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Jacquelyn Miller, MA

Research Associate

Jackie re-joined CBSSM in spring of 2017. She currently works with Drs. Lesly Dossett and Tom Valley on projects related to the worries and concerns of those with loved ones in the ICU, feedback and disclosure of errors that have occurred in other hospital systems, and opioid prescribing after cancer surgery. She has a BS in Environmental Policy and Developing Country Studies (University of Michigan, School of Natural Resources and Environment) and a MA in Sociology, specializing in environmental justice, feminist sociology, and science and technology studies (Michigan State University).

Last Name: 
Miller

Submit Your Paper for Consideration in the ASBH Student Paper Competition

If you are a student who would like to be considered for the Student Paper Award, please send your paper to the ASBH office in an electronic format (Word or PDF) to candersen@asbh.org, with “ASBH Student Paper Competition” in the subject line.  All papers need to be received at the ASBH office by July 15, 2013 to be considered.    The Awards Committee will review and rank all submissions.  The top three papers will be placed in a special session at the Annual Meeting, and one winner will be chosen at the meeting by the Awards Committee. The award will be presented during the Members’ meeting.

All papers will be assessed anonymously.  Do not include identifying information in your paper submissions, such as title pages with your name. Previous winners are not eligible for consideration. Eligible papers should be no more than 3500 words in length. A student is defined as one who is actively pursuing an advanced degree and has not received a doctoral-level degree (e.g., MD, PhD, JD or equivalent degree). Authors who are not students according to the definition above are not eligible for the Student Paper Award. Coauthored papers are eligible only if all authors are students.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the ASBH office at: info@asbh.org

Thank you,
 
American Society for Bioethics + Humanities (ASBH)
Phone: 847-375-4745

www.asbh.org

 

Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2014 - 2019.

The Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) Project is an ongoing stroke surveillance study that began in 1999. BASIC is the only ongoing stroke surveillance project focusing on Mexican Americans. Mexican Americans are the largest segment of the Hispanic American population, the United States' largest minority group. Since the inception of this project, we have assembled a cohort of over 4,992 cerebrovascular disease patients whom we are able to follow for recurrent cerebrovascular events as well as mortality. This gives us tremendous power to detect associations with biological and social risk factors for stroke, important to Mexican Americans as well as the broader United States population. We have demonstrated increased stroke incidence and recurrence in Mexican Americans. Stroke severity and ischemic stroke subtypes are similar between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Mortality following stroke appears to be less in Mexican Americans. In the next five years we are positioned to delineate trends in stroke rates, and to explore the potential reasons for the increased stroke burden in Mexican Americans, as well as their improved survival. This information will be critically important to all populations to reduce the devastation of stroke. We will continue to make important observations useful for planning delivery of stroke care in communities. For the first time we will investigate functional and cognitive outcome following stroke in Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites.

PI(s): Lynda Lisabeth, Lewis Morgenstern

Co-I(s): Brisa Sanchez

Funded by American Medical Sleep Foundation

Funding Years: 2015-2018

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a well-recognized risk factor for serious health consequences and increased health care expenditures, but the impact of OSA under-recognition and under-treatment on outcomes and healthcare utilization patterns on a national level remains largely unstudied, particularly among the elderly. Research that characterizes the scope and impact of OSA under-recognition across the U.S. - and barriers to its diagnosis and treatment - is needed to develop strategies that will optimize medical outcomes for Americans with OSA. This proposal aims to identify critical gaps in the identification and treatment of OSA in the U.S., and determine the extent to which such gaps influence outcomes and healthcare utilization. This study will be facilitated though analysis of Medicare 5% datasets, and the National Health and Aging Trends Study - a newly available survey of Medicare beneficiaries that focuses on health outcomes in adults age 65 and older, linked to Medicare claims data. This approach will allow us to characterize national trends in OSA recognition and treatment, clarify relationships between OSA and health outcomes; and identify barriers to improving OSA-related consequences. Ultimately, this project will inform future research directed at improving cost-effective strategies to ameliorate medical and economic consequences of OSA.

PI(s): Tiffany Braley, James Burke

Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2011-2017)

In the United States, over 300,000 individuals over age 65 suffer from distal radius fractures (DRFs) each year. Despite the frequency of this injury and over 200 years of experience treating DRFs, management of elderly DRFs is still controversial. Close reduction and casting is a nonsurgical technique that is frequently used, but osteoporotic fractures, common in the elderly, often collapse and displace. The three currently applied surgical techniques are close reduction and percutaneous pinning, external fixation with or without percutaneous pinning, and internal fixation with volar locking plating. Preliminary evidence indicates that locking plate fixation can permit elderly patients to move their hands and wrists much sooner in order to return to self-care activities more quickly. Although these outcomes are promising, there is no randomized controlled clinical trial to demonstrate that the more invasive, and perhaps more costly, plating technique is superior to the other simpler approaches. The aim of this randomized controlled trial is to compare outcomes of these three surgical techniques in treating unstable DRFs in the elderly. The secondary aim is to follow a cohort of elderly patients who choose not to have surgery to evaluate outcomes following treatment by close reduction and casting alone. This clinical trial is the most ambitious study in hand surgery by assembling most of the leading centers in North America to collect evidence-based data to guide future treatment of this prevalent injury in the growing elderly population.

