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Funded by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality

Funding Years: 2010-2011

This study will evaluate a broad-based collaboration between the largest insurer in Michigan (BCBSM) and physician organizations throughout the state to implement components of the Patient-Centered Medical Home, and will provide valuable lessons for PCMH initiatives throughout the country. Because of the wide range of independent practices of varying structure, demographics, and geographic locations participating in this collaboration, the lessons learned from this study will provide greater external validity for the vast majority of primary care practices than do the experiences of large, integrated health systems with employed physician staff and centralized administrative control. Results from this study could also help primary care teams prepare for their journey toward a fully- functioning PCMH by preparing them in advance for challenges that may arise during PCMH implementation, and having information on how others have overcome those challenges.

UM Affiliated Investigators: Michael Fetters (PI), Lee Green (Co-I), Jeffrey Alexander (Co-I).

More details can be found at NIH Reporter.

Funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Funding Years: 2011-2016. 

While substantial progress has occurred recognizing community expertise in Research, and involving Communities in Decisions about Research aims and methods, community influence on Research Funding priorities remains limited. Building on experience with developing, Testing and using the successful CHAT (Choosing Healthplans All Together) tool, we plan to modify an existing priority setting simulation exercise to develop a tool to engage minority and underserved Communities in setting priorities for clinical and translational Research, evaluate it from the perspective of those who participate, and examine the extent to which it actually influences Research priorities. This tool could be valuable to Research Funding organizations, community-academic partnerships, community organizations asked to participate in Research, and others aiming to engage Communities in Research. For more information, visit NIH Reporter

PI(s): Susan Goold

Co-I(s): Kathryn Moseley 

 

Funded by National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2011-2017

The CoreValve US Pivotal Trial applies clinical best practices—including CT-based sizing—and is meticulously monitored, including the use of an independent echocardiographic core lab. Within the trial, the High Risk Study randomized 795 patients between surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) with the CoreValve System across 45 US sites. The TAVI procedure is used as an alternative to open heart surgery and allows access to the diseased aortic valve via an artery in the leg and is designed for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for surgery due to age or other health issues.

PI(s): David Bach, G M Deeb

Co-I(s): Devin Brown, Stanley Chetcuti, Paul Grossman, Himanshu Patel, Michael Shea, Darin Zahuranec

Funded by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

Funding Years: 2015-2016

The central objective of the Healthy Michigan Plan is to improve the health and well-being of Michigan residents by extending health care coverage to low-income adults who are uninsured or underinsured. The program also introduces a number of reforms, including cost-sharing for individuals with incomes above the Federal Poverty Level, the creation of individual MI Health Accounts to record health care expenses and cost-sharing contributions, and opportunities for beneficiaries to reduce their cost-sharing by completing health risk assessments and engaging in healthy behaviors. This project conducts the evaluation of Michigan's Medicaid expansion, the Healthy Michigan Plan (HMP).

PI(s): John Ayanian

Co-I(s): Tammy Chang, Sarah Clark, Matthew Davis, A M Fendrick, Susan Goold, Adrianne Haggins, Richard Hirth, Edith Kieffer, Jeffrey Kullgren, Sunghee Lee, Ann-Marie Rosland

Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2011-2017

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a progressive and debilitating disease that often causes hand deformities that impair hand function. A common deformity is at the metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPJs) to cause ulnar drift and extension lag of the fingers. This study follows the world's largest cohort of over 160 RA patients prospectively for 3 years. The short-term (1-year) results have been analyzed for the cohort and have confirmed that the SMPA procedure is highly effective in correcting ulnar drift and improving hand function based on outcomes questionnaire assessments, whereas the medically-treated control group's hand function remains unchanged. The data for year 3 of this project are currently being analyzed. We are proposing to follow this unique cohort for an additional 4 years to assess the long-term outcomes of SMPA, to study the natural history of RA hand disease treated nonoperatively, and to determine predictors of long-term outcomes. This study seeks to define the optimal treatment of this RA hand condition and to provide evidence in guiding hand surgery treatment for this prevalent disease.

