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Funded by Department of Defense - Department of the Army

Funding Years: 2012-2016

This study will test a tissue equivalent ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalent (EVPOME), which is your own cells grown on top of a piece of AlloDerm (a commercially available freeze dried human cadaver tissue that is routinely used in present day surgical reconstructive procedures) to create a new piece of soft tissue for use only in your body. The tissue equivalent product will be tested against a non-experimental method of grafts, the gold standard a piece of palatal oral mucosa (POM) to see which works best. Patients will be randomly assigned to receive either the EVPOME or POM to cover the defect in their mouths. The objective of the study is to assess the safety and efficacy for the use of human EVPOME for soft tissue intraoral grafting procedures compared to the "gold standard" palatal oral mucosa (POM) graft.

PI(s): Stephen Feinberg, Robert Eber

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim, William Giannobile

Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Learning Health Systems Symposium

Fri, November 18, 2016, 8:30am to 3:30pm
Location: 
Taubman Biomedical Science Research Building (BSRB) 109 Zina Pitcher Place

This symposium will promote dialogue and contribute to a research agenda on how learning health system organizers should engage the ethical, legal and social implications of this work.

The next generation of health information technology organizes data into large, networked systems to address challenges of U.S. health systems: spiraling costs, poor health outcomes, safety issues, unproductive research enterprises, and failure to implement known clinical best practices. More than simply “Big Data,” these systems are arranged as “learning health systems,” multi-stakeholder federations that gather and analyze data to create useful knowledge that is disseminated to all stakeholders. Harnessing the power of health data for learning strains ethical, legal, and social paradigms for how health information should be collected, stored, accessed, used, and destroyed.

CBSSM is a co-sponsor, along with the Brehm Center, the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR), the School of Public Health, and Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS).

EVENT REGISTRATION

Mon, April 17, 2017

A new piece by Brian Zikmund-Fisher and former CBSSM post-doc, Laura Scherer is out in the Conversation, "Maximizers vs. minimizers: The personality trait that may guide your medical decisions – and costs." They developed and validated a 10-item questionnaire that assesses a person’s maximizing or minimizing tendencies on a scale, from one (strong minimizing) to seven (strong maximizing). Across four studies, they found this difference predicts health care use across a range of medical interventions and health problems, from cancer screening preferences to vaccination. They hope that identifying variations in maximizing or minimizing tendencies may be useful in trying to address both overuse and underuse in health care.

Research Topics: 

Submit Your Paper for Consideration in the ASBH Student Paper Competition

If you are a student who would like to be considered for the Student Paper Award, please send your paper to the ASBH office in an electronic format (Word or PDF) to candersen@asbh.org, with “ASBH Student Paper Competition” in the subject line.  All papers need to be received at the ASBH office by July 15, 2013 to be considered.    The Awards Committee will review and rank all submissions.  The top three papers will be placed in a special session at the Annual Meeting, and one winner will be chosen at the meeting by the Awards Committee. The award will be presented during the Members’ meeting.

All papers will be assessed anonymously.  Do not include identifying information in your paper submissions, such as title pages with your name. Previous winners are not eligible for consideration. Eligible papers should be no more than 3500 words in length. A student is defined as one who is actively pursuing an advanced degree and has not received a doctoral-level degree (e.g., MD, PhD, JD or equivalent degree). Authors who are not students according to the definition above are not eligible for the Student Paper Award. Coauthored papers are eligible only if all authors are students.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the ASBH office at: info@asbh.org

Thank you,
 
American Society for Bioethics + Humanities (ASBH)
Phone: 847-375-4745

www.asbh.org

 

Funded by the National Cancer Institute

Funding Years: 2010-2012

Approximately 10-30% of men who undergo external beam radiation for localized prostate cancer see rising PSA scores following treatment. Some of these men need androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) as salvage treatment. ADT is not curative and has significant side effects that impact quality of life (QOL). These facts must be balanced against its clinical need.

The decision to initiate hormonal therapy is driven more by patient anxiety and less by clinical parameters. Thus, men need to better understand how their PSA values and likelihood of recurrence will change over time.

A novel computer model, based on 2,386 patients previously treated, will provide this information. This project aims to develop and test methods of communicating this information to patients and to determine how patients use it in their treatment decisions. 

Aim 1. Develop several graphical methods for presenting the key pieces of numerical information in regard to predicted PSA response and clinical failure.

Aim 2: Pilot test the materials in urology and RT clinics to determine the best method for communicating the information to patients. Based on pilot testing, choose one graphical format for further evaluation.

Aim 3: Using the identified graphical format, test the use of these materials in encounters with patients who are actually making decisions regarding ADT. We assess anxiety, knowledge, risk perceptions, actual behavior in regard to ADT, self-efficacy for making a treatment decision, and satisfaction with the tool.

Daniel Hamstra (PI), Doris R. Brown (Co-I), Angela Fagerlin (Co-I), Shruti Jolly (Co-I), Karin Olson (Co-I), John Wei (Co-I).

 

Funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Funding Years: 2012-2013.

Diabetes is a complex, chronic disease encompassing many domains of treatment. VHA and others have created diabetes guidelines to help support providers and patients in making choices about optimal treatment approaches. However, most guidelines are broad in nature, and offer relatively little guidance on how to personalize care in order to maximize treatment benefits, minimize the intensity and negative effects of treatment, and best align with individual treatment preferences. 

