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Wed, October 31, 2012

Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, recently had an article published in JAMA entitled “Gender Differences in the Salaries of Physician Researchers.” The results of the RWJ-funded study showed that male physician researchers earned $12,001 more than their female colleagues, after adjusting for a variety of factors that might impact salary. This disparity can add up to $350,000 over the course of a medical career.
Dr. Jagsi was interviewed by the Associated Press, and the article received considerable press coverage in multiple sources including the New York TimesForbes, MSNBC, and the Wall Street Journal. Click here for more information.

Wed, April 24, 2013

Angela Fagerlin is cited in a recent Reuters Health article: “Discuss cancer-reducing drugs with women – panel."

"For a woman who starts out with a one in 40 chance of developing cancer, she told Reuters Health, "Your risk goes from 2.5 to 1.25 (percent). It's a 1 percent difference in your risk of breast cancer, having to take a drug every day for five years that has some side effects."

But for some women who have a much higher short-term risk of breast cancer - as high as 16 percent - the drugs are more likely to be worth potential side effects, said Fagerlin, who wasn't involved in the new review or the Task Force decision.

Research Topics: 
Fri, February 21, 2014

Dr. Reshma Jagsi was involved with a study that reported an increase in women who recieved breast reconstruction following a masectomy for breast cancer. The study found that, "46 percent of patients received reconstruction in 1998 but that figure rose to 63 percent by 2007." Jagsi said, "Breast reconstruction has a big impact on quality of life for breast cancer survivors. As we are seeing more women survive breast cancer, we need to focus on long term survivorship issues and ensuring that women have access to this important part of treatment."

Mon, January 05, 2015

Reshma Jagsi was interviewed by mCancerTalk for the article, “Is your course of radiation treatment longer than it needs to be?” which focuses on two of her radiation treatment studies. In one of her studies, looking at a national database of patients, she and her colleagues found that hypofractionated radiation therapy was used in only 13.6% of Medicare patients with breast cancer. In Michigan, Jagsi’s other study found, fewer than one-third of patients who fit the criteria for offering this approach got the shorter course of treatment.

Read Dr. Jagsi’s paper about hypofractionation use nationally and in Michigan.

Fri, April 10, 2015

Dr. Jagsi was interviewed by MedicalResearch.com, discussing her study which finds many breast cancer patients have an unmet need to discuss genetic testing with their healthcare provider. The study found that 35 percent of women with breast cancer expressed a strong desire for genetic testing, but 43 percent of those women did not have a relevant discussion with a healthcare professional. "By more routinely addressing genetic risk with patients, we can better inform them of their true risk of cancer returning or of developing a new cancer," Dr. Jagsi explains in the interview. "This could potentially alleviate worry and reduce confusion about cancer risk."

Fri, May 08, 2015

The vaccine appears to slow spread in those with advanced breast cancer. Sarah Hawley was quoted, "The preliminary finding that the vaccine improved progression-free survival in patients with metastatic cancer [when the disease has spread to other parts of the body] is especially exciting because of the lack of good treatments for metastatic breast cancer... If the authors can replicate this result in future trials in metastatic and non-metastatic or newly diagnosed patients, this will represent an important direction for the field of breast cancer treatment research."

Thu, March 03, 2016

In an interview with MedicalResearch.com, Dr. Sarah Hawley discusses her new study regarding breast cancer patients' understanding of risk. She states, "Research has shown that breast cancer patients do not have a good understanding of their risk of distant recurrence, and and that the fear of cancer spreading is one of the biggest concerns that patients have. The research that has been done shows that most patients over-esimate this risk, and think they have a bigger chance of the cancer coming back than they actually have."

Wed, September 09, 2015

Raymond De Vries is quoted in a Dutch national newpaper, Volkskrant, regarding a recent AMC Netherlands and University of Amsterdam study comparing infant mortality in mid-wife led versus obstetrician-led care in the Netherlands. Dr. De Vries provides a positive review of the methodology and the colloborative nature of the study (which includes both midwives and obstetricians).

The Volkskrant article is in Dutch, but the study published in the journal "Midwifery" is in English.

Research Topics: 
Wed, May 18, 2016

Reshma Jagsi’s survey of high-achieving physician-scientists published in JAMA, found that nearly a third of women reported experiencing sexual harassment. As women now make up about half of medical school students, the researchers emphasize the importance of recognizing unconscious bias as well as overtly inappropriate behaviors.

1. Reshma Jagsi, Kent A. Griffith, Rochelle Jones, Chithra R. Perumalswami, Peter Ubel, Abigail Stewart. Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Experiences of Academic Medical Faculty. JAMA, 2016; 315 (19): 2120 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.2188

Research Topics: 
Fri, December 09, 2016

Kenneth Langa's national study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, was cited in a New York Times article discussing US dementia trends. Despite concern that dementia rates were increasing, Langa found that it is actually decreasing. He found that population brain health seemed to improve between 2000 and 2012 and that increasing educational attainment and better control of cardiovascular risk factors may have contributed to the improvement. However, the full set of social, behavioral, and medical factors contributing to the improvement is still uncertain.

Research Topics: 

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