Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query about us interactive decision month 2016 06.

Page not found

You are here

Patients’ Attitudes toward Considering Cost When Making Medical Decisions (Oct-13)

Imagine that for the last three months, you have had a very bad headache – the worst in your life – that won’t go away, even when you take aspirin. In addition to the headache you have also been feeling dizzy. Your doctor tells you that you need to get a brain scan to test whether the headache is being caused by something serious. There are two possible scans you can get: a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or a Computerized Axial Tomography (CT) scan.  The MRI provides a slightly more detailed picture and might find something that the CT misses, such as an extremely uncommon blood vessel problem, but nearly all problems serious enough to need treatment would be seen on either the MRI or the CT.

Mon, June 06, 2016

A recent internet study on the effect of the VAERS (Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System) on vaccine acceptance and trust was featured in "The Conversation." This study found telling participants about VAERS, without having them read the actual reports, improved vaccine acceptance only very slightly. However, when participants read the detailed reports, both vaccine acceptance and trust in the CDC’s conclusion that vaccines are safe declined significantly. This was true, even though the vast majority of respondents believed that the vaccine caused few or none of the reported deaths and disabilities.

For the original study:

Scherer LD, Shaffer VA, Patel N, Zikmund-Fisher BJ. Can the vaccine adverse event reporting system be used to increase vaccine acceptance and trust?. Vaccine. 2016 May 5;34(21):2424-9.

Research Topics: 

Check out Sarah Hawley's IHPI profile as this month's featured member here.

What We Do

RESEARCH

Research has been the focus and the strength of the faculty members affiliated with CBSSM. Researchers have pursued groundbreaking investigations topics such as:

  • doctor-patient communication
  • psychological adaptation to disability
  • health care rationing
  • social cognition
  • decision aids to communicate risk
  • informed consent
  • deliberative democracy

EDUCATION

An important mission of CBSSM is to extend the ethics education medical students receive at the University of Michigan. Our current curriculum efforts are focused on enriching the existing curriculum and on making instruction on medical ethics for undergraduate medical students at UM more systematic and focused. Our goal is to increase medical student interest in ethics and their competence in recognizing and resolving ethical issues. Our strategy is to weave ethics into the curriculum throughout the 4 years of training in a way that allows students to build upon what they know of ethical theory and to apply that knowledge to their clinical practice. Additionally, given CBSSM faculty expertise, our aim is to create novel ethics curriculum components that incorporate our empirical work in bioethics and our particular expertise in decision science. 

POLICY/OUTREACH

CBSSM scholars perform the basic and applied scientific research that will improve health care policy and practice, to benefit patients and their families, health care providers, third-party payers, policy makers, and the general public. In our Decision of the Month web feature, we turn a recent research finding into an interactive decision that a patient or a policy maker might face.

PROGRAM IN CLINICAL ETHICS

The Program in Clinical Ethics within CBSSM represents an expansion of existing services designed to promote a culture of patient-centered excellence by developing a comprehensive set of ethics-related activities.  The aims of this program are to: liaise with and provide support to the adult and pediatrics ethics committees; streamline clinical ethics consultation; assist with ethics-related policy development on a regular and proactive basis; organize and administer structured educational programs in clinical ethics; and coordinate empiric research with relevance to clinical ethics within CBSSM.

 

BROCHER RESIDENCIES 2016 -- CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The Brocher Foundation offers visiting researchers the opportunity to come at the Brocher Centre in a peaceful park on the shores of Lake Geneva, to write a book, articles, an essay or a PhD thesis. The visiting positions are an occasion to meet other researchers from different disciplines and countries as well as experts from numerous International Organizations & Non Governmental Organizations based in Geneva, such as WHO, WTO, WIPO, UNHCR, ILO, WMA, ICRC, and others. The Brocher Foundation residencies last between 1 and 4 months.

They give researchers (PhD students to Professors) the opportunity to work at the Brocher Centre on projects on the ethical, legal and social implications for humankind of recent medical research and new technologies. Researchers can also apply with one or two other researchers to work on a collaborative project.

