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Last Saturday, Dr. Susan Goold had the highly esteemed task of presenting to the AMA House of Delegates on modernizing the Code of Medical Ethics. As the chair of the AMA Committee on Ethical and Judicial Affairs (CEJA), Dr. Goold is very involved in this massive reformatting and modernization effort. More information can be found in the AMA Wire press release.

Mon, June 23, 2014

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was interviewed by Reuters Health for the article "Shared decision making still lacking for cancer screening." He discusses his research and trade-offs in cancer screenings. "What this study does is it shows that despite all of the initiatives and the discussion of shared decision making that has been going on, we don't seem to be moving the needle very much," he states. 

His interview also received press in the Chicago Tribune and New York Daily News.

Megan Knaus, MPH

Research Associate

Megan joined CBSSM in 2014 and has worked on multiple grant funded research projects related to health communication, patient-provider decision making, and health interventions driven by behavioral economics. She currently works with Dr. Brian Zikmund-Fisher on a National Science Foundation grant testing infectious disease communication strategies.

Last Name: 
Knaus
Mon, January 06, 2014

Dr. Reshma Jagsi worked on a study detailing the decline of US research spending versus the increase in spending in Japan and China. In the UMHS article, she says, "The United States has long been a world leader in driving research and development in the biomedical science. It's important to maintain that leadership role because biomedical research has a number of long term downstream economic benefits, especially around job creation," 

Research Topics: 
Sat, February 23, 2013

Susan Goold was quoted in a recent Associated Press article: Some Patients Won't See Nurses of Different Race."
"In general, I don't think honoring prejudicial preferences ... is morally justifiable" for a health care organization, said Dr. Susan Goold, a University of Michigan professor of internal medicine and public health. "That said, you can't cure bigotry ... There may be times when grudgingly acceding to a patient's strongly held preferences is morally OK."

Thu, April 04, 2013

Babies cry and spit up … and too often those common symptoms are labeled as disease, according to a new study conducted by U-M researchers. Frequent use of the GERD label can lead to overuse of medication. The study was published online today in the journal Pediatrics.

Stories have already been published by Reuters,  Yahoo News!MedPage TodayNPRMSN Healthy Living,  CBS News, and the Chicago Tribune, among others. Laura Scherer, PHD, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, Angela Fagerlin, PhD and Beth Tarini, MD are authors on this study.

This month’s Bioethics Grand Rounds features Alan Tait, Ph.D., endowed professor and director of clinical research, Department of Anesthesiology.

He will present at the Ford Auditorium at noon on May 22.

Please feel free to bring your lunch and join us for a lively discussion of medical ethics. The Bioethics Grand Rounds is sponsored by the UMHS Adult Medical Ethics Committee and the Program of Society and Medicine. This educational session is open to all faculty and staff and members of the public.

CME and CEU credit is available.

Web Address: http://www.med.umich.edu/adultethics

Tue, July 26, 2011
The Department of Health and Human Services published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to request comment on how current regulations for protecting human subjects who participate in research might be modernized and revised to be more effective.  Changes are proposed to seven aspects of the current regulatory framework:
 
  • refinement of the existing risk-based regulatory framework;
  • utilization of a single IRB review of record for domestic sites of multi-site studies;
  • improvement of consent forms and the consent process;
  • establishment of mandatory data security and information protection standards for all studies involving identifiable data;
  • establishment of an improved, more systematic approach for the collection and analysis of data on unanticipated problems and adverse events;
  • extension of Federal regulatory protections to all research, regardless of funding source, conducted at institutions in the U.S. receiving some Federal funding from a Common Rule agency for research with human subjects; and
  • improvement in the harmonization of regulations and related agency guidance

The paper, "Pruning the regulatory tree: For human subjects research, maximum regulation does not mean maximum protection," authored by CBSSM faculty Scott Kim, Peter Ubel, and Ray De Vries, was cited in the ANPRM.

 

Dr. Jason Karlawish, Professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania, will discuss his forthcoming novel, "Open Wound: The Tragic Obsession of Dr. William Beaumont" on Thursday, October 20, 3-5 pm, at the Biomedical Research Science Building (BSRB), Room 1130.  "Open Wound" is a fictional account of true events along the early 19th century American frontier, tracing the relationship between Dr. William Beaumont and his illiterate French Canadian patient.  The young trapper sustains an injury that never heals, leaving a hole in his stomach that the curious doctor uses as a window both to understand the mysteries of digestion and to advance his career.  A reception will follow the talk, and books will be available for purchase on site from Nicola's Books.  The event is co-sponsored by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, the Center for the History of Medicine, and the University of Michigan Press.  Click here for more information about the book. 

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