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Funded by the American Cancer Society

Funding Years: 2006-2011

This study examines the impact of "status-assessing" email messages sent to individuals who decided to quit smoking and chose a date to quit. Participants receive email messages 3 and 5 weeks after their self selected quit dates, asking them to click on a URL link that matches their current smoking status (quit, tried but relapsed, never quit). Participants who click on a link receive information targeted to their current smoking status.

CHCR Link

PI: Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding years: 2008-2013

The specific aims are: 1) To test the effectiveness of a preference-tailored (PT) vs. standard information (SI) intervention for increasing primary care patient's CRC screening adherence in a randomized controlled trial at two locations; 2) To assess the impact of the intervention on informed decision making, knowledge and attitudes toward screening, decisional outcomes, and intention to get screened; and 3) To conduct a cost effectiveness analysis of the PT intervention for increasing CRC screening. For more information, visit NIH Reporter

PI: Sarah Hawley

Co-Is: Angela Fagerlin, Victor Strecher

CBSSM's Co-Director Angela Fagerlin, Ph.D., has been named one of "25 Champions of Shared Decision Making." According to the Informed Medical Decisions Foundation, "Angie has spent her career testing methods for communicating the risks and benefits of treatment options to patients, especially through decision aids. Based on the knowledge she has gained, Angie developed and tested decision aids for prostate cancer and breast cancer prevention. Her work has truly advanced the field of risk communication and patient-physician communication." 

Congratulations Angie! You can view the list here

Funded by American Cancer Society.

Funding Years: 2014-2017.

The study will examine how informal decision supporters (e.g., partners, family, and friends) contribute decisions about surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy treatment, and how these roles may vary by race and ethnicity. The project will utilize existing resources from the Cancer Surveillance and Outcomes Research Team's (CanSORT) Program Project Grant "The Challenge of Individualizing Treatments for Patients with Breast Cancer," a $13 million award received from NCI in 2012.

PI(s): Sarah Hawley

Co-I(s): Jennifer Griggs, Nancy Janz, Steven Katz, Yun Li

 

Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 1995-1999

This project was formed with the intent of giving citizens, at the grass roots level, the opportunity to help shape the kinds of policies which will govern the use of genetic technology in the future. The two principal project goals are 1.) utilizing “rational democratic deliberation” to develop recommendations for the three policy domains - laws, professional standards, and institutional policies - regarding the use and application of genome research and technology; and 2.) To disseminate the findings to the public, policymakers, health educators, and practitioners.

PI: Toby Citrin

Co-I: Edward Goldman

Funded by Kaiser Permanente Research Foundation Institute

Funding Years: 2014 - 2015.

This retrospective cohort study will assess the association of BPH treatment (5ARI and alpha-blocker medications) with the occurrence of prostate cancer related mortality. An electronic algorithm for classifying prostate cancer related deaths will be created and validated using medical records. This study will also assess a number of secondary endpoints including the occurrence of prostate cancer and metastatic prostate cancer, cardiovascular and all cause mortality.

PI(s): Sarah Hawley, Lauren Wallner (Sponsor PI)

Funded by Veterans Education Research Association of Michigan

Funding Years: 2010-2016

This research study aims to compare the effectiveness of two proven treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): Prolonged Exposure (PE), sertraline, and their combination. In addition, the investigators are examining predictors of response to these two treatments and how PTSD symptoms, thoughts, and biological factors may be changed by such treatments. Biological mechanisms of change are also examined including emotion processing and regulation in fMRI, HPA axis function, and genetics and genomics. The investigators are also examining acceptability of each treatment and reasons for ending treatment.

PI(s): Sheila Rauch

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim

Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2011-2016

The MROC Study seeks to evaluate and compare from the patient's point of view the leading options for breast reconstruction after mastectomy. This study will help patients, physicians, payers and policy makers better understand the various surgeries available for breast reconstruction. Although many women choose reconstruction, the number of options as well as their pros and cons can make decision making difficult and stressful. From this research, we hope to learn more about what works best for patients undergoing these operations.

PI: Edwin Wilkins

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim

Salomeh Michelle Salari, MS

Fellow

Sally is a fourth year medical student at the University of Michigan with the intent of specializing in Obstetrics and Gynecology. She is a member of the "Pathway of Excellence" ethics co-curricular program and is the CBSSM's second pre-doctoral clinical ethics fellow. Her interests include preventative ethics and moral distress, for which she is piloting "Moral Distress (MoD) Rounds" on non-intensive patient units at Mott Hospital.

Last Name: 
Salari
Fri, February 21, 2014

Dr. Reshma Jagsi was involved with a study that reported an increase in women who recieved breast reconstruction following a masectomy for breast cancer. The study found that, "46 percent of patients received reconstruction in 1998 but that figure rose to 63 percent by 2007." Jagsi said, "Breast reconstruction has a big impact on quality of life for breast cancer survivors. As we are seeing more women survive breast cancer, we need to focus on long term survivorship issues and ensuring that women have access to this important part of treatment."

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