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Funded by the NIH

The overarching goal of our research is to improve opioid analgesic safety and efficacy by optimizing opioid risk recognition, informed analgesic decision-making, and drug storage/disposal behaviors among parents of youth who are prescribed these agents for home use. With this proposal, we aim to demonstrate that our Scenario-Tailored Opioid Messaging Program (STOMP?) will: 1) Improve parents' opioid risk understanding and their analgesic decision-making; 2) Enhance parents' analgesic self-efficacy, analgesic use, storage behaviors and their children's pain outcomes, and 3) To demonstrate that the STOMP? plus provision of a method to get rid of left-over medications will effectively nudge parents to safely dispose of left-over opioid analgesics. For more info: http://grantome.com/grant/NIH/R01-DA044245-01A1

PI: Terri Lewis-Voepel

CBSSM Co-Is: Brian Zikmund-Fisher & Alan Tait

Tue, April 08, 2014

Reshma Jagsi’s study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology about financial decline in breast cancer survivors has been cited by various health media outlets, including Bio-Medicine, Health News Digest, and various other outlets. The study found that after receiving treatment, a quarter of breast cancer survivors were found to be worse off financially. 

Dr. Andrew Barnosky stepped down from his role as Adult Ethics Committee chair, which is a position he has served for the last 16 years. CBSSM Faculty member Dr. Andrew G. Shuman will be the new committee chair. Dr. Barnosky will continue as a member of the faculty and a member of the Committee. The UMHS press release can be found here.

Matthew A. Corriere MD, MS

Faculty

Dr. Corriere’s research seeks to develop novel treatment approaches that incorporate patient-centered, cultural, and societal perspectives.  His current work is focused on helping doctors understand what matters most to patients so that this information can be used to make shared treatment decisions based on their goals and values.  Dr. Corriere also conducts research evaluating clinical treatment outcomes and imaging for arterial and venous disease.  Dr.

Last Name: 
Corriere
Thu, May 22, 2014

Susan Dorr Goold, M.D., M.H.S.A., M.A. is the senior author on an article receiving the annual “Professionalism Article Prize” by the ABIM Foundation. Jon C. Tilburt, M.D., M.P.H. of the Mayo Clinic is the study’s first author.

This award recognizes outstanding contributions to the field of medical professionalism. The article “Views of U.S. Physicians About Controlling Health Care Costs” was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in July 2013.

Research Topics: 
Thu, May 22, 2014

CBSSM faculty member Susan Dorr Goold M.D., M.H.S.A., M.A. was interviewed by the LA Times about doctors assisting with prison executions despite ethics rules.

“Physicians are healers. That knowledge should be used only for healing, not executions,” said Dorr Goold, professor of internal medicine and health management and policy at the University of Michigan who is the Chair of AMA’s Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs. “Participation as a physician is not ethical.”

Read the full LA Times story here.

Research Topics: 

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, gave a talk at the Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands, on June 22, 2011.

Dr. Jason Karlawish, Professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania, will discuss his forthcoming novel, "Open Wound: The Tragic Obsession of Dr. William Beaumont" on Thursday, October 20, 3-5 pm, at the Biomedical Research Science Building (BSRB), Room 1130.  "Open Wound" is a fictional account of true events along the early 19th century American frontier, tracing the relationship between Dr. William Beaumont and his illiterate French Canadian patient.  The young trapper sustains an injury that never heals, leaving a hole in his stomach that the curious doctor uses as a window both to understand the mysteries of digestion and to advance his career.  A reception will follow the talk, and books will be available for purchase on site from Nicola's Books.  The event is co-sponsored by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, the Center for the History of Medicine, and the University of Michigan Press.  Click here for more information about the book. 

CBSSM Seminar: Paul A. Lombardo, PhD, JD

Thu, September 22, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC Building 16, Conference Rm 266C

Paul A. Lombardo, PhD, JD
Regents' Professor and Bobby Lee Cook Professor of Law
Georgia State University College of Law

"From Psycographs to FMRI: Historical Context for the Claims of Neuroscience"

Abstract: In the U.S., announcement of the Presidential “Brain Initiative” has focused attention on “revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain” And neuroscience has begun to replace genetics as the field most likely to fill press headlines. The promise of more research funding for the field has led to extraordinary claims that research will soon lead to mind reading, lie detection, and unlocking the brain-based foundations of virtue and character. But these claims echo similar assertions from a century ago, many of which were eventually discarded as quackery, eugenics or misguided pseudoscience. Then the power of phrenology was touted, and machines like the “Psycograph” were offered to “thoroughly and accurately” measure “the  powers of intellect, affect and will.” Today similarly expansive claims are being made for color-coded functional magnetic resonance imagery. Are we facing true scientific triumph or mere recycled hyperbole? This presentation will explore the historical echoes of today’s most extravagant claims in the field of neuroscience, and analyze how our actual understanding of mental functioning compares to the hopeful assertions that are filling both the lay press and scientific journals.

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