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Sat, February 23, 2013

Susan Goold was quoted in a recent Associated Press article: Some Patients Won't See Nurses of Different Race."
"In general, I don't think honoring prejudicial preferences ... is morally justifiable" for a health care organization, said Dr. Susan Goold, a University of Michigan professor of internal medicine and public health. "That said, you can't cure bigotry ... There may be times when grudgingly acceding to a patient's strongly held preferences is morally OK."

Tue, July 26, 2011
The Department of Health and Human Services published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to request comment on how current regulations for protecting human subjects who participate in research might be modernized and revised to be more effective.  Changes are proposed to seven aspects of the current regulatory framework:
  • refinement of the existing risk-based regulatory framework;
  • utilization of a single IRB review of record for domestic sites of multi-site studies;
  • improvement of consent forms and the consent process;
  • establishment of mandatory data security and information protection standards for all studies involving identifiable data;
  • establishment of an improved, more systematic approach for the collection and analysis of data on unanticipated problems and adverse events;
  • extension of Federal regulatory protections to all research, regardless of funding source, conducted at institutions in the U.S. receiving some Federal funding from a Common Rule agency for research with human subjects; and
  • improvement in the harmonization of regulations and related agency guidance

The paper, "Pruning the regulatory tree: For human subjects research, maximum regulation does not mean maximum protection," authored by CBSSM faculty Scott Kim, Peter Ubel, and Ray De Vries, was cited in the ANPRM.


Dr. Jason Karlawish, Professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania, will discuss his forthcoming novel, "Open Wound: The Tragic Obsession of Dr. William Beaumont" on Thursday, October 20, 3-5 pm, at the Biomedical Research Science Building (BSRB), Room 1130.  "Open Wound" is a fictional account of true events along the early 19th century American frontier, tracing the relationship between Dr. William Beaumont and his illiterate French Canadian patient.  The young trapper sustains an injury that never heals, leaving a hole in his stomach that the curious doctor uses as a window both to understand the mysteries of digestion and to advance his career.  A reception will follow the talk, and books will be available for purchase on site from Nicola's Books.  The event is co-sponsored by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, the Center for the History of Medicine, and the University of Michigan Press.  Click here for more information about the book. 

Tue, September 20, 2011

The CBS News website recently featured 10 tips to make better decisions about cancer care from U-M’s Angela Fagerlin, Ph.D., associate professor of internal medicine. Below is an excerpt from the article:

Cancer is scary, and doctors sometimes sound as if they’re speaking a foreign language when talking about the disease and its treatment. But “people are making life and death decisions that may affect their survival and they need to know what they’re getting themselves into,” says Fagerlin “Cancer treatments and tests can be serious. Patients need to know what kind of side effects they might experience as a result of the treatment they undergo.”


Thu, September 11, 2014

NOVA (on PBS) broadcasted a special episode on vaccines. Brian Zikmund-Fisher was interviewed and prominently featured. Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago-whooping cough, measles, mumps-are returning, in part because nervous parents are skipping their children's shots. Amid the return of vaccine-preventable diseases, NOVA examined the science of immunization, tracked outbreaks, and shed light on the risks of opting out.

The program premired Wednesday, September 10, 2014 at 9 pm/8c on PBS. Watch the full program here.

You can read the press release here.

Research Topics: 
Tue, January 10, 2017

Geoffrey Barnes was featured in a recent MHealth Lab article, "Medication Adherence a Problem in Atrial Fibrillation Patients." Dr. Barnes is the lead author of JAMA Cardiology article, which reports that while anticoagulant therapy is important for stroke prevention in people with atrial fibrillation, many people don’t stick with it for various reasons (side effects, physician advice, etc.).

This month’s Bioethics Grand Rounds features Alan Tait, Ph.D., endowed professor and director of clinical research, Department of Anesthesiology.

He will present at the Ford Auditorium at noon on May 22.

Please feel free to bring your lunch and join us for a lively discussion of medical ethics. The Bioethics Grand Rounds is sponsored by the UMHS Adult Medical Ethics Committee and the Program of Society and Medicine. This educational session is open to all faculty and staff and members of the public.

CME and CEU credit is available.

Web Address:

Berguer Lecture on Ethics: Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD

Fri, January 26, 2018, 4:00pm
Danto Auditorium, Frankel Cardiovascular Center


"Communicating Everything Important Poorly vs. One Critical Thing Well"

Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Health and Behavior and Health Education
Research Associate Professor, Division of General Medicine, Department ofInternal Medicine
Associate Director, Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine

This lecture is open to faculty, staff, students, and the public having an interest in medical journalism, public policy and ethics.
At the conclusion of this lecture, participants will be able to acknowledge the ethical and societal importance of responsible medical journalism, and they will be able to respond to moral issues surrounding medical information in the press.
The University of Michigan Medical Schools is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
The University of Michigan Medical School designates this live activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit (s) TM.
Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Registration is now open for the April 25, 2017 CBSSM Research Colloquium & Bishop Lecture in Bioethics. This event is free and open to the public. Registration is encouraged, as it will help us to estimate numbers for catering and lunch. Please RSVP by April 18th.

The keynote address is the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics, an endowed lectureship made possible by a gift from the estate of Ronald C. and Nancy V. Bishop.  Norman Daniels, PhD will present the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: “Universal Access vs Universal Coverage: Two models of what we should aim for."

Norman Daniels, PhD is Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Location: Great Lakes Room, Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Click here to register for the Colloquium!

Click here for the Colloquium Schedule and Presentation Abstracts.