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Mon, March 19, 2018

The new American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) guideline for treating breast cancer patients with whole breast irradiation recommends that most patients receive an accelerated treatment, known as hypofractioned therapy, instead of the conventional one. Reshma Jagsi is co-chair of task force that compiled the guideline.

Joel Howell was honored by the American College of Physicians (ACP) at its annual convocation ceremony in April. Howell was named a new Master of the American College of Physicians for 2017-2018. Each year, a select group of these Fellows are chosen from among the nominees for Mastership by the ACP Awards Committee and approved by the ACP Board of Regents.

The Genetics in Primary Care Institute recently launched its new website, featuring co-chairperson Beth Tarini, M.D., assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Michigan’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

Along with Robert Saul, M.D., Tarini co-chairs the Institute, which aims to take genetic advances made during the last decade and help make them useful in the practice of primary care pediatrics.

The new website, www.geneticsinprimarycare.org, features information for primary care providers related to genetics testing, ethical, legal and social issues, patient communication and family history.

Tarini’s research focuses on the communication process and the health outcomes associated with genetic testing in pediatrics. She is particularly interested in pediatric population-based screening programs, such as newborn screening. Through her research, Tarini seeks to optimize communication about genetic testing between parents and providers in an effort to maximize health and minimize harm.

The UMHS press release can be found here. Dr. Tarini's featured page can be found here

Sarah Hawley, Ph.D., M.P.H., associate professor of internal medicine and a research investigator at the Ann Arbor VA, recently received a 3-year American Cancer Society grant totaling more than $850,000 for her proposal, "Population Based Study of Breast Cancer Decision Support Networks." The study will examine how informal decision supporters (e.g., partners, family, and friends) contribute decisions about surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy treatment, and how these roles may vary by race and ethnicity. The project will utilize existing resources from the Cancer Surveillance and Outcomes Research Team's (CanSORT) Program Project Grant "The Challenge of Individualizing Treatments for Patients with Breast Cancer," a $13 million award received from NCI in 2012. CanSORT and IHPI co-investigators on the study are Steven Katz, M.D., M.P.H., Nancy Janz, Ph.D., Jennifer Griggs, M.D., M.P.H., and Yun Li, Ph.D.

Thu, December 08, 2016

Reshma Jagsi, MD, discusses the risk of complications on patients receiving radiation therapy if they've had implant reconstruction. Radiation therapy may affect outcomes of breast construction, and more is needed to help patients make informed choices.

San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) Presentation Title: Impact of radiotherapy on complications and patient-reported satisfaction with breast reconstruction: Findings from the prospective multicenter MROC study

Tue, April 10, 2018

In light of the #MeToo campaign denouncing sexual assault and harassment, Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil has written a perspective piece in the New England Journal of Medicine about sexual harrassment in academic medicine. This perspective piece and a recent survey published in JAMA related to sexual harassment and gender bias in academic medicine has been highlighted in multiple media outlets.

Funded by Brigham and Women's Hospital/Boston Univerity/NIH.

Funding Years: 2010-2013. 

In this continuation of the REVEAL Study, we will conduct a new randomized clinical trial to determine the psychological and health behavior changes associated with disclosing APOE genotype and 3-year Risk estimates to persons with mild memory problems. We will also create a new instrument that clinicians and researchers can use to reliably evaluate a patient's capacity to consent to genetic testing and examine long-term impact of genetic Risk assessment by following REVEAL Study patients 2-10 years following disclosure. For more information, visit NIH Reporter Link

PI(s): J. Scott Roberts 

Funded by Department of Veterans Affairs

Funding Year: 2012

Successful diabetes management is dependent on the patient - provider partnership. However, a full discussion of potential benefits, harms, costs, and burdens associated with each medication option is often too much for a brief clinic visit. This project uses AHRQ-developed consumer guides as inspiration for a tailored program that assists with this decision-making. The current iDECIDE intervention serves as the base of the program, with updates geared toward making it more specific to veterans.

Aim 1: Update current iDECIDE program to make it more appropriate for the VA setting. 

Angela Fagerlin (PI)

Center for Health Communications Research (CHCR) Project

 

Gina Bravo, PhD

Alumni

Gina Bravo was a Visiting Scholar at CBSSM, 2011-2012. She has a PhD in mathematics and post-doctoral training in clinical epidemiology. Professor of Public Health at the University of Sherbrooke since 1991, she teaches research methods and biostatistics to MSc and PhD candidates. She is a member of the Research Centre on Aging located within the University Institute of Geriatrics of Sherbrooke. She has received personal research awards and peer-reviewed grants from the Quebec Health Research funding agency and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Last Name: 
Bravo

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding years: 2008-2013

The specific aims are: 1) To test the effectiveness of a preference-tailored (PT) vs. standard information (SI) intervention for increasing primary care patient's CRC screening adherence in a randomized controlled trial at two locations; 2) To assess the impact of the intervention on informed decision making, knowledge and attitudes toward screening, decisional outcomes, and intention to get screened; and 3) To conduct a cost effectiveness analysis of the PT intervention for increasing CRC screening. For more information, visit NIH Reporter

PI: Sarah Hawley

Co-Is: Angela Fagerlin, Victor Strecher

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