Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query news events press coverage 2017 10 26.

Page not found

You are here

Timothy R. B. Johnson, MD

Faculty

Timothy R. B. Johnson, M.D. served as Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Michigan from 1993-2017.  He is Bates Professor of the Diseases of Women and Children; and also Arthur F. Thurnau Professor; Professor, Women’s Studies, and Research Professor, Center for Human Growth and Development.  His education and training have been at the University of Michigan, University of Virginia and Johns Hopkins.

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Johnson

I Saw It on a Billboard (Feb-10)

What is the impact of medical advertising that is directly targeted at patients? What information do consumers of medical products and therapies need in order to make informed decisions about their health?

Consider the following:

Ms. J, a healthy 50-year old woman, drives by a billboard that advertises low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning to screen for lung cancer. Although she has no family history of cancer and has never smoked, several of Ms. J’s friends have been diagnosed with cancer recently. She worries that she herself may have an undetected malignancy.

Responding to this advertising, Ms. J decides to pay out-of-pocket for a CT scan at the imaging center advertised on the billboard. The radiologist at this imaging center profits from the number of scans interpreted. As a result of the CT scan, an abnormality is found, and Ms. J undergoes a biopsy of her lung. A complication occurs from this procedure, but Ms. J recovers, and the biopsy comes back negative. She is relieved to learn that she does not have lung cancer.

After reading this scenario and thinking about direct-to consumer medical advertising, which of the following statements best represents your views?

  • STATEMENT A: Direct-to-consumer advertising improves patient education and patient-physician communication. Such advertising informs and empowers patients, so that their health care better reflects their needs and values. In particular, certain health services require complex medical equipment with high capital costs. Physicians who invest in such equipment do so because they believe in its promise, and they deserve payment to recoup their investment.
  • STATEMENT B: Direct-to-consumer advertising often results in misunderstanding, increased costs, and disruption of the patient-physician relationship. Such advertising can skew information to portray products in a positive light and can prey upon patients’ fears. Physicians closely allied with a treatment cannot offer objective assessment to patients about the efficacy or risks of the treatment. Further, most patients are ignorant of the financial incentives to physicians for various procedures.
  • STATEMENT C: I have not formed a viewpoint on direct-to-consumer medical advertising.

 

How do your answers compare? 

CBDSM's Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, has written a powerful challenge to the medical profession and medical industries in a recent issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Jagsi argues that the increasing proliferation of direct-to-patient advertising has raised questions of how physicians can function as unbiased intermediaries between patients and industry.

In the article, she presents six case studies, one of which has been excerpted and adapted for this Decision of the Month. Dr. Jagsi uses these case studies to address serious issues related to both advertising and conflict of interest. Some examples:

  • What implications does the frequently used advertising directive "Ask your doctor about X" have for the doctor-patient relationship?
  • How ethical is it to disguise medical advertising—for instance, to hire celebrities to discuss treatments during interviews?
  • Should a physician who prescribes a particular medical device be allowed to receive payment from the speakers' bureau of a company that produces that medical device?
  • Should a physician who holds an ownership interest in an expensive treatment machine be required to explain alternate treatments to patients?
  • When does a website about a medical treatment cross over from being informational to being promotional?

Dr. Jagsi argues that physicians have a strong ethical responsibility to their patients to call attention to potential conflicts of interest and to help interpret medical information in the best interests of their patients.

For more details about this study:

Jagsi R. Conflicts of interest and the physician-patient relationship in the era of direct-to-patient advertising. Journal of Clinical Oncology 2007;25:902-905.

 

Researchpalooza

Wed, August 27, 2014, 11:00am to 2:00pm
Location: 
Circle Drive in front of Med Sci I

 

This will be the first year that CBSSM will be participating in Researchpalooza. Please come and enjoy the fun!

 

Wednesday, August 27, 2014
11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Circle Drive in front of Med Sci I

 

All UMHS employees from the Hospitals and Health Centers and Medical School are invited to celebrate this annual event.

Stop by the University Hospital Courtyard and Medical School Circle Drive for:

  • Ice Cream sundaes and sugar-free alternatives
  • Karaoke and musical entertainment
  • Festival Games
  • Department and vendor tables with information and giveaways

 

For more info: http://medicine.umich.edu/medschool/research/office-research/research-news-events/researchpalooza

Bioethics Grand Rounds -Susan Goold, MD

Wed, July 26, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Auditorium

Susan Goold, MD, MHSA, MA, FACP Title: “Trust me, I’m an Accountable Care Organization”

Abstract: Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are a new form of health care organization in which a network of health care providers is given a financial incentive to reduce total costs of care while meeting certain quality benchmarks for a defined patient group. What are the moral responsibilities of such organizations, if any? How might ACOs and those who work in them care for patients in an accountable, trustworthy way?

 

Mon, October 30, 2017

In a recent US Department of Health and Human Services symposium, Andrew Shuman discussed patient data privacy.

Thu, February 26, 2015

Raymond De Vries, Co-Director of CBSSM,  Kerry Ryan, H. Myra Kim, and Scott Kim are co-authors on a recently published JAMA Research Letter entitled, “Moral Concerns and the Willingness to Donate to a Research Biobank.”  Tom Tomlinson, PhD from MSU is the first author.

Listen here to Dr. De Vries discussing the findings on Michigan Radio's Stateside program.
 

Research Topics: 
Wed, February 03, 2016

Beth Tarini, MD, MS and colleagues are back in the news regarding their 2013 article in Pediatrics entitled, “Blindness in Walnut Grove: How Did Mary Ingalls Lose Her Sight?” Their article was cited in CNNCBS NewsNew York TimesAnnarbor.com and many others. 

Citation: Allexan SS,  Byington CL, Finkelstein JI, Tarini  BA (2013 ). "Blindness in Walnut Grove: How Did Mary Ingalls Lose Her Sight?" Pediatrics; DOI: 10.1542/peds.2012-1438 [Epub ahead of print]

Research Topics: 
Mon, June 23, 2014

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was interviewed by Reuters Health for the article "Shared decision making still lacking for cancer screening." He discusses his research and trade-offs in cancer screenings. "What this study does is it shows that despite all of the initiatives and the discussion of shared decision making that has been going on, we don't seem to be moving the needle very much," he states. 

His interview also received press in the Chicago Tribune and New York Daily News.

Michael Volk, MSc, MD

Alumni

Michael Volk was an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the University of Michigan. His clinical practice focuses on the care of patients with liver disease, including those undergoing liver transplantation and those with hepatocellular carcinoma. His research interests focus on the ethics of resource allocation, patient and physician decision making, and chronic disease management. In particular, he has conducted a series of studies designed to improve the way decisions are made about using high risk liver transplant organs.

Last Name: 
Volk

Pages