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Wed, September 09, 2015

Raymond De Vries is quoted in a Dutch national newpaper, Volkskrant, regarding a recent AMC Netherlands and University of Amsterdam study comparing infant mortality in mid-wife led versus obstetrician-led care in the Netherlands. Dr. De Vries provides a positive review of the methodology and the colloborative nature of the study (which includes both midwives and obstetricians).

The Volkskrant article is in Dutch, but the study published in the journal "Midwifery" is in English.

Research Topics: 
Wed, May 18, 2016

Reshma Jagsi’s survey of high-achieving physician-scientists published in JAMA, found that nearly a third of women reported experiencing sexual harassment. As women now make up about half of medical school students, the researchers emphasize the importance of recognizing unconscious bias as well as overtly inappropriate behaviors.

1. Reshma Jagsi, Kent A. Griffith, Rochelle Jones, Chithra R. Perumalswami, Peter Ubel, Abigail Stewart. Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Experiences of Academic Medical Faculty. JAMA, 2016; 315 (19): 2120 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.2188

Research Topics: 
Fri, December 09, 2016

Kenneth Langa's national study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, was cited in a New York Times article discussing US dementia trends. Despite concern that dementia rates were increasing, Langa found that it is actually decreasing. He found that population brain health seemed to improve between 2000 and 2012 and that increasing educational attainment and better control of cardiovascular risk factors may have contributed to the improvement. However, the full set of social, behavioral, and medical factors contributing to the improvement is still uncertain.

Research Topics: 

Raymond De Vries is involved in a new research study led by Akbar Waljee, MD, MSc, which will develop a risk-based strategy to help providers tailor timing of treatments among CHC Veterans to ensure that those who most need urgent therapy get it as quickly as possible.

Using democratic deliberation, Dr. De Vries will engage Veterans to learn their thoughts and preferences about such a strategy, which will help with its implementation in a clinical setting.

Click here for more details.

Wed, February 01, 2017

Raymond De Vries' commentary, "Giving (Bits of) Your Self to Medicine" was recently published in Medicine at Michigan. He and his colleague, Tom Tomlinson (MSU), published national survey data in JAMA that showed that while most Americans are willing to donate to biobanks, they have serious concerns about how we ask for their consent and about how their donations may be used in future research.

Mon, July 31, 2017

Sarah Hawley and co-authors, David Miller and Megan Haymart, recently discussed their New England Journal of Medicine perspective piece, "Active Surveillance for Low-Risk Cancers — A Viable Solution to Overtreatment?" in an MHealth Lab interview. They discuss whether active surveillance — close monitoring without immediate treatment — could reduce overtreatment for some thyroid, prostate and breast cancer patients.

Fri, September 15, 2017

A study on surgeon influence on double mastectomy co-authored by Sarah Hawley and Reshma Jagsi was recently highlighted in Time Health.  This study found that attending surgeons exerted a substantial amount of influence on the likelihood of receipt of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy after a breast cancer diagnosis. Steven Katz was first author of this study.

Wed, October 11, 2017

In a study published in Cancer, Reshma Jagsi, Sarah Hawley and other researchers examined the impact double mastectomy on employment of breast cancer patients. They found that working patients who received more aggressive treatments were more likely to experience substantial employment disruptions.

Naomi Laventhal, MD, MA

Faculty

Dr. Naomi T. Laventhal joined the University of Michigan in August 2009, after completing her residency in pediatrics, fellowships in neonatology and clinical medical ethics, and a master’s degree in public policy at the University of Chicago. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases in the Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, and in the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM).

Last Name: 
Laventhal

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding years: 2009-2014

The proposed project aims to explore and examine the experiences and preferences regarding communication about positive newborn screening results of key stakeholders (parents, primary care physicians, clinical geneticists, and state newborn screening officials) involved in the three key stages: notification about the initial positive screen; follow-up testing and evaluation; and parental notification of the final results of the evaluation. For more information, visit NIH Reporter.

PI: Beth Tarini

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