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Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, is the senior author on a study led by Donna M. Zulman, MD, that reveals about a third of doctors and their patients with diabetes do not agree on which of the patient's health conditions is most important. In the study, 38% of physicians (compared to 18% of patients) ranked hypertension as the most important condition. Patients were more likely to prioritize symptoms such as pain and depression. Read the article, in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, here. Read a press release about the article here.

Jacob Seagull, Ph.D., assistant professor of medical education, was part of a team recognized as winners of the sixth-annual Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize for their development of a training portal to help health care professionals better understand the needs of at-risk populations. CaringWithCompassion.org is an online, modular curriculum that covers public healthcare systems and bio-psychosocial care for the underserved and is supplemented by a novel, game-based learning tool. Learn more...

Mon, June 06, 2016

A recent internet study on the effect of the VAERS (Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System) on vaccine acceptance and trust was featured in "The Conversation." This study found telling participants about VAERS, without having them read the actual reports, improved vaccine acceptance only very slightly. However, when participants read the detailed reports, both vaccine acceptance and trust in the CDC’s conclusion that vaccines are safe declined significantly. This was true, even though the vast majority of respondents believed that the vaccine caused few or none of the reported deaths and disabilities.

For the original study:

Scherer LD, Shaffer VA, Patel N, Zikmund-Fisher BJ. Can the vaccine adverse event reporting system be used to increase vaccine acceptance and trust?. Vaccine. 2016 May 5;34(21):2424-9.

Research Topics: 

Dr. Andrew Barnosky stepped down from his role as Adult Ethics Committee chair, which is a position he has served for the last 16 years. CBSSM Faculty member Dr. Andrew G. Shuman will be the new committee chair. Dr. Barnosky will continue as a member of the faculty and a member of the Committee. The UMHS press release can be found here.

Dr. Jason Karlawish, Professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania, will discuss his forthcoming novel, "Open Wound: The Tragic Obsession of Dr. William Beaumont" on Thursday, October 20, 3-5 pm, at the Biomedical Research Science Building (BSRB), Room 1130.  "Open Wound" is a fictional account of true events along the early 19th century American frontier, tracing the relationship between Dr. William Beaumont and his illiterate French Canadian patient.  The young trapper sustains an injury that never heals, leaving a hole in his stomach that the curious doctor uses as a window both to understand the mysteries of digestion and to advance his career.  A reception will follow the talk, and books will be available for purchase on site from Nicola's Books.  The event is co-sponsored by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, the Center for the History of Medicine, and the University of Michigan Press.  Click here for more information about the book. 

Tue, September 20, 2011

The CBS News website recently featured 10 tips to make better decisions about cancer care from U-M’s Angela Fagerlin, Ph.D., associate professor of internal medicine. Below is an excerpt from the article:

Cancer is scary, and doctors sometimes sound as if they’re speaking a foreign language when talking about the disease and its treatment. But “people are making life and death decisions that may affect their survival and they need to know what they’re getting themselves into,” says Fagerlin “Cancer treatments and tests can be serious. Patients need to know what kind of side effects they might experience as a result of the treatment they undergo.”

 

Tue, January 10, 2017

Geoffrey Barnes was featured in a recent MHealth Lab article, "Medication Adherence a Problem in Atrial Fibrillation Patients." Dr. Barnes is the lead author of JAMA Cardiology article, which reports that while anticoagulant therapy is important for stroke prevention in people with atrial fibrillation, many people don’t stick with it for various reasons (side effects, physician advice, etc.).

CBSSM affiliates will be presenting at the WMU Ethics Center Conference: "Bioethics: Preparing for the Unknown" (March 17-18th).

CBSSM Postdoc Kayte Spector-Bagdady: “The Google of Personalized Healthcare: 23andMe and Enabling the Privatization of Genetic Biobanking"

Lan Le, Natalie Bartnik, Michele C. Gornick and Nicole Exe: “Examining the Psychosocial and Ethical Issues Arising from the Identification, Disclosure and Communication of Genomic Results to Patients and Clinicians,” Chair: Raymond De Vries

Other presentations with CBSSM/UM bioethics connections include:

"Patient Understanding and Satisfaction Regarding the Clinical Use of Whole
Genome Sequencing: Findings from the MedSeq Project," Archana Bharadwaj, School of Public Health

"The Voice is As Mighty as the Pen: Integrating Conversations Into Advance Care
Planning Policies," Kunal Bailoor, UM Medical School

Here is the link to the the program: http://www.mywmu.com/s/1428/images/gid2/editor_documents/events/prelimin...

Here is the link to register: http://www.mywmu.com/s/1428/gid2/index.aspx?sid=1428&gid=2&pgid=2900&con...

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) invited three speakers to provide their insights on the importance of professional ethics and professionalism in neuroscience research on February 10th. The speakers included Nicholas Steneck, Ph.D., Director of the Research Ethics and Integrity Program of the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research; David E. Wright, Ph.D., Director of the Office of Research Integrity at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; and Peggy Mason, Ph.D., Chair of the Society for Neuroscience’s Ethics Committee.

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