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Thu, May 26, 2011

Raymond De Vries was appointed Professor of Midwifery Science at the University of Maastricht (Netherlands) in November 2010.  As is the custom in European universities, he delivered an inaugural lecture, outlining the educational and research goals of his professorship on May 26, 2011.  It was preceded by a research symposium focusing on risk in maternity care, with speakers exploring the way risk is measured and used by care providers and the way pregnant women respond to assessments of risk they are given. Click here to view a video of his inaugural address, which is in English. Click here for a news article about Dr. De Vries, in Dutch.

Michael Poulin,PhD, has joined the faculty at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York (SUNY) as an AssistantProfessor of Psychology. Dr. Poulin was a post-doctoral fellow at CBSSM for twoyears, under the mentorship of StephanieBrown, PhD.  During this time he was anactive member of the CBSSM research community and a delightful colleague. Dr. Poulin's research focuses on the effects of stress on health and well-being, especiallythe ways people cope with stressful events. He examines how people's beliefsabout the world, including religious beliefs and beliefs about thetrustworthiness of others, influence adjustment to stress.  

Co-sponsored by the Center for Ethics in Public Life and the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, the 2nd annual Bioethics Colloquium took place on Friday, May 20, 8:30-3:30 pm, in the Alumni Center.  The colloquium featured presentations of research in or about bioethics conducted by U-M faculty, fellows, and students.

The keynote speaker was Susan Dorr Goold, MD, MHSA, MA, who gave a talk entitled, "Market failures, moral failures, and health reform."

Nearly 70 people attended the event, which featured 10 presentations by faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students drawn from a variety of disciplines.

On September 10-11, 2010, the Public Deliberation, Ethics and Health Policy Symposium was held on the U-M campus in Ann Arbor.  Jointly funded by a University of Michigan Center for Ethics in Public Life program grant and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the symposium was coordinated by Dr. Susan Goold, together with Julia Abelson at McMaster University and Erika Blacksher at the University of Washington.

The purpose of the inaugural symposium was to reflect on questions about the rationale, methods, and use of public deliberation for addressing complex and morally challenging health policy problems.  Invited participants included CBSSM co-director Scott Kim and Raymond De Vries.

Thu, July 21, 2011

A recently-published article by Susan Goold in the American Journal of Bioethics was the topic of a press release by the University of Michigan Health System.  Click here to view the press release and to read the editorial written by Goold and her colleague Matthew Wynia.  The article calls for engaging the public in deliberations about health care spending, especially what counts as a decent minimum set of health benefits, and was written in response to a paper by Lawrence J. Schneiderman, MD, of the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego.

Research Topics: 

Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Funding years: 2009-2013

This grant supports a study to understand the barriers facing physician faculty researchers and women, in particular, by assessing gender differences in access to research time, mentoring, and institutional support and to understand the mechanisms by which gender differences in outcomes develop among career development awardees. Deliverables will include annual written reports about project status to RWJF and the PFSP National Program Office and attendance at the annual PFSP national meeting and one other scientific meeting annually of the Scholar's choosing, as applicable to the project.

More information: http://www.rwjf.org/en/grants/grant-records/2009/06/mixed-qualitative-and-quantitative-investigation-into-the-barrie.html

PI: Reshma Jagsi

Fri, February 28, 2014

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was quoted in a Scientific American article about risk communication of certain chemicals in the lives of expectant parents. He explains, “Look at your life and the choices you make, and do things that can make you safer easily, but don't overreact to anything ... There are very, very few things out there that have such huge effects on our lives or our baby's lives that one teeny bit of exposure is going to make a difference.”

Tue, April 08, 2014

Lewis Morgenstern’ s stroke education study offered in public schools in Texas to help children recognize symptoms of stroke is cited by Yahoo News, NPR, Fox News, and many other news outlets. Morgenstern was quoted, "The data was highly positive in terms of knowledge about stroke and their intention to call 911... The earlier we can make people aware of stroke and that it's arguably the most treatable of all catastrophic conditions, the better off we will be."
 

Research Topics: 

Raymond De Vries is co-author on a new publication in Academic Medicine, highlighting a successful model for collaboration which was developed in the early phases of a grant funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation nearly five years ago. The Collaborative Health Alliance for Reshaping Training, Education, and Research (CHARTER) project expanded the partnerships between the University of Michigan and several Ghanaian academic institutions to enhance health care provider education and build and/or increase research capacity. One of the early goals of the grant was to establish guiding principles for engagement through a Charter of Collaboration.


Read more about the partnership through UMHS News and the origional PubMed article.

Thu, September 18, 2014

A new study put out by senior author Beth Tarini, MD, MS, shows that primary care doctors report challenges to incorporating genetics assessments in routine primary care. Dr. Tarini commented, "Genetics is not just about rare diseases and specialists. PCPs [Primary Care physicians] rely on genetics frequently during preventive care visits – especially when taking family histories and assessing a patient’s risk of more common, but chronic, diseases. So the fact that PCPs report many barriers to embracing and performing these tasks is concerning," The study also found that many Primary Care physicians feel as though their expertise on genetic medicine is insufficient.

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