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In videos for The Trust Project, bioethicist and sociologist Raymond De Vries explores trust in medicine from a sociological perspective.

In How Trust Shapes the Medical Field: A Sociologist's Perspective, De Vries offers a historical perspective on trust in medicine:

  • What role did industrialization play in changing interpersonal trust?
  • What can we learn about trusting relationships from past societies?

In The Rise of Bioethics in Response to Medical Distrust: Key Findings, De Vries discusses some key research in the field of trust and bioethics:

  • How did the erosion of trust in medicine lead to the rise in the study of bioethics?
  • Does the bureaucracy that comes with research ethics committees enhance or undermine trust?

An another video, Evolution of Trust in Bioethics medical research ethics.

The Trust Project at Northwestern University features scholars and executives exploring Trust in videos that cover theory, research and practice. By combining multiple and diverse perspectives, The Trust Project aspires to illuminate new insights for research and management.

Bioethics Grand Rounds: “Examining the Ethics of Victors Care”

Wed, February 28, 2018, 12:00pm
Location: 
Univerisity Hospital Ford Auditorium

Michigan Medicine has launched Victors Care, a concierge medical care model designed to deliver increased access, convenience and individually-tailored support within a primary care practice for patients who pay for membership. Like all concierge care programs, Victors Care raises ethical issues relating to justice, fairness, access, and consistency with the mission of Michigan Medicine. This Bioethics Grand Rounds will address the ethical issues of concierge care in a panel format with institutional leaders. The panel will address your questions directly. Questions will be solicited during the session, and can be submitted in advance via: https://umichumhs.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_b4nJWM70ahHQtjD.

Panelists
Marschall S. Runge, M.D., Ph.D., EVPMA and Dean
Reshma Jagsi, M.D., D.Phil, Director, Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine
David J. Brown, M.D., Associate Vice President and Associate Dean for Health Equity and Inclusion

Facilitators
Andrew Shuman, M.D., F.A.C.S & Christian J. Vercler, M.D, M.A, F.A.C.S – Service Chiefs, Clinical Ethics Service, Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine

Funded by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality

Funding Years: 2010-2011

This study will evaluate a broad-based collaboration between the largest insurer in Michigan (BCBSM) and physician organizations throughout the state to implement components of the Patient-Centered Medical Home, and will provide valuable lessons for PCMH initiatives throughout the country. Because of the wide range of independent practices of varying structure, demographics, and geographic locations participating in this collaboration, the lessons learned from this study will provide greater external validity for the vast majority of primary care practices than do the experiences of large, integrated health systems with employed physician staff and centralized administrative control. Results from this study could also help primary care teams prepare for their journey toward a fully- functioning PCMH by preparing them in advance for challenges that may arise during PCMH implementation, and having information on how others have overcome those challenges.

UM Affiliated Investigators: Michael Fetters (PI), Lee Green (Co-I), Jeffrey Alexander (Co-I).

More details can be found at NIH Reporter.

Tanner Caverly, MD, MPH

Faculty

Tanner Caverly has been a general internist and Health Services Research Fellow at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center and a Clinical Lecturer at the University of Michigan Medical School since July 2013. He graduated from medical school at The Ohio State University School of Medicine and Public Health, and subsequently traveled to the University of Colorado, where he completed internal medicine residency training, a year as Chief Medical Resident, and a Primary Care Research Fellowship / Masters in Public Health.

Last Name: 
Caverly

Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Learning Health Systems Symposium

Fri, November 18, 2016, 8:30am to 3:30pm
Location: 
Taubman Biomedical Science Research Building (BSRB) 109 Zina Pitcher Place

This symposium will promote dialogue and contribute to a research agenda on how learning health system organizers should engage the ethical, legal and social implications of this work.

The next generation of health information technology organizes data into large, networked systems to address challenges of U.S. health systems: spiraling costs, poor health outcomes, safety issues, unproductive research enterprises, and failure to implement known clinical best practices. More than simply “Big Data,” these systems are arranged as “learning health systems,” multi-stakeholder federations that gather and analyze data to create useful knowledge that is disseminated to all stakeholders. Harnessing the power of health data for learning strains ethical, legal, and social paradigms for how health information should be collected, stored, accessed, used, and destroyed.

