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Tanner Caverly, MD, MPH

Faculty

Tanner Caverly has been a general internist and Health Services Research Fellow at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center and a Clinical Lecturer at the University of Michigan Medical School since July 2013. He graduated from medical school at The Ohio State University School of Medicine and Public Health, and subsequently traveled to the University of Colorado, where he completed internal medicine residency training, a year as Chief Medical Resident, and a Primary Care Research Fellowship / Masters in Public Health.

Last Name: 
Caverly

Andrew Shuman, MD

Faculty

Andrew G. Shuman, MD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School.  He is also the Chief of the ENT Section of the Surgery Service at the VA Ann Arbor Health System.  He serves as Co-Director of the Program in Clinical Ethics in the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM).  His current research interests explore ethical issues involved in caring for patients with head and neck cancer, and in managing clinical ethics consultations among patients with cancer.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Shuman

Christian Vercler, MD, MA

Faculty

Christian Vercler is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatric Plastic Surgery at the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. Dr. Vercler has a special interest in ethics in surgery and he holds master's degrees in both Theology and Bioethics. He has a passion for teaching medical students and residents and has won teaching awards from Emory University Medical School, Harvard Medical School, and the University of Michigan.

Last Name: 
Vercler

Funded by Harvard & NIH

Funding Years: 2015-2016

This study will use CBPR mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative data collection) to conduct needs assessments and design and evaluate a core family-based intervention. Project activities will emphasize capacity building in two refugee communities resettled in Greater Boston—the Somali Bantu and the Bhutanese—actively engaging refugee community members, community advisory boards, services providers, and other stakeholders. Specific Aims are to: (1) deepen partnerships with the Somali Bantu and Bhutanese communities through co-leadership, capacity-building, and knowledge sharing; (2) collect and apply qualitative data to (a) prepare a needs assessment of mental health in children and adolescents, barriers to care, and services preferences with each target refugee group; (b) develop mental health/psychosocial assessments for refugee caregivers and children; (c) adapt the core components of a family-based strengthening intervention for use with refugees; and (3) conduct an 80-family pilot study to examine acceptability and sustainability of the intervention. Key outcomes will be reduced mental health symptoms among children and adolescents and improvement in caregiver-child relationships

 

PI: Michael Fetters, MD. MPH. MA

Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Learning Health Systems Symposium

Fri, November 18, 2016, 8:30am to 3:30pm
Location: 
Taubman Biomedical Science Research Building (BSRB) 109 Zina Pitcher Place

This symposium will promote dialogue and contribute to a research agenda on how learning health system organizers should engage the ethical, legal and social implications of this work.

The next generation of health information technology organizes data into large, networked systems to address challenges of U.S. health systems: spiraling costs, poor health outcomes, safety issues, unproductive research enterprises, and failure to implement known clinical best practices. More than simply “Big Data,” these systems are arranged as “learning health systems,” multi-stakeholder federations that gather and analyze data to create useful knowledge that is disseminated to all stakeholders. Harnessing the power of health data for learning strains ethical, legal, and social paradigms for how health information should be collected, stored, accessed, used, and destroyed.

CBSSM is a co-sponsor, along with the Brehm Center, the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR), the School of Public Health, and Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS).

EVENT REGISTRATION

Jacquelyn Miller, MA

Research Associate

Jackie re-joined CBSSM in spring of 2017. She currently works with Drs. Lesly Dossett and Tom Valley on projects related to the worries and concerns of those with loved ones in the ICU, feedback and disclosure of errors that have occurred in other hospital systems, and opioid prescribing after cancer surgery. She has a BS in Environmental Policy and Developing Country Studies (University of Michigan, School of Natural Resources and Environment) and a MA in Sociology, specializing in environmental justice, feminist sociology, and science and technology studies (Michigan State University).

Last Name: 
Miller

Submit Your Paper for Consideration in the ASBH Student Paper Competition

If you are a student who would like to be considered for the Student Paper Award, please send your paper to the ASBH office in an electronic format (Word or PDF) to candersen@asbh.org, with “ASBH Student Paper Competition” in the subject line.  All papers need to be received at the ASBH office by July 15, 2013 to be considered.    The Awards Committee will review and rank all submissions.  The top three papers will be placed in a special session at the Annual Meeting, and one winner will be chosen at the meeting by the Awards Committee. The award will be presented during the Members’ meeting.

