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Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Funding years: 2009-2013

This grant supports a study to understand the barriers facing physician faculty researchers and women, in particular, by assessing gender differences in access to research time, mentoring, and institutional support and to understand the mechanisms by which gender differences in outcomes develop among career development awardees. Deliverables will include annual written reports about project status to RWJF and the PFSP National Program Office and attendance at the annual PFSP national meeting and one other scientific meeting annually of the Scholar's choosing, as applicable to the project.

More information: http://www.rwjf.org/en/grants/grant-records/2009/06/mixed-qualitative-and-quantitative-investigation-into-the-barrie.html

PI: Reshma Jagsi

Fri, February 28, 2014

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was quoted in a Scientific American article about risk communication of certain chemicals in the lives of expectant parents. He explains, “Look at your life and the choices you make, and do things that can make you safer easily, but don't overreact to anything ... There are very, very few things out there that have such huge effects on our lives or our baby's lives that one teeny bit of exposure is going to make a difference.”

Raymond De Vries is co-author on a new publication in Academic Medicine, highlighting a successful model for collaboration which was developed in the early phases of a grant funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation nearly five years ago. The Collaborative Health Alliance for Reshaping Training, Education, and Research (CHARTER) project expanded the partnerships between the University of Michigan and several Ghanaian academic institutions to enhance health care provider education and build and/or increase research capacity. One of the early goals of the grant was to establish guiding principles for engagement through a Charter of Collaboration.


Read more about the partnership through UMHS News and the origional PubMed article.

Thu, September 18, 2014

A new study put out by senior author Beth Tarini, MD, MS, shows that primary care doctors report challenges to incorporating genetics assessments in routine primary care. Dr. Tarini commented, "Genetics is not just about rare diseases and specialists. PCPs [Primary Care physicians] rely on genetics frequently during preventive care visits – especially when taking family histories and assessing a patient’s risk of more common, but chronic, diseases. So the fact that PCPs report many barriers to embracing and performing these tasks is concerning," The study also found that many Primary Care physicians feel as though their expertise on genetic medicine is insufficient.

Mon, January 05, 2015

Reshma Jagsi was interviewed by mCancerTalk for the article, “Is your course of radiation treatment longer than it needs to be?” which focuses on two of her radiation treatment studies. In one of her studies, looking at a national database of patients, she and her colleagues found that hypofractionated radiation therapy was used in only 13.6% of Medicare patients with breast cancer. In Michigan, Jagsi’s other study found, fewer than one-third of patients who fit the criteria for offering this approach got the shorter course of treatment.

Read Dr. Jagsi’s paper about hypofractionation use nationally and in Michigan.

CBSSM Seminar: Stephen Molldrem, PhD Candidate

Thu, July 07, 2016, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC Building 16, Conference Rm 266C

Stephen Molldrem, PhD Candidate, American Culture

Title: Collecting and Managing Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data in Health Contexts: Bioethical Dilemmas from a Queer Historical Perspective

Abstract: This talk, drawn from dissertation research, historicizes a number of regulatory changes governing the collection and management of sexual orientation and gender identity data in health contexts in the United States that have taken place since 2009. It focuses on a range of less-considered bioethical dilemmas that stem from the introduction of questions about sexual orientation and gender identity into the battery of demographic information collected in certified Electronic Health Record technologies.

Attitudes toward Return of Secondary Results in Genomic Sequencing (Sep-16)

Imagine you are at the doctor’s office because you (or your child) have a serious health condition like heart disease or cancer. To help find out whether any treatment options exist, your doctor suggests that you (or your child) have your genome sequenced.

Genome sequencing may provide information about your (or your child’s) current health condition. However, the genome sequencing could reveal additional and unexpected results not related to the current condition. The doctor wants to know what types of these secondary results you would want to be told.

Thu, July 14, 2016

A new article in The Conversation authored by CBSSM Co-Director Raymond De Vries and colleague Tom Tomlinson from Michigan State University explores ethical concerns that may arise when patients donate blood and tissue samples to biobanks.

The article highlights results from their national survey, which indicated that respondents were not solely concerned with privacy, but had moral concerns about how their donations could be used in future research.

Wed, May 18, 2016

Reshma Jagsi’s survey of high-achieving physician-scientists published in JAMA, found that nearly a third of women reported experiencing sexual harassment. As women now make up about half of medical school students, the researchers emphasize the importance of recognizing unconscious bias as well as overtly inappropriate behaviors.

1. Reshma Jagsi, Kent A. Griffith, Rochelle Jones, Chithra R. Perumalswami, Peter Ubel, Abigail Stewart. Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Experiences of Academic Medical Faculty. JAMA, 2016; 315 (19): 2120 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.2188

Research Topics: 

Funded by National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2011-2016

This proposal seeks to advance our understanding of the role of psychosocial and environmental health risk factors as well as medical care in understanding the large socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in health and the way health changes with age in our society. It does so by proposing to extend to four waves and 15 years of follow-up an ongoing prospective study (known as Americans' Changing Lives) of a nationally representative sample of 3,617 adults aged 25 and over in the coterminous United States, who were first interviewed in 1986, with reinterviews of about 83 percent of the surviving members of the original sample already completed in 1989 and 1994, along with ongoing mortality ascertainment on the full original 1986 sample. A proposed fourth wave would be collected on about 83 percent of the surviving sample (estimated respondents - 2,300 of about 2,800 survivors) in 2001, primarily by telephone and in person as necessary, with mortality ascertainment continuing indefinitely and the hope and intent of reinterviewing surviving respondents again about 20-22.5 years after the baseline interview. The ongoing ACL study has generated a large body of publications both by staff of the ACL project and users of the public use data sets for the first two waves (with the third wave to be archived for public use by the end of 1999). ACL analyses and publications have illuminated to the role of a broad range of psychosocial factors, ranging from health behaviors through stress and adaptive resources to productive activities, in predicting health, changes in health and mortality, and in mediating or explaining socioeconomic differences in health. It has also played a major role in understanding the nature, causes, and consequences of paid and unpaid productive activities over the lifecourse. The proposed continuation and extension of the ACL project will address a number of aims: (1) continuing and enhancing ongoing analysis by extending prospective follow-up to 15 years, allowing for better analysis of- (a) time- varying covariates, (b) the impact of changes in risk factors on changes in health, and (c) potential reciprocal relationships between and among SES, psychosocial risk factors and health; (2) enhancing and improving the measurement of a number of variables already being considered in ongoing analysis, including SES (e.g., improving assessment of wealth), productive activities, religious beliefs and behaviors, and personality or dispositional factors (e.g., hostility, optimism, hopelessness, and John Henryism); (3) adding new measures to ACL 4 or (via archival data) to all waves of data for both medical care and exposures in physical and social environments; and (4) to undertake more focused analysis of racial/ethnic differences in health and explanations of them.

PI(s): Sarah Burgard

Co-I(s): Wen Ye, Michael Elliott, Philippa Clarke, Kenneth Langa

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