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Andrew Shuman, MD

Faculty

Andrew G. Shuman, MD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School.  He is also the Chief of the ENT Section of the Surgery Service at the VA Ann Arbor Health System.  He is a service chief of the Clinical Ethics Service in the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM).  His current research interests explore ethical issues involved in caring for patients with head and neck cancer, and in managing clinical ethics consultations among patients with cancer.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Shuman

Funded by the Greenwall Foundation

Because health care institutions are increasingly reliant on philanthropic fundraising from grateful patients, it is essential to understand public and patient perspectives about the ethical considerations in this context, including privacy and confidentiality, patient vulnerability, and physicians' conflicts of obligations.  The research team will conduct a survey to illuminate where current practices may diverge from public expectations, to focus deliberation on where policy changes may be needed.

PI: Reshma Jagsi

Fri, December 14, 2018

A new study published in JAMA finds inconsistent parental leave policies as residency programs struggle to balance well-being of trainees and the need to provide ample training. CBSSM's Director, Reshma Jagi is the senior author.

Jennifer Skillicorn, DrPH, MPH

Research Associate

Jennifer joined CBSSM in August 2017. She works with Dr. Susan Goold and community partners on grant funded research projects related to evaluating Medicaid expansion and its impact on beneficiaries through the Healthy Michigan Plan and ways in which to engage minority and underserved communities in setting priorities for community health.

Last Name: 
Skillicorn

Joseph Colbert, BA

Research Associate

Joseph joined CBSSM as a Research Area Specialist in November 2017. As a project manager, he coordinates the daily operations of Dr. Jeffrey Kullgren’s project “Provider, Patient, and Health System Effects of Provider Commitments to Choose Wisely,” a grant funded research project using novel approaches to reduce the overuse of low-value services in healthcare.

Last Name: 
Colbert
Wed, October 31, 2012

Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, recently had an article published in JAMA entitled “Gender Differences in the Salaries of Physician Researchers.” The results of the RWJ-funded study showed that male physician researchers earned $12,001 more than their female colleagues, after adjusting for a variety of factors that might impact salary. This disparity can add up to $350,000 over the course of a medical career.
Dr. Jagsi was interviewed by the Associated Press, and the article received considerable press coverage in multiple sources including the New York TimesForbes, MSNBC, and the Wall Street Journal. Click here for more information.

Wed, April 24, 2013

Angela Fagerlin is cited in a recent Reuters Health article: “Discuss cancer-reducing drugs with women – panel."

"For a woman who starts out with a one in 40 chance of developing cancer, she told Reuters Health, "Your risk goes from 2.5 to 1.25 (percent). It's a 1 percent difference in your risk of breast cancer, having to take a drug every day for five years that has some side effects."

But for some women who have a much higher short-term risk of breast cancer - as high as 16 percent - the drugs are more likely to be worth potential side effects, said Fagerlin, who wasn't involved in the new review or the Task Force decision.

Research Topics: 
Fri, February 21, 2014

Dr. Reshma Jagsi was involved with a study that reported an increase in women who recieved breast reconstruction following a masectomy for breast cancer. The study found that, "46 percent of patients received reconstruction in 1998 but that figure rose to 63 percent by 2007." Jagsi said, "Breast reconstruction has a big impact on quality of life for breast cancer survivors. As we are seeing more women survive breast cancer, we need to focus on long term survivorship issues and ensuring that women have access to this important part of treatment."

Mon, January 05, 2015

Reshma Jagsi was interviewed by mCancerTalk for the article, “Is your course of radiation treatment longer than it needs to be?” which focuses on two of her radiation treatment studies. In one of her studies, looking at a national database of patients, she and her colleagues found that hypofractionated radiation therapy was used in only 13.6% of Medicare patients with breast cancer. In Michigan, Jagsi’s other study found, fewer than one-third of patients who fit the criteria for offering this approach got the shorter course of treatment.

Read Dr. Jagsi’s paper about hypofractionation use nationally and in Michigan.

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