one of her studies, looking at a national database of patients, she and her colleagues found that hypofractionated radiation therapy was used in only 13.6% of Medicare patients with breast cancer. In Michigan, Jagsi’s other study found, fewer than one-third of patients who fit the criteria for offering this approach got the shorter course of treatment.

Read Dr. Jagsi’s paper about hypofractionation use nationally and in Michigan.

Fri, April 10, 2015

Dr. Jagsi was interviewed by MedicalResearch.com, discussing her study which finds many breast cancer patients have an unmet need to discuss genetic testing with their healthcare provider. The study found that 35 percent of women with breast cancer expressed a strong desire for genetic testing, but 43 percent of those women did not have a relevant discussion with a healthcare professional. "By more routinely addressing genetic risk with patients, we can better inform them of their true risk of cancer returning or of developing a new cancer," Dr. Jagsi explains in the interview. "This could potentially alleviate worry and reduce confusion about cancer risk."

"Still Alice" Film Screening & Moderated Discussion

Thu, October 15, 2015, 7:00pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Forum Hall, Palmer Commons

"Still Alice" Film Screening & Moderated Discussion

Free Admission

Moderator:    Raymond De Vries, PhD

Panelists:     Nancy Barbas, MD
                  J. Scott Roberts, PhD

Refreshments provided.

Based on Lisa Genova’s bestselling novel. In an Oscar winning performance, Julianne Moore plays Alice Howland, a renowned neurolinguistics professor at Columbia University who is diagnosed with familial, early onset Alzheimer’s Disease. The film provides insight into the patient’s perspective and the challenges patients, families, and caregivers face. The film also raises important bioethical questions related to patient autonomy, genetic testing, and personhood in the face of dementia.

Geoffrey Barnes is lead author on study published in the American Journal of Medicine finding new anticoagulants are driving increase in atrial fibrillation treatment and reducing warfarin therapy use.

“The data provides a promising outlook about atrial fibrillation which is known for being undertreated,” says lead author Geoffrey Barnes, M.D., MSc.,  cardiologist at the University of Michigan Health System and researcher at the Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.  “When we don’t treat atrial fibrillation, patients are at risk for stroke. By seeking treatment, patients set themselves up for better outcomes.”

More details can be found here.

Thu, September 10, 2015

Beth Tarini, associate professor of pediatrics and communicable diseases, is launching a study to see whether the martial art of tae kwon do could be an effective therapy - or even an alternative to prescription medication - for kids with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Dr. Tarini is working with Master Dan Vigil on the “Martials Arts as ADD/ADHD Treatment Trial (aka the MAAT Trial)”

She is using the online crowdfunding site Crowdrise to raise money  for the research.
 

Research Topics: 

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, June 22, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Timothy Johnson, MD

"Ethical global health engagement: the Michigan Women's Health Model"

Millennial learners are experiencing and want to engage in global issues.  As institutions develop opportunities for their students, ethical issues need to be considered.  Transnational, transcultural, and translational issues as well as issues of equity, bilateral gain, economic transparency, academic values and sustainability must be factored into academic institutional partnerships between Western and low income countries.  The Ghana experience will be used to develop the concept of a “Michigan Model”.

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, July 27, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Kunal Bailoor, MD Candidate Class of 2018, Ethics Path of Excellence

"Advance Care Planning: Beyond Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA)"

Abstract: Advance care planning is a crucial part of end of life medical care. It can take many forms, including designation of a surrogate decision maker via a DPOA document. However it can also involve living wills, physicians orders for life sustaining treatment (POLSTs), or even simply clinician patient conversation. The newly revised hospital policy on advance directives reflects this broader approach. The talk will include a brief review of the philosophical and ethical basis of advance care planning before diving into a discussion of the new hospital policy and it's impact on practice.

 

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