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Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2011-2016

Disorders of Sex Development are defined as congenital conditions in which development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sex is atypical. One of the most defining moments of our lives is when, in the womb, we embark on a male or female path. Disruption of typical male or female development, whether mild or severe, results in DSD, which occur quite frequently, in about 1% of the human population. DSD are extremely stressful for parents and, as they grow older, the affected person and are often accompanied by additional medical and psychological problems; yet little is known about the causes of DSD and what healthcare teams should do in the short and long term. This project proposes to design a way to learn about the genetic causes and the psychological consequences of DSD, and to use these data to provide healthcare teams with procedures to evaluate and improve care for these patients and their families.

PI(s): David Sandberg

Co-I(s):  Eric Vilain, Edward Goldman

Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2011-2017

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a progressive and debilitating disease that often causes hand deformities that impair hand function. A common deformity is at the metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPJs) to cause ulnar drift and extension lag of the fingers. This study follows the world's largest cohort of over 160 RA patients prospectively for 3 years. The short-term (1-year) results have been analyzed for the cohort and have confirmed that the SMPA procedure is highly effective in correcting ulnar drift and improving hand function based on outcomes questionnaire assessments, whereas the medically-treated control group's hand function remains unchanged. The data for year 3 of this project are currently being analyzed. We are proposing to follow this unique cohort for an additional 4 years to assess the long-term outcomes of SMPA, to study the natural history of RA hand disease treated nonoperatively, and to determine predictors of long-term outcomes. This study seeks to define the optimal treatment of this RA hand condition and to provide evidence in guiding hand surgery treatment for this prevalent disease.

PI(s): Kevin Chung

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim

Funded by Department of Defense - Department of the Army

Funding Years: 2012-2016

This study will test a tissue equivalent ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalent (EVPOME), which is your own cells grown on top of a piece of AlloDerm (a commercially available freeze dried human cadaver tissue that is routinely used in present day surgical reconstructive procedures) to create a new piece of soft tissue for use only in your body. The tissue equivalent product will be tested against a non-experimental method of grafts, the gold standard a piece of palatal oral mucosa (POM) to see which works best. Patients will be randomly assigned to receive either the EVPOME or POM to cover the defect in their mouths. The objective of the study is to assess the safety and efficacy for the use of human EVPOME for soft tissue intraoral grafting procedures compared to the "gold standard" palatal oral mucosa (POM) graft.

PI(s): Stephen Feinberg, Robert Eber

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim, William Giannobile

Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Learning Health Systems Symposium

Fri, November 18, 2016, 8:30am to 3:30pm
Location: 
Taubman Biomedical Science Research Building (BSRB) 109 Zina Pitcher Place

This symposium will promote dialogue and contribute to a research agenda on how learning health system organizers should engage the ethical, legal and social implications of this work.

The next generation of health information technology organizes data into large, networked systems to address challenges of U.S. health systems: spiraling costs, poor health outcomes, safety issues, unproductive research enterprises, and failure to implement known clinical best practices. More than simply “Big Data,” these systems are arranged as “learning health systems,” multi-stakeholder federations that gather and analyze data to create useful knowledge that is disseminated to all stakeholders. Harnessing the power of health data for learning strains ethical, legal, and social paradigms for how health information should be collected, stored, accessed, used, and destroyed.

CBSSM is a co-sponsor, along with the Brehm Center, the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR), the School of Public Health, and Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS).

EVENT REGISTRATION

Jacquelyn Miller, MA

Research Associate

Jackie re-joined CBSSM in spring of 2017. She currently works with Drs. Lesly Dossett and Tom Valley on projects related to the worries and concerns of those with loved ones in the ICU, feedback and disclosure of errors that have occurred in other hospital systems, and opioid prescribing after cancer surgery. She has a BS in Environmental Policy and Developing Country Studies (University of Michigan, School of Natural Resources and Environment) and a MA in Sociology, specializing in environmental justice, feminist sociology, and science and technology studies (Michigan State University).

Last Name: 
Miller
Mon, April 17, 2017

A new piece by Brian Zikmund-Fisher and former CBSSM post-doc, Laura Scherer is out in the Conversation, "Maximizers vs. minimizers: The personality trait that may guide your medical decisions – and costs." They developed and validated a 10-item questionnaire that assesses a person’s maximizing or minimizing tendencies on a scale, from one (strong minimizing) to seven (strong maximizing). Across four studies, they found this difference predicts health care use across a range of medical interventions and health problems, from cancer screening preferences to vaccination. They hope that identifying variations in maximizing or minimizing tendencies may be useful in trying to address both overuse and underuse in health care.