All papers will be assessed anonymously.  Do not include identifying information in your paper submissions, such as title pages with your name. Previous winners are not eligible for consideration. Eligible papers should be no more than 3500 words in length. A student is defined as one who is actively pursuing an advanced degree and has not received a doctoral-level degree (e.g., MD, PhD, JD or equivalent degree). Authors who are not students according to the definition above are not eligible for the Student Paper Award. Coauthored papers are eligible only if all authors are students.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the ASBH office at: info@asbh.org

Thank you,
 
American Society for Bioethics + Humanities (ASBH)
Phone: 847-375-4745

www.asbh.org

 

Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2014 - 2019.

The Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) Project is an ongoing stroke surveillance study that began in 1999. BASIC is the only ongoing stroke surveillance project focusing on Mexican Americans. Mexican Americans are the largest segment of the Hispanic American population, the United States' largest minority group. Since the inception of this project, we have assembled a cohort of over 4,992 cerebrovascular disease patients whom we are able to follow for recurrent cerebrovascular events as well as mortality. This gives us tremendous power to detect associations with biological and social risk factors for stroke, important to Mexican Americans as well as the broader United States population. We have demonstrated increased stroke incidence and recurrence in Mexican Americans. Stroke severity and ischemic stroke subtypes are similar between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Mortality following stroke appears to be less in Mexican Americans. In the next five years we are positioned to delineate trends in stroke rates, and to explore the potential reasons for the increased stroke burden in Mexican Americans, as well as their improved survival. This information will be critically important to all populations to reduce the devastation of stroke. We will continue to make important observations useful for planning delivery of stroke care in communities. For the first time we will investigate functional and cognitive outcome following stroke in Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites.

PI(s): Lynda Lisabeth, Lewis Morgenstern

Co-I(s): Brisa Sanchez

Funded by American Medical Sleep Foundation

Funding Years: 2015-2018

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a well-recognized risk factor for serious health consequences and increased health care expenditures, but the impact of OSA under-recognition and under-treatment on outcomes and healthcare utilization patterns on a national level remains largely unstudied, particularly among the elderly. Research that characterizes the scope and impact of OSA under-recognition across the U.S. - and barriers to its diagnosis and treatment - is needed to develop strategies that will optimize medical outcomes for Americans with OSA. This proposal aims to identify critical gaps in the identification and treatment of OSA in the U.S., and determine the extent to which such gaps influence outcomes and healthcare utilization. This study will be facilitated though analysis of Medicare 5% datasets, and the National Health and Aging Trends Study - a newly available survey of Medicare beneficiaries that focuses on health outcomes in adults age 65 and older, linked to Medicare claims data. This approach will allow us to characterize national trends in OSA recognition and treatment, clarify relationships between OSA and health outcomes; and identify barriers to improving OSA-related consequences. Ultimately, this project will inform future research directed at improving cost-effective strategies to ameliorate medical and economic consequences of OSA.

PI(s): Tiffany Braley, James Burke

Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2011-2017)

In the United States, over 300,000 individuals over age 65 suffer from distal radius fractures (DRFs) each year. Despite the frequency of this injury and over 200 years of experience treating DRFs, management of elderly DRFs is still controversial. Close reduction and casting is a nonsurgical technique that is frequently used, but osteoporotic fractures, common in the elderly, often collapse and displace. The three currently applied surgical techniques are close reduction and percutaneous pinning, external fixation with or without percutaneous pinning, and internal fixation with volar locking plating. Preliminary evidence indicates that locking plate fixation can permit elderly patients to move their hands and wrists much sooner in order to return to self-care activities more quickly. Although these outcomes are promising, there is no randomized controlled clinical trial to demonstrate that the more invasive, and perhaps more costly, plating technique is superior to the other simpler approaches. The aim of this randomized controlled trial is to compare outcomes of these three surgical techniques in treating unstable DRFs in the elderly. The secondary aim is to follow a cohort of elderly patients who choose not to have surgery to evaluate outcomes following treatment by close reduction and casting alone. This clinical trial is the most ambitious study in hand surgery by assembling most of the leading centers in North America to collect evidence-based data to guide future treatment of this prevalent injury in the growing elderly population.

PI: Kevin Chung

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim

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