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Funded by the NIH

The overarching goal of our research is to improve opioid analgesic safety and efficacy by optimizing opioid risk recognition, informed analgesic decision-making, and drug storage/disposal behaviors among parents of youth who are prescribed these agents for home use. With this proposal, we aim to demonstrate that our Scenario-Tailored Opioid Messaging Program (STOMP?) will: 1) Improve parents' opioid risk understanding and their analgesic decision-making; 2) Enhance parents' analgesic self-efficacy, analgesic use, storage behaviors and their children's pain outcomes, and 3) To demonstrate that the STOMP? plus provision of a method to get rid of left-over medications will effectively nudge parents to safely dispose of left-over opioid analgesics. For more info: http://grantome.com/grant/NIH/R01-DA044245-01A1

PI: Terri Lewis-Voepel

CBSSM Co-Is: Brian Zikmund-Fisher & Alan Tait

Interactive Decision

At CBSSM, we perform the basic and applied scientific research that will improve health care policy and practice to benefit patients and their families, health care providers, third-party payers, policy makers, and the general public.  In our "Interactive Decision" web feature, we turn a recent research finding into an interactive decision that a patient or policy maker might face.  Read, decide, click—and see how your answers compare with our respondents.

Impact of the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System on Vaccine Acceptance and Trust (Aug-17)

Patient understanding of blood test results (Feb-17)

Attitudes toward Return of Secondary Results in Genomic Sequencing (Sep-16)

Moral concerns and the willingness to donate to a research biobank (Jun-16)

Liver Transplant Organ Quality Decision Aid: Would you consider a less than perfect liver? (Jan-16)

Blocks, Ovals, or People Icons in Icon Array Risk Graphics? (Sept-15)

Getting ahead of illness: using metaphors to influence medical decision making (May-15)

 

 

Mon, June 23, 2014

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was interviewed by Reuters Health for the article "Shared decision making still lacking for cancer screening." He discusses his research and trade-offs in cancer screenings. "What this study does is it shows that despite all of the initiatives and the discussion of shared decision making that has been going on, we don't seem to be moving the needle very much," he states. 

His interview also received press in the Chicago Tribune and New York Daily News.

Thu, March 17, 2016

Dr. Reshma Jagsi was quoted in a Business Insider article on how the financial strains placed on cancer survivors can harm their quality of life after treatment. She explains, "Although many cancer survivors are able to return to work, research from our group and others has suggested that a substantial minority of cancer patients do lose their jobs after cancer diagnosis and are unable to find work again." 

Research Topics: 
Thu, March 17, 2016

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was quoted in the Verge article about a recent BMJ systematic review about the impact of communicating genetic risks of disease on health behavior. Dr. Zikmund-Fisher states: "The idea that providing genetic risk information is going to be transformative to everyone seems unlikely."

Michael Volk, MSc, MD

Alumni

Michael Volk was an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the University of Michigan. His clinical practice focuses on the care of patients with liver disease, including those undergoing liver transplantation and those with hepatocellular carcinoma. His research interests focus on the ethics of resource allocation, patient and physician decision making, and chronic disease management. In particular, he has conducted a series of studies designed to improve the way decisions are made about using high risk liver transplant organs.

Last Name: 
Volk

Megan Knaus, MPH

Research Associate

Megan joined CBSSM in 2014 and has worked on multiple grant funded research projects related to health communication, patient-provider decision making, and health interventions driven by behavioral economics. She currently works with Dr. Brian Zikmund-Fisher on a National Science Foundation grant testing infectious disease communication strategies.

Last Name: 
Knaus

CBSSM Seminar: Aaron Scherer, PhD

Wed, February 03, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Aaron Scherer, PhD


CBSSM Postdoctoral Fellow

The Language of Medicine

Is the way we talk about health and medicine simply expressive or does the language we use actually change how we perceive and respond to health risks and medical interventions? Aaron Scherer will discuss a number of studies that explore how metaphors, labels, and explanations may shape our health-related perceptions and behavior.

The study "Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide of Patients With Psychiatric Disorders in the Netherlands 2011 to 2014", co-authored by Ray De Vries, was featured in JOTWELL: The Journal of Things We Like (Lots). JOTWELL is an online publication that highlights the best recent scholarship relevant to the law. You can view the article here.

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