Research Topics: 

Submit Your Paper for Consideration in the ASBH Student Paper Competition

If you are a student who would like to be considered for the Student Paper Award, please send your paper to the ASBH office in an electronic format (Word or PDF) to candersen@asbh.org, with “ASBH Student Paper Competition” in the subject line.  All papers need to be received at the ASBH office by July 15, 2013 to be considered.    The Awards Committee will review and rank all submissions.  The top three papers will be placed in a special session at the Annual Meeting, and one winner will be chosen at the meeting by the Awards Committee. The award will be presented during the Members’ meeting.

All papers will be assessed anonymously.  Do not include identifying information in your paper submissions, such as title pages with your name. Previous winners are not eligible for consideration. Eligible papers should be no more than 3500 words in length. A student is defined as one who is actively pursuing an advanced degree and has not received a doctoral-level degree (e.g., MD, PhD, JD or equivalent degree). Authors who are not students according to the definition above are not eligible for the Student Paper Award. Coauthored papers are eligible only if all authors are students.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the ASBH office at: info@asbh.org

Thank you,
 
American Society for Bioethics + Humanities (ASBH)
Phone: 847-375-4745

www.asbh.org

 

Funded by the National Cancer Institute

Funding Years: 2010-2012

Approximately 10-30% of men who undergo external beam radiation for localized prostate cancer see rising PSA scores following treatment. Some of these men need androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) as salvage treatment. ADT is not curative and has significant side effects that impact quality of life (QOL). These facts must be balanced against its clinical need.

The decision to initiate hormonal therapy is driven more by patient anxiety and less by clinical parameters. Thus, men need to better understand how their PSA values and likelihood of recurrence will change over time.

A novel computer model, based on 2,386 patients previously treated, will provide this information. This project aims to develop and test methods of communicating this information to patients and to determine how patients use it in their treatment decisions. 

Aim 1. Develop several graphical methods for presenting the key pieces of numerical information in regard to predicted PSA response and clinical failure.

Aim 2: Pilot test the materials in urology and RT clinics to determine the best method for communicating the information to patients. Based on pilot testing, choose one graphical format for further evaluation.

Aim 3: Using the identified graphical format, test the use of these materials in encounters with patients who are actually making decisions regarding ADT. We assess anxiety, knowledge, risk perceptions, actual behavior in regard to ADT, self-efficacy for making a treatment decision, and satisfaction with the tool.

Daniel Hamstra (PI), Doris R. Brown (Co-I), Angela Fagerlin (Co-I), Shruti Jolly (Co-I), Karin Olson (Co-I), John Wei (Co-I).

 

Funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Funding Years: 2012-2013.

Diabetes is a complex, chronic disease encompassing many domains of treatment. VHA and others have created diabetes guidelines to help support providers and patients in making choices about optimal treatment approaches. However, most guidelines are broad in nature, and offer relatively little guidance on how to personalize care in order to maximize treatment benefits, minimize the intensity and negative effects of treatment, and best align with individual treatment preferences. 

We will test the effectiveness of a personalized decision support program. Our long term goals are:

  • To test and implement a decision support program, including decision coaching supported by an interactive, personalized decision support tool, in clinical practice via our Patient-Aligned Care Team (PACT) laboratory.
  • To assess the impact of personalized decision support on patient-centeredness, patient satisfaction, and the effectiveness of risk communication and treatment decision making.

We propose an interventional study to examine the effectiveness of personalized decision support. The intervention will consist of two key components: a decision coach  and a personalized diabetes decision support tool. The decision support tool has mostly been developed via AHRQ and local pilot funding mechanisms, and is informed by personalized estimation of treatment benefits for blood glucose, blood pressure, and lipid treatment based on extensive modeling work done by our investigative team. The personalized benefit information is communicated through graphical risk communication methods (pictographs).  

PI(s): Angela Fagerlin 

Funded by National Institutes of Health.

Funding Years: 2013-2018.

This research study addresses two questions. How do social relationships and social support change with age? And when are social relationships most beneficial or harmful to health? To do this we examine three waves of the Social Relations, Age and Health study spanning more than 20 years, analyzing detailed changes in social relations using both monthly assessments and multiple informants.

Specifically, this study (1) tests competing theories about age, social relations and health; (2) specifies the direction and shape of change in social relations over time; (3) tests the relative strength of the three hypothesized mechanisms of social contagion: induction, homophily, and shared environmental factors; and (4) examines competing exchange theories, e.g. altruism, developmental stake, support bank, well as their association with health disparities.

Study findings will impact scholarship by identifying how social relations change with age; the links between social relations and health; and how specific characteristics of social relations – cross-sectionally and longitudinally – influence the stress-health link and social disparities. We also hope to impact public policy with attention to social relations intervention programs that reduce long-term risk and increase protective factors.

PI(s): Toni Antonucci

Co-I(s): Kristine Ajrouch, Kira Birditt, Kai Cortina, Mick Couper, Richard Gonzales, 

 

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