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Lisa Szymecko, JD, PhD

Alumni

Lisa Szymecko joined CBSSM in May 2012 as a Research Area Specialist Intermediate, working as the study coordinator for Susan Goold on the DECIDERS and PCORI projects.


Lisa earned her Bachelors of Science degree in Chemical Engineering from Michigan Technological University, her Juris Doctorate from Detroit College of Law, and her PhD in Resource Development from Michigan State University.

Last Name: 
Syzmecko
Mon, March 19, 2018

The new American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) guideline for treating breast cancer patients with whole breast irradiation recommends that most patients receive an accelerated treatment, known as hypofractioned therapy, instead of the conventional one. Reshma Jagsi is co-chair of task force that compiled the guideline.

J. Scott Roberts, PhD

Faculty

Scott Roberts, PhD, is Professor of Health Behavior & Health Education at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health (U-M SPH), where he directs the School’s Public Health Genetics program and teaches a course on public health ethics. A clinical psychologist by training, Dr. Roberts conducts research on the psychosocial implications of genetic testing for adult-onset diseases.

Last Name: 
Roberts

Lewis Morgenstern, MD

Thu, December 20, 2007

A CBSSM study found that colostomy patients who felt that their condition was irreversible reported better quality of life than those who hoped that they would be cured. For a summary, see this press release and video. The researchers are Dylan M. Smith, PhD; Peter A. Ubel, MD; Aleksandra Jankovic, MS (all at the University of Michigan); and George Loewenstein, PhD, (of Carnegie Mellon University). Health Psychology will publish the article in mid-November 2009.

Press coverage of this research has been extensive. Peter Bregman reported on the study in the July 2009 Business Week Online, applying the concepts to help people manage their stressful and unpredictable lives. Read his full article here. Preliminary data from this study were cited in the 7th Annual “Year in Ideas” issue of the New York Times Magazine in December 2007. Read recent international media coverage:
US News and World Report Health Day
Voice of America Radio
Daily Mail UK
Reuters India

Reshma Jagsi will be a Keynote Speaker at “Strategies to Empower Women to Achieve Academic Success," which will be held June 7th (8:30 a.m. – 11 a.m., A. Alfred Taubman Biomedical Science Research Building). The event is sponsored by the A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute.

Click here for more details.

Research Topics: 

2014 Bishop Lecture featuring Myra Christopher

Thu, May 15, 2014 (All day)
Location: 
Vandenberg Meeting Hall (2nd floor), The Michigan Hall, 911 N. University, Ann Arbor, MI.

The CBSSM Research Colloquium featured the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as the keynote address.  Myra Christopher presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: "The Moral Imperative to Transform the Way Pain is Perceived, Judged and Treated".

Myra Christopher holds the Kathleen M. Foley Chair in Pain and Palliative Care at the Center for Practical Bioethics.  Prior to December 2011, Ms. 

Christopher was President and CEO of the Center for Practical Bioethics since its inception in 1984 through December 2011.  From 1998-2003, Christopher also served as the national program officer of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s National Program Office for State-based Initiatives to Improve End-of Life Care which was housed at the Center.  These roles have allowed Christopher to continue her lifelong mission to improve care for those who are seriously ill and their families.

Since the late 1990s, Christopher has expanded the scope of her work to include the under treatment of chronic pain.  She is currently the Director of the Pain Action Initiative: A National Strategy (PAINS) and serves as Chair of the PAINS Steering Committee. From 2010-2011 she served as a member of Pain Study Committee at the Institute of Medicine focused on the under-treatment of pain.  In 2012 she was appointed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sibelius, to the Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee (IPRCC) at the National Institutes of Health. In that capacity, she also serves on the Oversight Committee for the National Pain Strategy Task Force. 

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) Research Colloquium was held Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Vandenberg Meeting Hall (2nd floor), The Michigan League, 911 N. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

The novelty of risk and vaccination intentions (May-12)

It's 2009.  Early in the year, a 9-year-old girl from California became the first person with a confirmed case of H1N1 ("swine") influenza in the United States.  Shortly thereafter, the U.S. declared a public health emergency and the World Health Organization declared a phase 6 pandemic (the highest level possible).  By September 2009 a vaccination was developed and was available within a month.

You've been following the news about the H1N1 influenza as developments have unfolded throughout the year, and you feel some concern.  You have been wondering about the risk of coming down with the H1N1 flu yourself and have been thinking about whether you should be vaccinated. 

Thu, May 26, 2011

Raymond De Vries was appointed Professor of Midwifery Science at the University of Maastricht (Netherlands) in November 2010.  As is the custom in European universities, he delivered an inaugural lecture, outlining the educational and research goals of his professorship on May 26, 2011.  It was preceded by a research symposium focusing on risk in maternity care, with speakers exploring the way risk is measured and used by care providers and the way pregnant women respond to assessments of risk they are given. Click here to view a video of his inaugural address, which is in English. Click here for a news article about Dr. De Vries, in Dutch.

Tue, September 20, 2011

The CBS News website recently featured 10 tips to make better decisions about cancer care from U-M’s Angela Fagerlin, Ph.D., associate professor of internal medicine. Below is an excerpt from the article:

Cancer is scary, and doctors sometimes sound as if they’re speaking a foreign language when talking about the disease and its treatment. But “people are making life and death decisions that may affect their survival and they need to know what they’re getting themselves into,” says Fagerlin “Cancer treatments and tests can be serious. Patients need to know what kind of side effects they might experience as a result of the treatment they undergo.”

 

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