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Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, is the senior author on a study led by Donna M. Zulman, MD, that reveals about a third of doctors and their patients with diabetes do not agree on which of the patient's health conditions is most important. In the study, 38% of physicians (compared to 18% of patients) ranked hypertension as the most important condition. Patients were more likely to prioritize symptoms such as pain and depression. Read the article, in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, here. Read a press release about the article here.

Fri, February 28, 2014

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was quoted in a Scientific American article about risk communication of certain chemicals in the lives of expectant parents. He explains, “Look at your life and the choices you make, and do things that can make you safer easily, but don't overreact to anything ... There are very, very few things out there that have such huge effects on our lives or our baby's lives that one teeny bit of exposure is going to make a difference.”

Dr. Jason Karlawish, Professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania, will discuss his forthcoming novel, "Open Wound: The Tragic Obsession of Dr. William Beaumont" on Thursday, October 20, 3-5 pm, at the Biomedical Research Science Building (BSRB), Room 1130.  "Open Wound" is a fictional account of true events along the early 19th century American frontier, tracing the relationship between Dr. William Beaumont and his illiterate French Canadian patient.  The young trapper sustains an injury that never heals, leaving a hole in his stomach that the curious doctor uses as a window both to understand the mysteries of digestion and to advance his career.  A reception will follow the talk, and books will be available for purchase on site from Nicola's Books.  The event is co-sponsored by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, the Center for the History of Medicine, and the University of Michigan Press.  Click here for more information about the book. 

Bioethics Grand Rounds -Anna Kirkland, JD, PhD

Wed, June 28, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Auditorium

Anna Kirkland, JD, PhD Title –  "The Vaccine Injury Compensation Court and Its Critics"

Presenter –  Anna Kirkland, JD, PhD, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Women's Studies and Political Science, University of Michigan

Abstract: The so-called vaccine court is a small special court in the United States Court of Federal Claims that handles controversial claims that a vaccine has harmed someone. The government steps in as the defendant and vaccine manufacturers are protected from liability. In this court, lawyers, activists, judges, doctors, and scientists come together, sometimes arguing bitterly, trying to figure out whether a vaccine really caused a person’s medical problem. Drawing on her recently published book, Vaccine Court: The Law and Politics of Injury (NYU Press, 2016), Prof. Anna Kirkland will discuss the ethical controversies surrounding the vaccine court, from the perspective of anti-vaccine movement activists as well as from the mainstream.

Andrew Barnosky received the Kaiser Permanente Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching. The Kaiser Award is the most prestigious teaching award given by the Medical School. Made possible by a grant from the Kaiser Foundation Hospitals, it consists of an honorarium of $1,000 and a certificate which is presented to each awardee at the Graduation Luncheon. Two awards are given each year – one for preclinical and one for clinical teaching. Congratulations!

You can read the press release here.

Dr. Lewis B. Morgenstern was one of the 21 Med School faculty/staff members who received honors through the Dean's Awards program. He received the Clinical and Health Services Research Award, which recognizes a faculty member or group of faculty members who are identified as having made outstanding contributions to the Medical School in clinical or health services research. You can read the press release here.

Tue, September 20, 2011

The CBS News website recently featured 10 tips to make better decisions about cancer care from U-M’s Angela Fagerlin, Ph.D., associate professor of internal medicine. Below is an excerpt from the article:

Cancer is scary, and doctors sometimes sound as if they’re speaking a foreign language when talking about the disease and its treatment. But “people are making life and death decisions that may affect their survival and they need to know what they’re getting themselves into,” says Fagerlin “Cancer treatments and tests can be serious. Patients need to know what kind of side effects they might experience as a result of the treatment they undergo.”

 

Tue, January 10, 2017

Geoffrey Barnes was featured in a recent MHealth Lab article, "Medication Adherence a Problem in Atrial Fibrillation Patients." Dr. Barnes is the lead author of JAMA Cardiology article, which reports that while anticoagulant therapy is important for stroke prevention in people with atrial fibrillation, many people don’t stick with it for various reasons (side effects, physician advice, etc.).

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