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Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2011-2016

The MROC Study seeks to evaluate and compare from the patient's point of view the leading options for breast reconstruction after mastectomy. This study will help patients, physicians, payers and policy makers better understand the various surgeries available for breast reconstruction. Although many women choose reconstruction, the number of options as well as their pros and cons can make decision making difficult and stressful. From this research, we hope to learn more about what works best for patients undergoing these operations.

PI: Edwin Wilkins

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim

Funded by

Funding Years: 2016-2019

This project will examine behavioral economic strategies for decreasing the use of low-value clinical services as listed in the Choose Wisely campaign. The proposed intervention, Committing to Choose Wisely (CCW), will ask clinicians to commit to avoid low-value services and provide resources to support adherence to this commitment. The intervention, which extends across two large health systems, will generate quantitative data from clinical automated data and focused medical record review data to examine rates of order before and after the intervention, as well as qualitative data from surveys and semi-structured interviews of both clinicians and patients to determine the effects of the intervention on their decision-making and experiences.

PI(s): Jeffrey Kullgren

Co-I(s): Eve Kerr

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2015-2016

POINT is a randomized, double-blind, multicenter clinical trial to determine whether clopidogrel 75mg/day (after a loading dose of 600mg) is effective in improving survival free from major ischemic vascular events (ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, and ischemic vascular death) at 90 days when initiated within 12 hours time last known free of new ischemic symptoms of TIA or minor ischemic stroke in subjects receiving aspirin 50-325mg/day.

PI(s): Claiborne Johnston

Co-I(s):  J. Donald Easton, Mary Farrant, William Barsan, Holly Battenhouse, Robin Conwit, Catherine Dillon, Jordan Elm, Anne Lindblad, Lewis Morgenstern, Sharon Poisson, Yuko Palesch

Funded by: Oregon Health & Science University, and Agency for Health Care Quality & Research

Funding Years: 2015-2017

The purpose of this study is to evaluate approximately eight grants that will test interventions to improve cardiovascular disease prevention. The investigators will collect and analyze qualitative data to identify the most effective combinations of intervention strategies. The investigators will observe grantees and selected practices to understand why and how those combinations are effective. The investigators will also gather data from the grantees to assess how effective the interventions are.

PI: Michael Fetters, MD. MPH. MA.

Cited in C.S. Mott’s Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Physician’s Brief, recent research led by CBSSM’s Naomi Laventhal and Stephanie Kukora examines the role and accuracy of antenatal counseling in supporting shared decision making for complicated pregnancies, particularly those with a poor prognosis.

Other articles by Naomi Laventhal in the Journal of Pediatrics, the Journal of Perinatology, and Pediatric Cardiology are also cited.

Click here for more details.

Thu, October 26, 2017

In a new analysis in Health Affairs, CBSSM's Jeffrey Kullgren and fellow researchers found that while the "Choosing Wisely" campaign to reduce overtesting and overtreatment is off to a strong start, more work is still needed to cut back on low-value care.

Tue, January 16, 2018

CBSSM Director, Reshma Jagsi was recently interviewed for the LA Times article, "Will medicine be the next field to face a sexual harassment reckoning?" This article discusses her 2014 survey on sexual harassment and gender bias in academic medicine, as well as her recent article on the #MeToo movement as it relates to medicine in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Salomeh Michelle Salari, MS

Fellow

Sally is a fourth year medical student at the University of Michigan with the intent of specializing in Obstetrics and Gynecology. She is a member of the "Pathway of Excellence" ethics co-curricular program and is the CBSSM's second pre-doctoral clinical ethics fellow. Her interests include preventative ethics and moral distress, for which she is piloting "Moral Distress (MoD) Rounds" on non-intensive patient units at Mott Hospital.

Last Name: 
Salari

Wendy Uhlmann, MS, CGC

Faculty

Wendy R. Uhlmann, MS, CGC is the genetic counselor/clinic coordinator of the Medical Genetics Clinic at the University of Michigan. She is a Clinical Professor in the Departments of Internal Medicine and Human Genetics and an executive faculty member of the genetic counseling training program. Wendy Uhlmann is a Past President of the National Society of Genetic Counselors and previously served on the Board of Directors of the Genetic Alliance and as NSGC’s liaison to the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research.

Last Name: 
Uhlmann

Michael Fetters, MD, MPH, MA

Faculty

I serve as Professor of Family Medicine, Director of Japanese Family Health Program, and Co-Director of the Michigan Mixed Methods Research and Scholarship Program at the University of Michigan. In addition to being a family/general doctor fluent in Japanese, I have long been interested in the influence of culture on medical decision making and ethics, and have conducted numerous health research projects, and published numerous papers in English and Japanese.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Fetters

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