CHECK CONDITIONS AND APPLY ON WWW.BROCHER.CH/CALLS

Target specific oral anticoagulants (TSOAC)s including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban represent novel alternatives to vitamin K antagonists. These medications provide an attractive choice for both physicians and patients alike due to their predictable pharmacokinetics, fixed-dose regimens, lack of routine monitoring, and fewer drug-drug interactions as compared to warfarin. However, these anticoagulants are not without their own unique features and risks, including required dose adjustments for patient specific factors such as renal function, weight, and age, and lack of a routine monitoring parameter to follow patient adherence with therapy. In addition, the cost of TSOACs and the growing number of indications they are currently approved for makes ensuring affordability as well as the correct dosage based on indication for therapy extremely important.

PI(s): Geoffrey Barnes

Co-I(s): Emily Ashjian

Bioethics Grand Rounds - Dr. Michael Jibson

Wed, August 26, 2015, 12:00pm
Location: 
Ford Auditorium

This month's grand rounds features: Michael Jibson, MD, Psychiatry Department speaking about "Psychiatry, Law, and Society: Ethical and Legal Issues in Mental Health"

Lunch provided!

Please join us for a lively discussion of medical ethics. The Bioethics Grand Rounds is co-sponsored by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, the UMHS Adult and Pediatric Medical Ethics Committee, and the Program of Society and Medicine. This educational session is open to all faculty and staff and members of the public. CME credit is available. 

To meet ACCME requirements for Faculty Planner disclosure and Presenter Disclosure to participants of CME activities at UM, please be advised that the following faculty planner(s)/co-planner(s) and presenter have no personal financial relationships relevant to the activity listed below:
Planners: 

  • Andrew Shuman, MD
  • Christian Vercler, MD

Jeff Kullgren's editorial "Injecting Facts Into the Heated Debates Over Medicaid Expansion" was recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. In this editorial, Dr. Kullgren reviews Wherry and Miller's study on the effects of ACA on coverage, access, utilization, and health. 

Wherry LR, Miller S. Early coverage, access, utilization, and health effects associated with the Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansions. A quasi-experimental study. Ann Intern Med 2016

Link to IHPI article.

Journeys in Genetics: Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications

Tue, September 27, 2016, 3:00pm
Location: 
2610 SPH I

Journeys in Genetics: Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications
with Toby Citrin, J.D. and Scott Roberts, Ph.D.


September 27, 2016
3:00 - 4:00 p.m.
2610 SPH I
1415 Washington Heights
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029


Sponsored by Certificate Program in Public Health Genetics 20th Anniversary Seminar Series


"Journeys in Genetics" is an interactive series of seminars that will highlight the unique personal and professional paths that the Certificate Program in Public Health Genetics (CPHG) faculty members have traversed throughout their careers in the field of public health genetics. In this seminar, Professor Citrin will describe a phone call from Detroit's Mayor in 1970, a request from Francis Collins in the early '90s, creation of the Center for Public Health and Community Genomics in 2001, and projects engaging minority communities in learning about genetics and helping to shape policies to guide the field. Professor Roberts will discuss his research program on how individuals appraise and respond to personal genetic information in contexts including genetic susceptibility testing for Alzheimer's disease, cancer genomics, and direct-to-consumer genetic testing.

Funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs

Funding Years: 2007-2012

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related death among men in the United States, and accounts for 29% of all cancers diagnosed in men. Furthermore, approximately one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. Thus, 17% of male Veterans will be asked to make a decision about the treatment of their prostate cancer. The burden of this disease is further magnified when one considers that most patients will live for years following their diagnosis and with any adverse effects of therapy. Given that there have been no clinical trials showing that any prostate cancer treatment produces an increased likelihood of survival; men are asked to actively participate in treatment decisions. Previous research has revealed that men are often uninformed about their prostate cancer, particularly African American men and men with lower educational attainment. Thus, it is critical to develop and test decision aids that can help all men (especially men with low literacy skills) make an informed decision. The goal of the study was to compare the impact of a plain language decision aid (DA) to a conventional DA on prostate cancer patients’ decision making experience and communication with their physician.

PI(s): Angela Fagerlin, PhD and Peter A. Ubel, MD

Co-I(s): Khaled Hafez, MD; Bruce Ling, MD; Jeffrey Gingrich, MD; Sara Knight, PhD; Phillip Walther, MD; Margaret Holmes-Rovner, PhD; James Tulsky, MD; Stewart Alexander, PhD


 


 


 

 

Pages