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Tue, May 21, 2013

Masahito Jimbo was featured in a recent UMHS Press release, "Study finds gaps in “decision aids” designed to help determine right cancer screening option for patients." His study found that despite strong recommendations from the medical community to use these aids to help patients make more well-informed decisions, there is lack of evidence on whether they work – which may lead to fewer doctors using them. (Abstract)

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Fri, May 08, 2015

Ken Langa discusses how brain crossword puzzles, Sudoku and other brain games are not an evidence-based way to maintain mental sharpness and there is a lack of research in this area.

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Press Kit

About CBSSM

CBSSM acts at the premier intellectual gathering place of clinicians, social scientists, bioethicists, and all others interested in improving individual and societal health through scholarship and service.

Schedule an Interview

Members of the media interested in interviewing Center members can call the UMHS Public Relations office at 734-764-2220 between the hours 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern Time, or email us directly at cbssm-mgr@umich.edu

Janice Firn, PhD, MSW

Faculty

Dr. Firn has a BS from Michigan State University, MSW from the University of Michigan, and PhD from Lancaster University (UK). Before CBSSM, Janice worked in oncology and palliative care at Michigan Medicine. In her role as Clinical Ethicist for the Clinical Ethics Service, Janice responds to ethics consultation requests, and participates in preventative ethics rounds and education and research initiatives.  Her academic interests include bioethics; self-care, burnout, and resilience; palliative and end of life care; and interprofessional education and collaboration.

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Firn
Mon, April 24, 2017

Reshma Jagsi was recently quoted in the Reuters Health News article, "How consent requirements may shape teen mental health research."

Tue, May 21, 2013

Sarah Hawley is featured in ClickOnDetroit news item,"The debate over breast cancer treatment" in which Local 4's Rhonda Walker takes a closer look at the aggressive treatment more and more woman who are facing breast cancer are choosing.

Sun, October 17, 2010

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, was featured in an interview by the U-M News Service on September 29, 2010.  Dr. Zikmund-Fisher served as the featured guest editor for a special supplement to Medical Decision Making, Sept/Oct 2010, that focused on the DECISIONS study. In the interview, Dr. Zikmund-Fisher highlighted the need for health care providers to do a better job of educating patients about the medical decisions they face.  A video highlights the findings of the study and can be found at: http://ns.umich.edu/htdocs/releases/story.php?id=8008.  CBSSM faculty also involved in the DECISIONS study included Angela Fagerlin, PhD, and Mick Couper, PhD

Wed, May 18, 2016

Reshma Jagsi’s survey of high-achieving physician-scientists published in JAMA, found that nearly a third of women reported experiencing sexual harassment. As women now make up about half of medical school students, the researchers emphasize the importance of recognizing unconscious bias as well as overtly inappropriate behaviors.

1. Reshma Jagsi, Kent A. Griffith, Rochelle Jones, Chithra R. Perumalswami, Peter Ubel, Abigail Stewart. Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Experiences of Academic Medical Faculty. JAMA, 2016; 315 (19): 2120 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.2188

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Fri, October 04, 2013

The US News & World Report quoted Sarah Hawley and cited her research in a story about the tendency of young women with breast cancer to overestimate their risk of getting cancer in the opposite, healthy breast. 

An excerpt from the article, "Unfounded Fear Prompts Some Preventive Mastectomies: Study":

The findings echo some previous research, according to Sarah Hawley, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan Health System, in Ann Arbor. In her study, presented last year at a medical meeting, Hawley found that nearly 70 percent of women choosing the contralateral prophylactic mastectomy actually had a low risk of developing cancer in the healthy breast.

"Their findings are consistent with ours, in that desire to prevent cancer in the non-affected breast is a big reason patients reported for getting [contralateral prophylactic mastectomy]," Hawley said.

Better communication is needed to be sure women know the risks and benefits, and lack of benefit of getting the preventive surgery, Hawley pointed out. Better strategies to help patients manage anxiety and worry would help, too, she added.

 

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