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CBSSM's Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, is the lead author on a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine showing that women are less likely than men to receive major funding for scientific research. The study also found that only a quarter of all researchers (men and women) who received major early-career awards received further federal funding within five years. Additional authors are Amy Motomura, Kent Griffith, and Soumya Rangarajan. Read a press release about the article here.

Bioethics Grand Rounds: Musical Event "When Death Comes Callin"

Wed, October 26, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

When Death Comes Callin': Songs and Reflections About Death

Charlotte DeVries, Jeanne Mackey, Merilynne Rush, and friends offer a program of songs and brief readings reflecting various perspectives on death - humorous, sad, thoughtful, and quirky.

Lunch is provided on a first-come, first-served basis.

Tue, April 08, 2014

Reshma Jagsi’s study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology about financial decline in breast cancer survivors has been cited by various health media outlets, including Bio-Medicine, Health News Digest, and various other outlets. The study found that after receiving treatment, a quarter of breast cancer survivors were found to be worse off financially. 

Jacob Seagull, Ph.D., assistant professor of medical education, was part of a team recognized as winners of the sixth-annual Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize for their development of a training portal to help health care professionals better understand the needs of at-risk populations. CaringWithCompassion.org is an online, modular curriculum that covers public healthcare systems and bio-psychosocial care for the underserved and is supplemented by a novel, game-based learning tool. Learn more...

Mon, June 06, 2016

A recent internet study on the effect of the VAERS (Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System) on vaccine acceptance and trust was featured in "The Conversation." This study found telling participants about VAERS, without having them read the actual reports, improved vaccine acceptance only very slightly. However, when participants read the detailed reports, both vaccine acceptance and trust in the CDC’s conclusion that vaccines are safe declined significantly. This was true, even though the vast majority of respondents believed that the vaccine caused few or none of the reported deaths and disabilities.

For the original study:

Scherer LD, Shaffer VA, Patel N, Zikmund-Fisher BJ. Can the vaccine adverse event reporting system be used to increase vaccine acceptance and trust?. Vaccine. 2016 May 5;34(21):2424-9.

Research Topics: 

Dr. Andrew Barnosky stepped down from his role as Adult Ethics Committee chair, which is a position he has served for the last 16 years. CBSSM Faculty member Dr. Andrew G. Shuman will be the new committee chair. Dr. Barnosky will continue as a member of the faculty and a member of the Committee. The UMHS press release can be found here.

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, is the senior author on a study led by Donna M. Zulman, MD, that reveals about a third of doctors and their patients with diabetes do not agree on which of the patient's health conditions is most important. In the study, 38% of physicians (compared to 18% of patients) ranked hypertension as the most important condition. Patients were more likely to prioritize symptoms such as pain and depression. Read the article, in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, here. Read a press release about the article here.

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