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CBSSM Seminar: Paul A. Lombardo, PhD, JD

Thu, September 22, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
NCRC Building 16, Conference Rm 266C

Paul A. Lombardo, PhD, JD
Regents' Professor and Bobby Lee Cook Professor of Law
Georgia State University College of Law

"From Psycographs to FMRI: Historical Context for the Claims of Neuroscience"

Abstract: In the U.S., announcement of the Presidential “Brain Initiative” has focused attention on “revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain” And neuroscience has begun to replace genetics as the field most likely to fill press headlines. The promise of more research funding for the field has led to extraordinary claims that research will soon lead to mind reading, lie detection, and unlocking the brain-based foundations of virtue and character. But these claims echo similar assertions from a century ago, many of which were eventually discarded as quackery, eugenics or misguided pseudoscience. Then the power of phrenology was touted, and machines like the “Psycograph” were offered to “thoroughly and accurately” measure “the  powers of intellect, affect and will.” Today similarly expansive claims are being made for color-coded functional magnetic resonance imagery. Are we facing true scientific triumph or mere recycled hyperbole? This presentation will explore the historical echoes of today’s most extravagant claims in the field of neuroscience, and analyze how our actual understanding of mental functioning compares to the hopeful assertions that are filling both the lay press and scientific journals.

Tue, September 20, 2011

The CBS News website recently featured 10 tips to make better decisions about cancer care from U-M’s Angela Fagerlin, Ph.D., associate professor of internal medicine. Below is an excerpt from the article:

Cancer is scary, and doctors sometimes sound as if they’re speaking a foreign language when talking about the disease and its treatment. But “people are making life and death decisions that may affect their survival and they need to know what they’re getting themselves into,” says Fagerlin “Cancer treatments and tests can be serious. Patients need to know what kind of side effects they might experience as a result of the treatment they undergo.”


Tue, January 10, 2017

Geoffrey Barnes was featured in a recent MHealth Lab article, "Medication Adherence a Problem in Atrial Fibrillation Patients." Dr. Barnes is the lead author of JAMA Cardiology article, which reports that while anticoagulant therapy is important for stroke prevention in people with atrial fibrillation, many people don’t stick with it for various reasons (side effects, physician advice, etc.).

Andrew Barnosky received the Kaiser Permanente Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching. The Kaiser Award is the most prestigious teaching award given by the Medical School. Made possible by a grant from the Kaiser Foundation Hospitals, it consists of an honorarium of $1,000 and a certificate which is presented to each awardee at the Graduation Luncheon. Two awards are given each year – one for preclinical and one for clinical teaching. Congratulations!

You can read the press release here.

Dr. Lewis B. Morgenstern was one of the 21 Med School faculty/staff members who received honors through the Dean's Awards program. He received the Clinical and Health Services Research Award, which recognizes a faculty member or group of faculty members who are identified as having made outstanding contributions to the Medical School in clinical or health services research. You can read the press release here.

Angela Fagerlin was listed as one of the top 1% of most-cited researchers worldwide.

More than 3,200 researchers worldwide were included in the Thompson Reuters list, which ranks an individual’s impact based on a survey of Highly Cited Papers (defined as being in the top 1 percent by citations in the Web of Science database) between 2002-2012.

The University of Michigan ranks No. 11 in a new list of most-cited researchers produced by Thompson Reuters, with 27 U-M scientists determined by the company to be in the top 1 percent of their fields.




Thu, July 06, 2017

In an MHealth Lab article, Kenneth Langa discusses a new report, "Preventing Cognitive Decline and Dementia: a Way Forward" from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

2013 Bishop Lecture featuring Ruth Macklin, PhD

Wed, April 17, 2013 (All day)

The Bishop Lecture in Bioethics served as the keynote address for 2013 CBSSM Research Colloquium. The Bishop Lecture is an endowed lectureship made possible by a gift from the estate of Ronald C. and Nancy V. Bishop.  Ruth Macklin, PhD, Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health and Dr. Shoshanah Trachtenberg Frackman Faculty Scholar in Biomedical Ethics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, will present the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled, “Global Gender Justice:  Violence against women; whose responsibility?”

Keynote Abstract: In some countries, governmental authorities have done little to prevent or punish violence against women.  Examples of gender-based violence include not only intimate partner violence, but also rape as a weapon of war, civilian rape, and killing condoned in so-called "honor cultures."  Can a theory of global justice shed light on whether external governments or non-governmental groups should take responsibility for remedying the situation?  Who has the responsibility to respond to human rights violations?

The Bishop Lecture in Bioethics was jointly sponsored by the Bishop Lectureship in Bioethics fund and by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM). 

  • Click here for the videorecording of the 2013 Bishop Lecture.

Kathryn Moseley, MD, MPH

Kathryn Moseley has been elected as Secretary of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH). Congratulations!