CBSSM is a co-sponsor, along with the Brehm Center, the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR), the School of Public Health, and Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS).

EVENT REGISTRATION

Jacquelyn Miller, MA

Research Associate

Jackie re-joined CBSSM in spring of 2017. She currently works with Drs. Lesly Dossett and Tom Valley on projects related to the worries and concerns of those with loved ones in the ICU, feedback and disclosure of errors that have occurred in other hospital systems, and opioid prescribing after cancer surgery. She has a BS in Environmental Policy and Developing Country Studies (University of Michigan, School of Natural Resources and Environment) and a MA in Sociology, specializing in environmental justice, feminist sociology, and science and technology studies (Michigan State University).

Last Name: 
Miller

Chithra Perumalswami, MD, MSc

Fellow

Chithra Perumalswami is a general internist and palliative care specialist.  After training at the University of Michigan for undergraduate (English and Cellular and Molecular Biology) and graduate school (medical school & residency), she worked at Northwestern University as a clinician educator in hospital medicine.  During that time, she trained in hospice and palliative medicine and also worked on several local and statewide quality improvement initiatives.  She subsequently returned to the University of Michigan where she recently completed a Robert Wood Johnson/US Department of Vet

Last Name: 
Perumalswami

Funded by Harvard & NIH

Funding Years: 2015-2016

This study will use CBPR mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative data collection) to conduct needs assessments and design and evaluate a core family-based intervention. Project activities will emphasize capacity building in two refugee communities resettled in Greater Boston—the Somali Bantu and the Bhutanese—actively engaging refugee community members, community advisory boards, services providers, and other stakeholders. Specific Aims are to: (1) deepen partnerships with the Somali Bantu and Bhutanese communities through co-leadership, capacity-building, and knowledge sharing; (2) collect and apply qualitative data to (a) prepare a needs assessment of mental health in children and adolescents, barriers to care, and services preferences with each target refugee group; (b) develop mental health/psychosocial assessments for refugee caregivers and children; (c) adapt the core components of a family-based strengthening intervention for use with refugees; and (3) conduct an 80-family pilot study to examine acceptability and sustainability of the intervention. Key outcomes will be reduced mental health symptoms among children and adolescents and improvement in caregiver-child relationships

 

PI: Michael Fetters, MD, MPH, MA

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2011-2016

The CCC creates the NETT Network infrastructure to promote and conduct clinical trials that will provide new and effective treatments for neurologic emergencies by: Developing the Network architecture and organizational structure including bylaws and procedures; Establishing processes to design and implement trials that will encourage the clinical translation of findings into routine practice; Managing clinical trials (establish rigorous criteria for monitoring recruitment, adhere to established deadlines and develop criteria for monitoring Hub effectiveness and compliance); Providing clinical trial operational resources (electronic data entry, automated screening and notification, access to telemedicine resources, advanced outcomes assessment, and human subjects protection tools); Creating an information technology infrastructure that will enhance the efficiency, speed, and accuracy of site, trial, and data management in the Network; Establishing trial development structures (recruit future trials and investigators, define internal review and publication procedures).

PI(s): Bill Barsan

Co-I(s): Lewis Morgenstern, Art Pancioli, Robert Silbergleit

Target specific oral anticoagulants (TSOAC)s including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban represent novel alternatives to vitamin K antagonists. These medications provide an attractive choice for both physicians and patients alike due to their predictable pharmacokinetics, fixed-dose regimens, lack of routine monitoring, and fewer drug-drug interactions as compared to warfarin. However, these anticoagulants are not without their own unique features and risks, including required dose adjustments for patient specific factors such as renal function, weight, and age, and lack of a routine monitoring parameter to follow patient adherence with therapy. In addition, the cost of TSOACs and the growing number of indications they are currently approved for makes ensuring affordability as well as the correct dosage based on indication for therapy extremely important.

PI(s): Geoffrey Barnes

Co-I(s): Emily Ashjian

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