PI(s): Kevin Chung

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim

Funded by Department of Defense - Department of the Army

Funding Years: 2012-2016

This study will test a tissue equivalent ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalent (EVPOME), which is your own cells grown on top of a piece of AlloDerm (a commercially available freeze dried human cadaver tissue that is routinely used in present day surgical reconstructive procedures) to create a new piece of soft tissue for use only in your body. The tissue equivalent product will be tested against a non-experimental method of grafts, the gold standard a piece of palatal oral mucosa (POM) to see which works best. Patients will be randomly assigned to receive either the EVPOME or POM to cover the defect in their mouths. The objective of the study is to assess the safety and efficacy for the use of human EVPOME for soft tissue intraoral grafting procedures compared to the "gold standard" palatal oral mucosa (POM) graft.

PI(s): Stephen Feinberg, Robert Eber

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim, William Giannobile

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2011-2016

The CCC creates the NETT Network infrastructure to promote and conduct clinical trials that will provide new and effective treatments for neurologic emergencies by: Developing the Network architecture and organizational structure including bylaws and procedures; Establishing processes to design and implement trials that will encourage the clinical translation of findings into routine practice; Managing clinical trials (establish rigorous criteria for monitoring recruitment, adhere to established deadlines and develop criteria for monitoring Hub effectiveness and compliance); Providing clinical trial operational resources (electronic data entry, automated screening and notification, access to telemedicine resources, advanced outcomes assessment, and human subjects protection tools); Creating an information technology infrastructure that will enhance the efficiency, speed, and accuracy of site, trial, and data management in the Network; Establishing trial development structures (recruit future trials and investigators, define internal review and publication procedures).

PI(s): Bill Barsan

Co-I(s): Lewis Morgenstern, Art Pancioli, Robert Silbergleit

Tanner Caverly, MD, MPH

Faculty

Tanner Caverly has been a general internist and Health Services Research Fellow at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center and a Clinical Lecturer at the University of Michigan Medical School since July 2013. He graduated from medical school at The Ohio State University School of Medicine and Public Health, and subsequently traveled to the University of Colorado, where he completed internal medicine residency training, a year as Chief Medical Resident, and a Primary Care Research Fellowship / Masters in Public Health.

Last Name: 
Caverly

Funded by Harvard & NIH

Funding Years: 2015-2016

This study will use CBPR mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative data collection) to conduct needs assessments and design and evaluate a core family-based intervention. Project activities will emphasize capacity building in two refugee communities resettled in Greater Boston—the Somali Bantu and the Bhutanese—actively engaging refugee community members, community advisory boards, services providers, and other stakeholders. Specific Aims are to: (1) deepen partnerships with the Somali Bantu and Bhutanese communities through co-leadership, capacity-building, and knowledge sharing; (2) collect and apply qualitative data to (a) prepare a needs assessment of mental health in children and adolescents, barriers to care, and services preferences with each target refugee group; (b) develop mental health/psychosocial assessments for refugee caregivers and children; (c) adapt the core components of a family-based strengthening intervention for use with refugees; and (3) conduct an 80-family pilot study to examine acceptability and sustainability of the intervention. Key outcomes will be reduced mental health symptoms among children and adolescents and improvement in caregiver-child relationships

 

PI: Michael Fetters, MD. MPH. MA

Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Learning Health Systems Symposium

Fri, November 18, 2016, 8:30am to 3:30pm
Location: 
Taubman Biomedical Science Research Building (BSRB) 109 Zina Pitcher Place

This symposium will promote dialogue and contribute to a research agenda on how learning health system organizers should engage the ethical, legal and social implications of this work.

The next generation of health information technology organizes data into large, networked systems to address challenges of U.S. health systems: spiraling costs, poor health outcomes, safety issues, unproductive research enterprises, and failure to implement known clinical best practices. More than simply “Big Data,” these systems are arranged as “learning health systems,” multi-stakeholder federations that gather and analyze data to create useful knowledge that is disseminated to all stakeholders. Harnessing the power of health data for learning strains ethical, legal, and social paradigms for how health information should be collected, stored, accessed, used, and destroyed.

CBSSM is a co-sponsor, along with the Brehm Center, the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR), the School of Public Health, and Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS).

EVENT REGISTRATION

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