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Wed, October 11, 2017

In a study published in Cancer, Reshma Jagsi, Sarah Hawley and other researchers examined the impact double mastectomy on employment of breast cancer patients. They found that working patients who received more aggressive treatments were more likely to experience substantial employment disruptions.

Thu, May 22, 2014

CBSSM faculty member Susan Dorr Goold M.D., M.H.S.A., M.A. was interviewed by the LA Times about doctors assisting with prison executions despite ethics rules.

“Physicians are healers. That knowledge should be used only for healing, not executions,” said Dorr Goold, professor of internal medicine and health management and policy at the University of Michigan who is the Chair of AMA’s Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs. “Participation as a physician is not ethical.”

Read the full LA Times story here.

Research Topics: 

Emily Chen, MA

Research Associate

Emily Chen joined CBSSM in February 2016 and works with Drs. Julie Wright and Darin Zahuranec on several grant funded research projects on developing decision aids and family perspectives in decision making. Prior to moving to Michigan, Emily worked on several studies regarding mindfulness and cognitive styles at Harvard University. Emily received her BS in Atmospheric Science and a certificate in Neurobiology and Cognitive Science from National Taiwan University. She went on to receive her MA in Psychology from Boston University.

Last Name: 
Chen

Cited in C.S. Mott’s Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Physician’s Brief, recent research led by CBSSM’s Naomi Laventhal and Stephanie Kukora examines the role and accuracy of antenatal counseling in supporting shared decision making for complicated pregnancies, particularly those with a poor prognosis.

Other articles by Naomi Laventhal in the Journal of Pediatrics, the Journal of Perinatology, and Pediatric Cardiology are also cited.

Click here for more details.

Thu, October 26, 2017

In a new analysis in Health Affairs, CBSSM's Jeffrey Kullgren and fellow researchers found that while the "Choosing Wisely" campaign to reduce overtesting and overtreatment is off to a strong start, more work is still needed to cut back on low-value care.

Tue, January 16, 2018

CBSSM Director, Reshma Jagsi was recently interviewed for the LA Times article, "Will medicine be the next field to face a sexual harassment reckoning?" This article discusses her 2014 survey on sexual harassment and gender bias in academic medicine, as well as her recent article on the #MeToo movement as it relates to medicine in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Salomeh Michelle Salari, MS

Fellow

Sally is a fourth year medical student at the University of Michigan with the intent of specializing in Obstetrics and Gynecology. She is a member of the "Pathway of Excellence" ethics co-curricular program and is the CBSSM's second pre-doctoral clinical ethics fellow. Her interests include preventative ethics and moral distress, for which she is piloting "Moral Distress (MoD) Rounds" on non-intensive patient units at Mott Hospital.

Last Name: 
Salari

Funded by: Oregon Health & Science University, and Agency for Health Care Quality & Research

Funding Years: 2015-2017

The purpose of this study is to evaluate approximately eight grants that will test interventions to improve cardiovascular disease prevention. The investigators will collect and analyze qualitative data to identify the most effective combinations of intervention strategies. The investigators will observe grantees and selected practices to understand why and how those combinations are effective. The investigators will also gather data from the grantees to assess how effective the interventions are.

PI: Michael Fetters, MD, MPH, MA

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding years: 2009-2014

The proposed project aims to explore and examine the experiences and preferences regarding communication about positive newborn screening results of key stakeholders (parents, primary care physicians, clinical geneticists, and state newborn screening officials) involved in the three key stages: notification about the initial positive screen; follow-up testing and evaluation; and parental notification of the final results of the evaluation. For more information, visit NIH Reporter.

PI: Beth Tarini

Funded by

Funding Years: 2016-2019

This project will examine behavioral economic strategies for decreasing the use of low-value clinical services as listed in the Choose Wisely campaign. The proposed intervention, Committing to Choose Wisely (CCW), will ask clinicians to commit to avoid low-value services and provide resources to support adherence to this commitment. The intervention, which extends across two large health systems, will generate quantitative data from clinical automated data and focused medical record review data to examine rates of order before and after the intervention, as well as qualitative data from surveys and semi-structured interviews of both clinicians and patients to determine the effects of the intervention on their decision-making and experiences.

PI(s): Jeffrey Kullgren

Co-I(s): Eve Kerr

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