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Attitudes toward Return of Secondary Results in Genomic Sequencing (Sep-16)

Imagine you are at the doctor’s office because you (or your child) have a serious health condition like heart disease or cancer. To help find out whether any treatment options exist, your doctor suggests that you (or your child) have your genome sequenced.

Genome sequencing may provide information about your (or your child’s) current health condition. However, the genome sequencing could reveal additional and unexpected results not related to the current condition. The doctor wants to know what types of these secondary results you would want to be told.

Thu, July 14, 2016

A new article in The Conversation authored by CBSSM Co-Director Raymond De Vries and colleague Tom Tomlinson from Michigan State University explores ethical concerns that may arise when patients donate blood and tissue samples to biobanks.

The article highlights results from their national survey, which indicated that respondents were not solely concerned with privacy, but had moral concerns about how their donations could be used in future research.

Wed, May 18, 2016

Reshma Jagsi’s survey of high-achieving physician-scientists published in JAMA, found that nearly a third of women reported experiencing sexual harassment. As women now make up about half of medical school students, the researchers emphasize the importance of recognizing unconscious bias as well as overtly inappropriate behaviors.

1. Reshma Jagsi, Kent A. Griffith, Rochelle Jones, Chithra R. Perumalswami, Peter Ubel, Abigail Stewart. Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Experiences of Academic Medical Faculty. JAMA, 2016; 315 (19): 2120 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.2188

Research Topics: 

Raymond De Vries is involved in a new research study led by Akbar Waljee, MD, MSc, which will develop a risk-based strategy to help providers tailor timing of treatments among CHC Veterans to ensure that those who most need urgent therapy get it as quickly as possible.

Using democratic deliberation, Dr. De Vries will engage Veterans to learn their thoughts and preferences about such a strategy, which will help with its implementation in a clinical setting.

Click here for more details.

Mon, January 30, 2017

Kayte Spector-Bagdady has a new commentary out in The Conversation about the law and ethics of research with human biospecimens. It focuses on the recently published revisions to the human subjects research regulations, highlights the debate that ensued from a draft version over its proposal to include nonidentified biospecimens in its definition of "human subject," and summarizes where the final rule landed and possible steps going forward.

Research Topics: 

Panel Discussion: Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Genetics and Newborn Screening

Mon, September 25, 2017, 6:00pm
Location: 
Vandenberg Room, Michigan League

Join Joselin Linder, author of “The Family Gene”, and Jodyn Platt, assistant professor in the U-M Medical School in a panel discussion about the ethical, legal, and social implications of genetics and newborn screening. The conversation will be moderated by Kayte Spector-Bagdady, assistant professor in the U-M Medical School and chief of the research ethics service in the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine.

Wed, October 11, 2017

In an editorial in Nature Human Behaviour, Brian Zikmund-Fisher discusses the findings of a recent study about the unintended consequences of argument dilution in direct-to-consumer drug advertising. In a series of experiments, study authors, Niro Sivanathan and Hemant Kakker found that long lists of serious and minor side effects found in drug advertisements actually "dilute" consumers' judgments of the overall risk from side effects.

Funded by National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2011-2016

This proposal seeks to advance our understanding of the role of psychosocial and environmental health risk factors as well as medical care in understanding the large socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in health and the way health changes with age in our society. It does so by proposing to extend to four waves and 15 years of follow-up an ongoing prospective study (known as Americans' Changing Lives) of a nationally representative sample of 3,617 adults aged 25 and over in the coterminous United States, who were first interviewed in 1986, with reinterviews of about 83 percent of the surviving members of the original sample already completed in 1989 and 1994, along with ongoing mortality ascertainment on the full original 1986 sample. A proposed fourth wave would be collected on about 83 percent of the surviving sample (estimated respondents - 2,300 of about 2,800 survivors) in 2001, primarily by telephone and in person as necessary, with mortality ascertainment continuing indefinitely and the hope and intent of reinterviewing surviving respondents again about 20-22.5 years after the baseline interview. The ongoing ACL study has generated a large body of publications both by staff of the ACL project and users of the public use data sets for the first two waves (with the third wave to be archived for public use by the end of 1999). ACL analyses and publications have illuminated to the role of a broad range of psychosocial factors, ranging from health behaviors through stress and adaptive resources to productive activities, in predicting health, changes in health and mortality, and in mediating or explaining socioeconomic differences in health. It has also played a major role in understanding the nature, causes, and consequences of paid and unpaid productive activities over the lifecourse. The proposed continuation and extension of the ACL project will address a number of aims: (1) continuing and enhancing ongoing analysis by extending prospective follow-up to 15 years, allowing for better analysis of- (a) time- varying covariates, (b) the impact of changes in risk factors on changes in health, and (c) potential reciprocal relationships between and among SES, psychosocial risk factors and health; (2) enhancing and improving the measurement of a number of variables already being considered in ongoing analysis, including SES (e.g., improving assessment of wealth), productive activities, religious beliefs and behaviors, and personality or dispositional factors (e.g., hostility, optimism, hopelessness, and John Henryism); (3) adding new measures to ACL 4 or (via archival data) to all waves of data for both medical care and exposures in physical and social environments; and (4) to undertake more focused analysis of racial/ethnic differences in health and explanations of them.

PI(s): Sarah Burgard

Co-I(s): Wen Ye, Michael Elliott, Philippa Clarke, Kenneth Langa

Thu, July 26, 2018

A new study published in Cancer by Reshma Jagsi and colleagues found that many patients experience a heavy financial impact from their diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer, and that they feel their doctors’ offices aren’t adequately addressing these concerns. Dr. Jagsi was also interviewed by Michigan Radio about this study. CBSSM faculty Sarah Hawley was also an author on this study.

Wed, October 03, 2018

Only a small percentage of people in their 50s and early 60s have had their DNA tested – either for medical reasons, to learn their ancestry or out of curiosity – but far more have an interest in getting such tests done, according to a new National Poll on Healthy Aging. Scott Roberts, PhD also discusses the risks of direct-to-consumer testing such as learning out about risks for serious disease and the risk of false positives.

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