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Mon, January 06, 2014

Dr. Reshma Jagsi worked on a study detailing the decline of US research spending versus the increase in spending in Japan and China. In the UMHS article, she says, "The United States has long been a world leader in driving research and development in the biomedical science. It's important to maintain that leadership role because biomedical research has a number of long term downstream economic benefits, especially around job creation," 

Research Topics: 

Funded by National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2011-2017

The CoreValve US Pivotal Trial applies clinical best practices—including CT-based sizing—and is meticulously monitored, including the use of an independent echocardiographic core lab. Within the trial, the High Risk Study randomized 795 patients between surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) with the CoreValve System across 45 US sites. The TAVI procedure is used as an alternative to open heart surgery and allows access to the diseased aortic valve via an artery in the leg and is designed for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for surgery due to age or other health issues.

PI(s): David Bach, G M Deeb

Co-I(s): Devin Brown, Stanley Chetcuti, Paul Grossman, Himanshu Patel, Michael Shea, Darin Zahuranec

Funded by Holden Research Fund Award

Funding Years: 2011

 

PI: Naomi Laventhal

Funded by the National Institutes of Health/ArchiMD, Inc

Funding years: 2012-2014

 

PI: Alan Tait

Funded by Department of Health and Human Services - Agency for Health Care Research and Quality-Subcontracts

Funding Years: 2013 - 2015.

PI(s): Angela Fagerlin

Holly Witteman, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Holly Witteman was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at CBSSM, 2009-2011. She studied mathematics and engineering at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, and worked in research and design in industry for several years before pursuing a Ph.D. in human factors engineering at the University of Toronto, where she was a fellow in Health Care, Technology, and Place, a strategic training initiative that fosters interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars in the humanities and sciences.

Last Name: 
Witteman
Mon, December 15, 2014

Jennifer Griggs, MD, MPH was quoted in recent USA Today article about calls for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to change its labeling on the drug Tamoxifen - recommending its use for 10 years instead of the current five.

Research Topics: 

Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2014 - 2017.

Suicide is a leading cause of death and suicide attempts are a major cause of disability, lost productivity, and health care costs. Suicide prevention is a research priority of the National Institutes of Health, and the US Surgeon General's National Strategy for Suicide Prevention calls for a shift towards recovery-oriented prevention efforts which promote hope and social support. Hopelessness and social isolation are two proximal risk factors for suicide which may be improved via peer mentorship, a form of peer support effective for preventing depression and repeat psychiatric hospitalizations. The primary aims of this study are to develop and pilot test a peer mentorship intervention for psychiatrically hospitalized patients at high risk for suicide. The intervention will be adapted by an expert panel from existing peer support training protocols to target suicide risk factors and to enhance suicide risk management. Protocols for training and supervising peer mentors and measures of intervention fidelity will also be developed. The intervention will then be pilot teste among 60 participants randomly assigned to receive the peer mentorship intervention plus usual care or usual care alone. Participants will be recruited from the inpatient psychiatry unit at the University of Michigan Health System. Inclusion criteria will include medical record documentation of suicidal ideation or suicide attempt at admission, and exclusion criteria will include significant cognitive impairment (according to the Mini-Cog), current receipt of peer support, or determination that peer mentorship may cause distress to the patient or the peer mentor. The peer mentorship intervention will include an in-person visit on the inpatient unit and regular in-person or telephone follow-up for 3 months post-discharge. The intervention will be delivered by peer specialists--individuals in stable recovery from serious mental illness who have received formal training and certification in peer support from the state of Michigan--with at least 6 months of professional peer support experience. The primary outcomes of the pilot study are acceptability and feasibility of the intervention as determined by: 1) >50% of eligible participants enroll in the study, 2) >70% of enrollees complete final follow- up measures at 6 months, and 3) among those assigned to the peer mentorship intervention, >80% complete an inpatient session and the median number of total sessions is at least 4. Peer mentorship sessions will be recorded and rated for fidelity. Measures of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts (the intended primary outcomes of a subsequent efficacy study) and secondary outcomes such as quality of life, functioning, depression, and service use will be obtained at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months post-enrollment by a research assistant blinded to study arm. An exploratory aim will be to measure potential mediators of intervention effectiveness including belongingness, burdensomeness, and hopelessness according to the interpersonal theory of suicide. If acceptability and feasibility are demonstrated, the study will result in a novel recovey-oriented suicide prevention intervention ready for a fully-powered randomized controlled efficacy trial.

PI(s): Paul Pfeiffer

Co-I(s): Mark Ilgen, H. Myra Kim, Cheryl King, Marcia Valenstein

PIHCD: Holly Brine

Wed, July 13, 2016, 4:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16
Holly Brine, a NICU fellow, will present on a survey for clinicians about how framing affects decisions about neonatal sepsis.

CBSSM Seminar: Jan Van den Bulck, PhD

Tue, November 28, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Jan Van den Bulck, PhD
Professor, Communication Studies

Topic:
"Are the media (re-)defining how we interact with each other and with the world?

We know everything there is to know about people we have never even met. Through social media, we follow their every move. We even know their pets. Our media use interferes with healthy sleep, family meals, or even our work. Our children need levels of self-control to manage distractions that threaten their schoolwork. Or do they?"

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