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PIHCD-Ken Pituch

Thu, May 11, 2017, 4:00pm
NCRC bldg 16 B004E

Topic: ICU tracheostomy decisions  the lens of professor Yates’ 10 cardinal issues in good decision making that is well respected in non-medical settings

In a new commentary, Geoff Barnes argues “What you don’t know can kill you” as it related to untreated Atrial fibrillation, which leads to too many preventable strokes and deaths.

Research Topics: 

Lewis Morgenstern, MD

Thu, December 20, 2007

A CBSSM study found that colostomy patients who felt that their condition was irreversible reported better quality of life than those who hoped that they would be cured. For a summary, see this press release and video. The researchers are Dylan M. Smith, PhD; Peter A. Ubel, MD; Aleksandra Jankovic, MS (all at the University of Michigan); and George Loewenstein, PhD, (of Carnegie Mellon University). Health Psychology will publish the article in mid-November 2009.

Press coverage of this research has been extensive. Peter Bregman reported on the study in the July 2009 Business Week Online, applying the concepts to help people manage their stressful and unpredictable lives. Read his full article here. Preliminary data from this study were cited in the 7th Annual “Year in Ideas” issue of the New York Times Magazine in December 2007. Read recent international media coverage:
US News and World Report Health Day
Voice of America Radio
Daily Mail UK
Reuters India

The Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences at Michigan State University has posted information about its 2011-12 Brown Bag/Webinar Series.  All sessions take place 12-1 pm in C-102 East Fee Hall on the East Lansing campus.  Sessions for the fall include:
September 7: Helen Veit, PhD, "The ethics of aging in an age of youth: Rising life expectancy in the early twentieth century United States"
October 19: Scott Kim, MD, PhD, "Democratic deliberation about surrogate consent for dementia research"
November 10: Stuart J. Youngner, MD, "Regulated euthanasia in the Netherlands: Is it working?"
December 7: Karen Meagher, PhD candidate, "Trustworthiness in public health practice"
See for more information.

Funded by National Science Foundation.

Funding Years: 2013-2016

The goal of this supplemental proposal is to conduct preproduction activities that will allow the successful and efficient collection of the PSID data in 2013. Specifically, the aims are to 1) conduct scientific review and development of the 2013 instrument, 2) program and test the new instrument, including the fielding of a pretest, 3) develop respondent contact materials, including a contact information update request, and other pre-interview informational materials, 4) conduct an interviewer training for the 2013 field effort, including the development of training materials and content that will lead to interviewer certification.

PI(s): Charles Brown

Co-I(s): Mick Couper, Katherine McGonagle


Depicting Risks and Benefits of Medical Treatment (Dec-12)

Imagine that you have just been diagnosed with high cholesterol.  You are asked to decide whether or not take a type of drug called a statin to lower your cholesterol.  In order to help you decide, you are given information about the risk and benefits of taking statins.

On the following page, consider 4 different formats for presenting the risks and benefits.  


The ethics of resuscitation (Sep-11)

Traditional ethical teaching suggests that a physician's assessment of a patient's best interest should guide the decision of whether to administer emergency life-sustaining therapy, absent guidance by the patient or family members.  In pediatric medicine, physicians may insist on life-saving therapy if they believe it is in a child's best interest to receive it, even if the parents seek to refuse it.  It is unclear exactly how physicians make such assessments, however, and whether/how these assessments influence decision-making in critical situations.  Consider the following scenario:

How Risky are "High Risk" Kidneys? (May-11)

The government requires that potential kidney transplant recipients be informed if an organ donor engaged in CDC categorized "high risk" behaviors. Are these "high risk" donor kidneys associated with worse survival rates following transplantation? Does this label "high risk" result in usable kidneys being discarded?