We will test the effectiveness of a personalized decision support program. Our long term goals are:

  • To test and implement a decision support program, including decision coaching supported by an interactive, personalized decision support tool, in clinical practice via our Patient-Aligned Care Team (PACT) laboratory.
  • To assess the impact of personalized decision support on patient-centeredness, patient satisfaction, and the effectiveness of risk communication and treatment decision making.

We propose an interventional study to examine the effectiveness of personalized decision support. The intervention will consist of two key components: a decision coach  and a personalized diabetes decision support tool. The decision support tool has mostly been developed via AHRQ and local pilot funding mechanisms, and is informed by personalized estimation of treatment benefits for blood glucose, blood pressure, and lipid treatment based on extensive modeling work done by our investigative team. The personalized benefit information is communicated through graphical risk communication methods (pictographs).  

PI(s): Angela Fagerlin 

Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2011-2017)

In the United States, over 300,000 individuals over age 65 suffer from distal radius fractures (DRFs) each year. Despite the frequency of this injury and over 200 years of experience treating DRFs, management of elderly DRFs is still controversial. Close reduction and casting is a nonsurgical technique that is frequently used, but osteoporotic fractures, common in the elderly, often collapse and displace. The three currently applied surgical techniques are close reduction and percutaneous pinning, external fixation with or without percutaneous pinning, and internal fixation with volar locking plating. Preliminary evidence indicates that locking plate fixation can permit elderly patients to move their hands and wrists much sooner in order to return to self-care activities more quickly. Although these outcomes are promising, there is no randomized controlled clinical trial to demonstrate that the more invasive, and perhaps more costly, plating technique is superior to the other simpler approaches. The aim of this randomized controlled trial is to compare outcomes of these three surgical techniques in treating unstable DRFs in the elderly. The secondary aim is to follow a cohort of elderly patients who choose not to have surgery to evaluate outcomes following treatment by close reduction and casting alone. This clinical trial is the most ambitious study in hand surgery by assembling most of the leading centers in North America to collect evidence-based data to guide future treatment of this prevalent injury in the growing elderly population.

PI: Kevin Chung

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim

Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2014-2016

This proposal's main objective is the development of a novel Perfusion Monitoring Device (PMD) based upon diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), which will enable microsurgeons to assess the level of vascularization of buried (prelaminated) flaps and the successful perfusion of transplanted microvascular grafts. The PMD will shift current assessment of buried flap vascularization from subjective to direct quantitative determination. Currently there is no widely accepted clinical method of measuring buried flap vascularization or successful transplanted microvascular graft perfusion. The PMD would fill this need. The PMD leverages the recent availability of compact low-cost light sources, solid state detectors, and CPUs to simplify and miniaturize the measurement of buried flap vascularization and successful transplanted microvascular graft perfusion. The development of this technology is critical both for accident victims and for wounded soldiers, who have returned home with complex maxillofacial injuries. These injuries result in devastating soft tissue defects, i.e. avulsion of the lips that require innovative surgical approaches that include the use of tissue engineering in combination with microvascular surgery to develop unique prevascularized prelaminated flaps that are critical in the reconstruction of complex human anatomy such as the lips. Since these unique prelaminated flaps are buried under the skin we need novel PMDs to monitor their vascularization so that they can be harvested for transplantation at the most optimal moment. We will use both phantoms and an animal model in this Phase I proposal for the development of the PMD using DCS.

PI(s): Stephen Feinberg, Sean Edwards

Co-I(s): Brent Ward, H. Myra Kim, Joseph Helman, Mary-Ann Mycek

ELSI-LHS Symposium

Wed, November 15, 2017, 8:00am to 4:00pm
Location: 
Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave

Join us for our 2nd annual symposium and workshop on the ethical, legal and social implications of learning health systems (ELSI-LHS).


This year's focus will be on data and knowledge sharing.


NOV 15 - 8:00 am - 4:00 pm: The symposium will lay out the ELSI of data sharing and translation in learning health systems that strive to be both FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) and fair. The day will interactively address critical issues on data and knowledge sharing.


Speakers include John Wilbanks, Elizabeth Pike, Kenneth Goodman, Debra Mathews, Peter Embi, Peter Singleton, Warren Kibbe, Joon-Ho Yu and more to come!


Proceeds will be synthesized into draft recommendations for data and translation to practice & streamline future ELSI-LHS research.


We have issued a Call for Poster Abstracts to be included in the 2nd annual symposium. Poster displays should relate to the conference theme, "Data and Knowledge Sharing," and may relate to either ELSI or technical aspects of learning health systems. Abstracts and posters should be developed for an interdisciplinary audience including social scientists, informaticians, health care providers, and community members.


To submit an abstract, please go to: 2017 ELSI Abstract Submission
#elsilhs

CBSSM is a co-sponsor of this event.

David Sandberg, PhD

Faculty

Dr. Sandberg is a pediatric psychologist and clinical researcher.  As a pediatric psychologist, he delivers psychoeducational and behavioral health services to persons with endocrine disorders and their families, in particular, conditions affecting linear growth or disorders of sex development (DSD), i.e., congenital conditions in which development of sex chromosomes, gonads or sex anatomy is atypical.

Last Name: 
Sandberg

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