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Funded by Kaiser Permanente Research Foundation Institute

Funding Years: 2014 - 2015.

This retrospective cohort study will assess the association of BPH treatment (5ARI and alpha-blocker medications) with the occurrence of prostate cancer related mortality. An electronic algorithm for classifying prostate cancer related deaths will be created and validated using medical records. This study will also assess a number of secondary endpoints including the occurrence of prostate cancer and metastatic prostate cancer, cardiovascular and all cause mortality.

PI(s): Sarah Hawley, Lauren Wallner (Sponsor PI)

Funded by Veterans Education Research Association of Michigan

Funding Years: 2010-2016

This research study aims to compare the effectiveness of two proven treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): Prolonged Exposure (PE), sertraline, and their combination. In addition, the investigators are examining predictors of response to these two treatments and how PTSD symptoms, thoughts, and biological factors may be changed by such treatments. Biological mechanisms of change are also examined including emotion processing and regulation in fMRI, HPA axis function, and genetics and genomics. The investigators are also examining acceptability of each treatment and reasons for ending treatment.

PI(s): Sheila Rauch

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim

Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2011-2016

The MROC Study seeks to evaluate and compare from the patient's point of view the leading options for breast reconstruction after mastectomy. This study will help patients, physicians, payers and policy makers better understand the various surgeries available for breast reconstruction. Although many women choose reconstruction, the number of options as well as their pros and cons can make decision making difficult and stressful. From this research, we hope to learn more about what works best for patients undergoing these operations.

PI: Edwin Wilkins

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim

2014 Bishop Lecture featuring Myra Christopher

Thu, May 15, 2014 (All day)
Location: 
Vandenberg Meeting Hall (2nd floor), The Michigan Hall, 911 N. University, Ann Arbor, MI.

The CBSSM Research Colloquium featured the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as the keynote address.  Myra Christopher presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: "The Moral Imperative to Transform the Way Pain is Perceived, Judged and Treated".

Myra Christopher holds the Kathleen M. Foley Chair in Pain and Palliative Care at the Center for Practical Bioethics.  Prior to December 2011, Ms. 

Christopher was President and CEO of the Center for Practical Bioethics since its inception in 1984.  From 1998-2003, Christopher also served as the national program officer of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s National Program Office for State-based Initiatives to Improve End-of Life Care which was housed at the Center.  These roles have allowed Christopher to continue her lifelong mission to improve care for those who are seriously ill and their families.

Since the late 1990s, Christopher has expanded the scope of her work to include the under treatment of chronic pain.  She is currently the Director of the Pain Action Initiative: A National Strategy (PAINS) and serves as Chair of the PAINS Steering Committee. From 2010-2011 she served as a member of Pain Study Committee at the Institute of Medicine focused on the under-treatment of pain.  In 2012 she was appointed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sibelius, to the Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee (IPRCC) at the National Institutes of Health. In that capacity, she also serves on the Oversight Committee for the National Pain Strategy Task Force. 

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) Research Colloquium was held Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Vandenberg Meeting Hall (2nd floor), The Michigan League, 911 N. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

Wed, May 28, 2014

A recent study led by Dr. Sarah Hawley has found that most women who get a double mastectomy to prevent breast cancer don’t need to do it, and are often motivated by fear. Her study has been receiving national press and has been featured in NBC News, CBS News, the Chicago Tribune, MSN, and many, many other venues. Reshma Jagsi and several others were co-authors on this study.

Tanner Caverly and colleagues performed a systematic review to determine how U.S. cancer prevention and screening recommendations present the potential benefits and harms associated with the procedures. They found that 69% of recommendation statements either did not quantify benefits and harms or presented them in an asymmetric manner. They conclude that improved presentation of benefits and harms in guidelines would better ensure that clinicians and patients have access to the information required for making informed decisions.

Caverly TJ, Hayward RA, Reamer E, Zikmund-Fisher BJ, Connochie 2, Heisler M, Fagerlin A. Presentation of Benefits and Harms in US Cancer Screening and Prevention Guidelines: Systematic Review. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2016 Feb 24;108(6). pii: djv436. doi: 10.1093/jnci/djv436.
 

Research Topics: 
Wed, February 15, 2017

According to a study by Reshma Jagsi and colleagues, doctors often fail to recommend genetic testing for breast-cancer patients, even those who are at high risk for mutations linked to ovarian and other cancers. They surveyed 2,529 breast-cancer patients and found that although two-thirds of the women reported wanting genetic testing, less than a third actually got it. About 8 in 10 women at highest risk for BRCA mutations — because of family history or ancestry — said they had wanted testing, but only a little more than half received it.

"Concussion" Film Screening & Moderated Discussion

Thu, March 30, 2017, 7:00pm
Location: 
Forum Hall, Palmer Commons

"Concussion" Film Screening & Moderated Discussion

Free Admission

Moderator:    Raymond De Vries, PhD

Panelists:    

  • Ellen Arruda, PhD, Professor, Mechanical Engineering
  • Karen Kelly-Blake, PhD, Assistant Professor, Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences, MSU
  • Matthew Lorincz, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Neurology, Co-Director, Michigan NeuroSport

Refreshments provided.

Join us for a free screening of the award-winning film, Concussion. Watch the true story of Dr. Bennet Omalu, renowned forensic pathologist who discovered chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), acclaimed as, "a gripping medical mystery and a dazzling portrait of the young scientist no one wanted to listen to." 

The film will be followed by a panel discussion related to key bioethical and scientific issues brought up by the film, as well as current research into brain injury and brain injury prevention.

Jodyn Platt, MPH, PhD, Assistant Professor of Learning Health Sciences, has been named a University of Chicago MacLean Fellow.

As part of the one year Cancer Genomics and Ethics Big Data Science Fellowship she will receive clinical training in the Medical Ethics Summer Intensive Program and conduct a research project with Olufunmilayo Olopade, MD, FACP, Director of the Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics at University of Chicago Medicine.

Platt explains how her work as a fellow will begin: "I would like to systematically observe and interview individuals involved in shaping how data evolves and moves from the patient encounter to the big data enterprise and back to clinical care." Looking forward to expanding her network over the course of the year, she plans "to engage in, and lead, interdisciplinary scholarship that will ensure the revolution in healthcare delivery brought on by big data and cancer genomics is an ethical one." 

Platt is also the organizer of the upcoming ELSI-LHS symposium on November 15th at U-M which explores the “Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Learning Health Systems”.

Funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs

Funding Year: 2011

A current priority for VA research is "Healthcare Informatics to Improve Veteran Care Healthcare." This priority area recognizes the critical importance of developing effective technological tools for Veterans to improve their understanding of and capacity to be actively involved in shared decision making about key health issues. Making The Choice - VA will develop new materials specifically for VA patients who have prostate cancer. The tool will help in shared and informed decision-making related to prostate cancer treatment options and outcomes. 

Aim 1. Develop a web-based platform that will support informed shared decision making for patients. The focus will be prostate cancer treatment options.

Aim 2. Use values clarification method, conjoint analysis, in this first iteration of the platform.

Angela Fagerlin (PI)

Center for Health Communications Research (CHCR)

 

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