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Tue, January 16, 2018

CBSSM Director, Reshma Jagsi was recently interviewed for the LA Times article, "Will medicine be the next field to face a sexual harassment reckoning?" This article discusses her 2014 survey on sexual harassment and gender bias in academic medicine, as well as her recent article on the #MeToo movement as it relates to medicine in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Salomeh Michelle Salari, MS

Fellow

Sally is a fourth year medical student at the University of Michigan with the intent of specializing in Obstetrics and Gynecology. She is a member of the "Pathway of Excellence" ethics co-curricular program and is the CBSSM's second pre-doctoral clinical ethics fellow. Her interests include preventative ethics and moral distress, for which she is piloting "Moral Distress (MoD) Rounds" on non-intensive patient units at Mott Hospital.

Last Name: 
Salari

Funded by: Oregon Health & Science University, and Agency for Health Care Quality & Research

Funding Years: 2015-2017

The purpose of this study is to evaluate approximately eight grants that will test interventions to improve cardiovascular disease prevention. The investigators will collect and analyze qualitative data to identify the most effective combinations of intervention strategies. The investigators will observe grantees and selected practices to understand why and how those combinations are effective. The investigators will also gather data from the grantees to assess how effective the interventions are.

PI: Michael Fetters, MD, MPH, MA

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding years: 2009-2014

The proposed project aims to explore and examine the experiences and preferences regarding communication about positive newborn screening results of key stakeholders (parents, primary care physicians, clinical geneticists, and state newborn screening officials) involved in the three key stages: notification about the initial positive screen; follow-up testing and evaluation; and parental notification of the final results of the evaluation. For more information, visit NIH Reporter.

PI: Beth Tarini

Funded by

Funding Years: 2016-2019

This project will examine behavioral economic strategies for decreasing the use of low-value clinical services as listed in the Choose Wisely campaign. The proposed intervention, Committing to Choose Wisely (CCW), will ask clinicians to commit to avoid low-value services and provide resources to support adherence to this commitment. The intervention, which extends across two large health systems, will generate quantitative data from clinical automated data and focused medical record review data to examine rates of order before and after the intervention, as well as qualitative data from surveys and semi-structured interviews of both clinicians and patients to determine the effects of the intervention on their decision-making and experiences.

PI(s): Jeffrey Kullgren

Co-I(s): Eve Kerr

Wendy Uhlmann, MS, CGC

Faculty

Wendy R. Uhlmann, MS, CGC is the genetic counselor/clinic coordinator of the Medical Genetics Clinic at the University of Michigan. She is a Clinical Professor in the Departments of Internal Medicine and Human Genetics and an executive faculty member of the genetic counseling training program. Wendy Uhlmann is a Past President of the National Society of Genetic Counselors and previously served on the Board of Directors of the Genetic Alliance and as NSGC’s liaison to the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research.

Last Name: 
Uhlmann

Michael Fetters, MD, MPH, MA

2014 Bishop Lecture featuring Myra Christopher

Thu, May 15, 2014 (All day)
Location: 
Vandenberg Meeting Hall (2nd floor), The Michigan Hall, 911 N. University, Ann Arbor, MI.

The CBSSM Research Colloquium featured the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as the keynote address.  Myra Christopher presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: "The Moral Imperative to Transform the Way Pain is Perceived, Judged and Treated".

Myra Christopher holds the Kathleen M. Foley Chair in Pain and Palliative Care at the Center for Practical Bioethics.  Prior to December 2011, Ms. 

Christopher was President and CEO of the Center for Practical Bioethics since its inception in 1984 through December 2011.  From 1998-2003, Christopher also served as the national program officer of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s National Program Office for State-based Initiatives to Improve End-of Life Care which was housed at the Center.  These roles have allowed Christopher to continue her lifelong mission to improve care for those who are seriously ill and their families.

Since the late 1990s, Christopher has expanded the scope of her work to include the under treatment of chronic pain.  She is currently the Director of the Pain Action Initiative: A National Strategy (PAINS) and serves as Chair of the PAINS Steering Committee. From 2010-2011 she served as a member of Pain Study Committee at the Institute of Medicine focused on the under-treatment of pain.  In 2012 she was appointed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sibelius, to the Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee (IPRCC) at the National Institutes of Health. In that capacity, she also serves on the Oversight Committee for the National Pain Strategy Task Force. 

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) Research Colloquium was held Thursday, May 15, 2014 at the Vandenberg Meeting Hall (2nd floor), The Michigan League, 911 N. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

Fri, October 04, 2013

The US News & World Report quoted Sarah Hawley and cited her research in a story about the tendency of young women with breast cancer to overestimate their risk of getting cancer in the opposite, healthy breast. 

An excerpt from the article, "Unfounded Fear Prompts Some Preventive Mastectomies: Study":

The findings echo some previous research, according to Sarah Hawley, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan Health System, in Ann Arbor. In her study, presented last year at a medical meeting, Hawley found that nearly 70 percent of women choosing the contralateral prophylactic mastectomy actually had a low risk of developing cancer in the healthy breast.

"Their findings are consistent with ours, in that desire to prevent cancer in the non-affected breast is a big reason patients reported for getting [contralateral prophylactic mastectomy]," Hawley said.

Better communication is needed to be sure women know the risks and benefits, and lack of benefit of getting the preventive surgery, Hawley pointed out. Better strategies to help patients manage anxiety and worry would help, too, she added.

 

Research Topics: 
Thu, December 08, 2016

Reshma Jagsi, MD, discusses the risk of complications on patients receiving radiation therapy if they've had implant reconstruction. Radiation therapy may affect outcomes of breast construction, and more is needed to help patients make informed choices.

San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) Presentation Title: Impact of radiotherapy on complications and patient-reported satisfaction with breast reconstruction: Findings from the prospective multicenter MROC study

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