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Cited in C.S. Mott’s Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Physician’s Brief, recent research led by CBSSM’s Naomi Laventhal and Stephanie Kukora examines the role and accuracy of antenatal counseling in supporting shared decision making for complicated pregnancies, particularly those with a poor prognosis.

Other articles by Naomi Laventhal in the Journal of Pediatrics, the Journal of Perinatology, and Pediatric Cardiology are also cited.

Click here for more details.

Dr. Jason Karlawish, Professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania, will discuss his forthcoming novel, "Open Wound: The Tragic Obsession of Dr. William Beaumont" on Thursday, October 20, 3-5 pm, at the Biomedical Research Science Building (BSRB), Room 1130.  "Open Wound" is a fictional account of true events along the early 19th century American frontier, tracing the relationship between Dr. William Beaumont and his illiterate French Canadian patient.  The young trapper sustains an injury that never heals, leaving a hole in his stomach that the curious doctor uses as a window both to understand the mysteries of digestion and to advance his career.  A reception will follow the talk, and books will be available for purchase on site from Nicola's Books.  The event is co-sponsored by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, the Center for the History of Medicine, and the University of Michigan Press.  Click here for more information about the book. 

Tue, September 20, 2011

The CBS News website recently featured 10 tips to make better decisions about cancer care from U-M’s Angela Fagerlin, Ph.D., associate professor of internal medicine. Below is an excerpt from the article:

Cancer is scary, and doctors sometimes sound as if they’re speaking a foreign language when talking about the disease and its treatment. But “people are making life and death decisions that may affect their survival and they need to know what they’re getting themselves into,” says Fagerlin “Cancer treatments and tests can be serious. Patients need to know what kind of side effects they might experience as a result of the treatment they undergo.”

 

Thu, September 11, 2014

NOVA (on PBS) broadcasted a special episode on vaccines. Brian Zikmund-Fisher was interviewed and prominently featured. Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago-whooping cough, measles, mumps-are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children's shots. Amid the return of vaccine-preventable diseases, NOVA examined the science of immunization, tracked outbreaks, and shed light on the risks of opting out.

The program premired Wednesday, September 10, 2014 at 9 pm/8c on PBS. Watch the full program here.

You can read the press release here.

Research Topics: 

Reshma Jagsi will be a Keynote Speaker at “Strategies to Empower Women to Achieve Academic Success," which will be held June 7th (8:30 a.m. – 11 a.m., A. Alfred Taubman Biomedical Science Research Building). The event is sponsored by the A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute.

Click here for more details.

Research Topics: 

2013 Bishop Lecture featuring Ruth Macklin, PhD

Wed, April 17, 2013 (All day)

The Bishop Lecture in Bioethics served as the keynote address for 2013 CBSSM Research Colloquium. The Bishop Lecture is an endowed lectureship made possible by a gift from the estate of Ronald C. and Nancy V. Bishop.  Ruth Macklin, PhD, Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health and Dr. Shoshanah Trachtenberg Frackman Faculty Scholar in Biomedical Ethics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, will present the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled, “Global Gender Justice:  Violence against women; whose responsibility?”

Keynote Abstract: In some countries, governmental authorities have done little to prevent or punish violence against women.  Examples of gender-based violence include not only intimate partner violence, but also rape as a weapon of war, civilian rape, and killing condoned in so-called "honor cultures."  Can a theory of global justice shed light on whether external governments or non-governmental groups should take responsibility for remedying the situation?  Who has the responsibility to respond to human rights violations?

The Bishop Lecture in Bioethics was jointly sponsored by the Bishop Lectureship in Bioethics fund and by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM). 

  • Click here for the video recording of the 2013 Bishop Lecture.
Fri, October 27, 2017

An older Behavioral Economics study by Brian Zikmund-Fisher and Andrew Parker was recently highlighted in a Nerdwallet Blog about the continued demand for rent-to-own contracts.

Research Topics: 

Kathryn Moseley, MD, MPH

Peter A. Ubel, MD

Alumni

Peter Ubel, MD, is a physician and behavioral scientist whose research and writing explores the quirks in human nature that influence people's lives — the mixture of rational and irrational forces that affect health, happiness and the way society functions.

Dr. Ubel is Professor of Marketing and Public Policy at Duke University. He was Professor of Medicine and Psychology at the University of Michigan, where he taught from 2000 to 2010, and from 2005-2010, served as the Director of the Center for Behavioral and Decision Sciences in Medicine.

Last Name: 
Ubel

Erica Sutton, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Erica Sutton was a CBSSM Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2013-2015. She is an interdisciplinary social scientist engaged in social and behavioral science research that explores the health care experiences of individuals living with rare genetic conditions; the manner in which biotechnologies shape personal experience and social life; and the ethical implications of these technologies for individuals, public health, social policy, health care institutions, and communities.

Last Name: 
Sutton

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