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Emily Chen, MA

Research Associate

Emily Chen joined CBSSM in February 2016 and works with Drs. Julie Wright and Darin Zahuranec on several grant funded research projects on developing decision aids and family perspectives in decision making. Prior to moving to Michigan, Emily worked on several studies regarding mindfulness and cognitive styles at Harvard University. Emily received her BS in Atmospheric Science and a certificate in Neurobiology and Cognitive Science from National Taiwan University. She went on to receive her MA in Psychology from Boston University.

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Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 1995-1999

This project was formed with the intent of giving citizens, at the grass roots level, the opportunity to help shape the kinds of policies which will govern the use of genetic technology in the future. The two principal project goals are 1.) utilizing “rational democratic deliberation” to develop recommendations for the three policy domains - laws, professional standards, and institutional policies - regarding the use and application of genome research and technology; and 2.) To disseminate the findings to the public, policymakers, health educators, and practitioners.

PI: Toby Citrin

Co-I: Edward Goldman

Funded by Kaiser Permanente Research Foundation Institute

Funding Years: 2014 - 2015.

This retrospective cohort study will assess the association of BPH treatment (5ARI and alpha-blocker medications) with the occurrence of prostate cancer related mortality. An electronic algorithm for classifying prostate cancer related deaths will be created and validated using medical records. This study will also assess a number of secondary endpoints including the occurrence of prostate cancer and metastatic prostate cancer, cardiovascular and all cause mortality.

PI(s): Sarah Hawley, Lauren Wallner (Sponsor PI)

Funded by Veterans Education Research Association of Michigan

Funding Years: 2010-2016

This research study aims to compare the effectiveness of two proven treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): Prolonged Exposure (PE), sertraline, and their combination. In addition, the investigators are examining predictors of response to these two treatments and how PTSD symptoms, thoughts, and biological factors may be changed by such treatments. Biological mechanisms of change are also examined including emotion processing and regulation in fMRI, HPA axis function, and genetics and genomics. The investigators are also examining acceptability of each treatment and reasons for ending treatment.

PI(s): Sheila Rauch

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim

Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2011-2016

The MROC Study seeks to evaluate and compare from the patient's point of view the leading options for breast reconstruction after mastectomy. This study will help patients, physicians, payers and policy makers better understand the various surgeries available for breast reconstruction. Although many women choose reconstruction, the number of options as well as their pros and cons can make decision making difficult and stressful. From this research, we hope to learn more about what works best for patients undergoing these operations.

PI: Edwin Wilkins

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, June 22, 2016, 12:00pm
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Timothy Johnson, MD

"Ethical global health engagement: the Michigan Women's Health Model"

Millennial learners are experiencing and want to engage in global issues.  As institutions develop opportunities for their students, ethical issues need to be considered.  Transnational, transcultural, and translational issues as well as issues of equity, bilateral gain, economic transparency, academic values and sustainability must be factored into academic institutional partnerships between Western and low income countries.  The Ghana experience will be used to develop the concept of a “Michigan Model”.

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, July 27, 2016, 12:00pm
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Kunal Bailoor, MD Candidate Class of 2018, Ethics Path of Excellence

"Advance Care Planning: Beyond Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA)"

Abstract: Advance care planning is a crucial part of end of life medical care. It can take many forms, including designation of a surrogate decision maker via a DPOA document. However it can also involve living wills, physicians orders for life sustaining treatment (POLSTs), or even simply clinician patient conversation. The newly revised hospital policy on advance directives reflects this broader approach. The talk will include a brief review of the philosophical and ethical basis of advance care planning before diving into a discussion of the new hospital policy and it's impact on practice.


Wed, May 18, 2016

Reshma Jagsi’s survey of high-achieving physician-scientists published in JAMA, found that nearly a third of women reported experiencing sexual harassment. As women now make up about half of medical school students, the researchers emphasize the importance of recognizing unconscious bias as well as overtly inappropriate behaviors.

1. Reshma Jagsi, Kent A. Griffith, Rochelle Jones, Chithra R. Perumalswami, Peter Ubel, Abigail Stewart. Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Experiences of Academic Medical Faculty. JAMA, 2016; 315 (19): 2120 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.2188

Research Topics: 
Fri, December 09, 2016

Kenneth Langa's national study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, was cited in a New York Times article discussing US dementia trends. Despite concern that dementia rates were increasing, Langa found that it is actually decreasing. He found that population brain health seemed to improve between 2000 and 2012 and that increasing educational attainment and better control of cardiovascular risk factors may have contributed to the improvement. However, the full set of social, behavioral, and medical factors contributing to the improvement is still uncertain.

Research Topics: 

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Sarah Hawley, Reshma Jagsi and others were recently published in a JAMA Oncology research letter on breast cancer patient risk communication. They found that medical oncologists were found to be far more likely than surgeons to quantify risk estimates for patients and that patients who do not see a medical oncologist may make treatment decisions, including surgery, without all relevant risk information.

For the full article: