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Aaron Scherer, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Aaron Scherer was a CBSSM Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2014-2016. Aaron earned his PhD in Psychology from the University of Iowa and utilizes methodologies from social psychology, social cognition, and neuropsychology to study the causes and consequencdees of biased beliefs. His current research has focused on the causes and consequences of biased beliefs regarding health and politics.

Last Name: 
Scherer

Jennifer Skillicorn, DrPH, MPH

Research Associate

Jennifer joined CBSSM in August 2017. She works with Dr. Susan Goold and community partners on grant funded research projects related to evaluating Medicaid expansion and its impact on beneficiaries through the Healthy Michigan Plan and ways in which to engage minority and underserved communities in setting priorities for community health.

Last Name: 
Skillicorn

Janice Firn, PhD, MSW

Faculty

Dr. Firn has a BS from Michigan State University, MSW from the University of Michigan, and PhD from Lancaster University (UK). Before CBSSM, Janice worked in oncology and palliative care at Michigan Medicine. In her role as Clinical Ethicist for the Clinical Ethics Service, Janice responds to ethics consultation requests, and participates in preventative ethics rounds and education and research initiatives.  Her academic interests include bioethics; self-care, burnout, and resilience; palliative and end of life care; and interprofessional education and collaboration.

Last Name: 
Firn

Joseph Colbert, BA

Research Associate

Joseph joined CBSSM as a Research Area Specialist in November 2017. As a project manager, he coordinates the daily operations of Dr. Jeffrey Kullgren’s project “Provider, Patient, and Health System Effects of Provider Commitments to Choose Wisely,” a grant funded research project using novel approaches to reduce the overuse of low-value services in healthcare.

Last Name: 
Colbert
Fri, February 21, 2014

Dr. Reshma Jagsi was involved with a study that reported an increase in women who recieved breast reconstruction following a masectomy for breast cancer. The study found that, "46 percent of patients received reconstruction in 1998 but that figure rose to 63 percent by 2007." Jagsi said, "Breast reconstruction has a big impact on quality of life for breast cancer survivors. As we are seeing more women survive breast cancer, we need to focus on long term survivorship issues and ensuring that women have access to this important part of treatment."

Thu, August 14, 2014

Tarini and her colleagues studied parent attitudes about using newborn screening samples for research. The research, published in 2009, found that if permission is obtained, 76.2% of parents were ‘very or somewhat willing’ to permit use of the newborn screening sample for research. If permission is not obtained, only 28.2% of parents were ‘very or somewhat willing.’

The CBS story was about a new law that allows Minnesota health officials to indefinitely hold blood samples from newborn babies without parental consent.

Research Topics: 
Mon, January 05, 2015

Reshma Jagsi was interviewed by mCancerTalk for the article, “Is your course of radiation treatment longer than it needs to be?” which focuses on two of her radiation treatment studies. In one of her studies, looking at a national database of patients, she and her colleagues found that hypofractionated radiation therapy was used in only 13.6% of Medicare patients with breast cancer. In Michigan, Jagsi’s other study found, fewer than one-third of patients who fit the criteria for offering this approach got the shorter course of treatment.

Read Dr. Jagsi’s paper about hypofractionation use nationally and in Michigan.

Fri, April 10, 2015

Dr. Jagsi was interviewed by MedicalResearch.com, discussing her study which finds many breast cancer patients have an unmet need to discuss genetic testing with their healthcare provider. The study found that 35 percent of women with breast cancer expressed a strong desire for genetic testing, but 43 percent of those women did not have a relevant discussion with a healthcare professional. "By more routinely addressing genetic risk with patients, we can better inform them of their true risk of cancer returning or of developing a new cancer," Dr. Jagsi explains in the interview. "This could potentially alleviate worry and reduce confusion about cancer risk."

"Still Alice" Film Screening & Moderated Discussion

Thu, October 15, 2015, 7:00pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Forum Hall, Palmer Commons

"Still Alice" Film Screening & Moderated Discussion

Free Admission

Moderator:    Raymond De Vries, PhD

Panelists:     Nancy Barbas, MD
                  J. Scott Roberts, PhD

Refreshments provided.

Based on Lisa Genova’s bestselling novel. In an Oscar winning performance, Julianne Moore plays Alice Howland, a renowned neurolinguistics professor at Columbia University who is diagnosed with familial, early onset Alzheimer’s Disease. The film provides insight into the patient’s perspective and the challenges patients, families, and caregivers face. The film also raises important bioethical questions related to patient autonomy, genetic testing, and personhood in the face of dementia.

Geoffrey Barnes is lead author on study published in the American Journal of Medicine finding new anticoagulants are driving increase in atrial fibrillation treatment and reducing warfarin therapy use.

“The data provides a promising outlook about atrial fibrillation which is known for being undertreated,” says lead author Geoffrey Barnes, M.D., MSc.,  cardiologist at the University of Michigan Health System and researcher at the Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.  “When we don’t treat atrial fibrillation, patients are at risk for stroke. By seeking treatment, patients set themselves up for better outcomes.”

More details can be found here.

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