PI: Kevin Chung

Co-I(s): H. Myra Kim

Funded by NIH - Department of Health and Human Services

Funding Years: 2014-2016

This proposal's main objective is the development of a novel Perfusion Monitoring Device (PMD) based upon diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), which will enable microsurgeons to assess the level of vascularization of buried (prelaminated) flaps and the successful perfusion of transplanted microvascular grafts. The PMD will shift current assessment of buried flap vascularization from subjective to direct quantitative determination. Currently there is no widely accepted clinical method of measuring buried flap vascularization or successful transplanted microvascular graft perfusion. The PMD would fill this need. The PMD leverages the recent availability of compact low-cost light sources, solid state detectors, and CPUs to simplify and miniaturize the measurement of buried flap vascularization and successful transplanted microvascular graft perfusion. The development of this technology is critical both for accident victims and for wounded soldiers, who have returned home with complex maxillofacial injuries. These injuries result in devastating soft tissue defects, i.e. avulsion of the lips that require innovative surgical approaches that include the use of tissue engineering in combination with microvascular surgery to develop unique prevascularized prelaminated flaps that are critical in the reconstruction of complex human anatomy such as the lips. Since these unique prelaminated flaps are buried under the skin we need novel PMDs to monitor their vascularization so that they can be harvested for transplantation at the most optimal moment. We will use both phantoms and an animal model in this Phase I proposal for the development of the PMD using DCS.

PI(s): Stephen Feinberg, Sean Edwards

Co-I(s): Brent Ward, H. Myra Kim, Joseph Helman, Mary-Ann Mycek

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2011-2016

Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability in the US and a leading cause of death. Mexican Americans (MA), the largest subgroup of Hispanic Americans, have a substantially higher stroke risk than European Americans, especially at younger ages where the risk is more than double. Given the greater risk and earlier onset, the impact of stroke is disproportionately experienced by MAs. Reasons for increased stroke risk in MAs are poorly understood. More than half of ischemic stroke patients have sleep apnea, a very common and important risk factor for stroke and potentially a risk factor for poor stroke outcome. No published studies have established the prevalence of sleep apnea in MAs to discern sleep apnea's contribution to excess stroke burden in this population. Small studies conducted in academic medical centers have suggested that stroke patients with sleep apnea have particularly poor stroke outcomes, but population-based studies in diverse populations are lacking. The current application seeks to investigate health disparities related to sleep apnea in stroke patients in order to understand the marked ethnic differences in stroke. This research will inform the development of interventions to prevent or treat sleep apnea in MAs, which will reduce the ethnic stroke disparity.

PI(s): Devin Brown, Lynda Lisabeth

Co-I(s): Ronald Chervin, Lewis Morgenstern, Brisa Sanchez

Jeremy Sussman, MD, MS

Faculty

Dr. Sussman is a Research Scientist in the Center for Clinical Management Research at the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Health System and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School. He attended medical school at the University of California, San Francisco, completed internal medicine residency at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar at the University of Michigan.

Last Name: 
Sussman

ELSI-LHS Symposium

Wed, November 15, 2017, 8:00am to 4:00pm
Location: 
Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave

Join us for our 2nd annual symposium and workshop on the ethical, legal and social implications of learning health systems (ELSI-LHS).


This year's focus will be on data and knowledge sharing.


NOV 15 - 8:00 am - 4:00 pm: The symposium will lay out the ELSI of data sharing and translation in learning health systems that strive to be both FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) and fair. The day will interactively address critical issues on data and knowledge sharing.


Speakers include John Wilbanks, Elizabeth Pike, Kenneth Goodman, Debra Mathews, Peter Embi, Peter Singleton, Warren Kibbe, Joon-Ho Yu and more to come!


Proceeds will be synthesized into draft recommendations for data and translation to practice & streamline future ELSI-LHS research.


We have issued a Call for Poster Abstracts to be included in the 2nd annual symposium. Poster displays should relate to the conference theme, "Data and Knowledge Sharing," and may relate to either ELSI or technical aspects of learning health systems. Abstracts and posters should be developed for an interdisciplinary audience including social scientists, informaticians, health care providers, and community members.


To submit an abstract, please go to: 2017 ELSI Abstract Submission
#elsilhs

CBSSM is a co-sponsor of this event.

Timothy R. B. Johnson, MD

Faculty

Timothy R. B. Johnson, M.D. served as Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Michigan from 1993-2017.  He is Bates Professor of the Diseases of Women and Children; and also Arthur F. Thurnau Professor; Professor, Women’s Studies, and Research Professor, Center for Human Growth and Development.  His education and training have been at the University of Michigan, University of Virginia and Johns Hopkins.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Johnson

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