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Partners

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine is supported by the Dean's Office at University of Michigan Medical School, the Office of Clinical Affairs, and the Department of Internal Medicine.

CBSSM is a collaborating center of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy & Innovation (IHPI). IHPI works to enhance the health and well-being of local, national, and global populations through innovative, interdisciplinary health services research that effectively informs public and private efforts to optimize the quality, safety, equity, and affordability of healthcare services.

CBSSM has strong research ties with numerous other units at the University of Michigan, including the Department of Psychology, the School of Public Health, the School of Information, and the Survey Research Center at the Institute for Social Research.

Of particular interest to those in the field of genomics is the ELSI Personal Genomics group at the University of Michigan: Exploring the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Personal Genomics. 

In the broader realm of decision making, the Decision Consortium group at the University of Michigan is an excellent resource, offering weekly forums during the academic year. 

The Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences at Michigan State University has posted information about its 2011-12 Brown Bag/Webinar Series.  All sessions take place 12-1 pm in C-102 East Fee Hall on the East Lansing campus.  Sessions for the fall include:
September 7: Helen Veit, PhD, "The ethics of aging in an age of youth: Rising life expectancy in the early twentieth century United States"
October 19: Scott Kim, MD, PhD, "Democratic deliberation about surrogate consent for dementia research"
November 10: Stuart J. Youngner, MD, "Regulated euthanasia in the Netherlands: Is it working?"
December 7: Karen Meagher, PhD candidate, "Trustworthiness in public health practice"
See www.bioethics.msu.edu/ for more information.

This National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)-funded study seeks to explore the mental conceptualizations of risk of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) among residents in Midland/Saginaw (M/S), Michigan, who live in areas that have been exposed to DLCs.  The CPOD study is using a combination of in-depth qualitative "mental models" interviews (for comparison with an "expert" model) and a larger, population-based survey questionnaire to yield a rich base of knowledge and information about community members' beliefs and understandings about dioxins and dioxin-related health risks.  This, in turn, will inform evidence-based recommendations for designing better, more appropriate risk communication messages for the community and for other dioxin exposure assessment studies.  Specifically, we seek to distinguish between those dioxin-related concepts, facts, or beliefs that are already well understood by most community members (which therefore could be minimized in future communications) from those misconceptions or factual omissions that most directly inhibit effective risk management by community members.  We are also contrasting models of people who know their personal exposure (through prior participation in the University of Michigan Dioxin Exposure Study) versus those who do not.  Brian Zikmund-Fisher is the PI of this study.

Funded by Department of Veterans Affairs

Funding Years: 2009-2012

Because CRC-predictive genetic tests offer the potential to optimize CRC screening efforts, improving the communication and use of such tests by the millions of veterans who are screened for CRC each year could result in both improved cancer surveillance and more efficient (and potentially reduced) VA resource utilization. Our study will provide empirical data about practical risk communication methods that can be used in the future by VA clinicians to present genetic tests to veterans and about patient-level barriers which will inhibit acceptance of genetic tests that predict colorectal cancer risk within the VA patient population. By evaluating alternate methods of communicating genetic test results before such tests actually become available, we hope to identify optimal approaches that can be integrated into VA genomics initiatives from the very start.

Angela Fagerlin (PI)

Thu, July 25, 2013

Dr. Arul Chinnaiyan and his team have been awarded 1 of 4 research grants ($7.97 million pending) from the National Institutes of Health to explore the use of genome sequencing in medical care. The new grants are funded as part of the National Human Genome Research Institute's (NHGRI) Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) program. NHGRI is part of NIH.

The team will sequence the genomes of tumors from 500 patients with advanced sarcoma or other rare cancers to discover new information about genomic alterations, with the goal of eventually customizing therapies. Few clinical trials have been conducted in most rare cancers, and scientists would like to know more about the genetic underpinnings of these diseases. Investigators also plan to evaluate the patient consent process, and the delivery and use of genome sequencing results.

Several CBSSM-affiliated faculty are involved with this project, including Scott Kim, Scott Roberts, Raymond De Vries, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, as well as Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Michele Gornick.

Fri, August 16, 2013
1 in 5 women don't believe a tailored breast cancer risk assessment, according to a new study published by CBSSM researchers.

The findings were published in Patient Education and Counseling as part of a larger study where women participated in an online program to learn about medications that can reduce their risk of breast cancer. As part of the program, women who were at above-average risk of developing breast cancer received tailored information about their personal breast cancer risk. The risk assessment tool took into account family history and personal health habits, yet nearly 20 percent of women did not believe their breast cancer risk.

The study has also recently been discussed in CBS “Morning Rounds” (go to 1:45 of video clip) and NPR Shots.

Lead author Laura Scherer completed the research while serving as a CBSSM Post-Doctoral Research Fellow. Senior author Angela Fagerlin is the Co-Director of CBSSM and the Director of the CBSSM Post-Doctoral Fellowship Program.
Tue, March 27, 2018

U-M/AARP National Poll on Healthy Aging looks at perceived overuse of tests and medicines from the patient’s perspective. Doctors and older patients may disagree more often than either of them suspects about whether a particular medical test or medicine is truly necessary, according to findings from a new poll of Americans over age 50. Improving communication about that mismatch of opinions, the poll suggests, might reduce the use of unneeded scans, screenings, medications and procedures – and health care costs as well.

Jeffrey Kullgren designed the poll and analyzed its results. More details, a brief video, and a link to the full report of the findings and methodology can be found below.

Erica Sutton, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Erica Sutton was a CBSSM Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2013-2015. She is an interdisciplinary social scientist engaged in social and behavioral science research that explores the health care experiences of individuals living with rare genetic conditions; the manner in which biotechnologies shape personal experience and social life; and the ethical implications of these technologies for individuals, public health, social policy, health care institutions, and communities.

Last Name: 
Sutton
Thu, February 26, 2015

Joel Howell is co-author in a paper published in Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, “The heartfelt music of Ludwig van Beethoven.”  The paper analyzes several of Beethoven's compositions for clues of a heart condition some have speculated he had.

“His music may have been both figuratively and physically heartfelt,” says co-author Joel Howell, M.D., Ph.D, a professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School and member of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. “When your heart beats irregularly from heart disease, it does so in some predictable patterns. We think we hear some of those same patterns in his music.”

Goldberger ZD, Whiting SM, Howell JD. The heartfelt music of Ludwig van Beethoven. Perspect Biol Med. 2014 Spring;57(2):285-94. doi: 10.1353/pbm.2014.0013.

Research Topics: 

PIHCD: Kevin Kerber and Will Meurer

Thu, November 19, 2015, 2:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Dr. Kevin Kerber and Dr. Will Meurer will be presenting an implementation trial on the topic of diagnosis and treatment of benign positional vertigo in the emergency department. At this meeting, they will be discussing and seeking input regarding plans for the in-person provider training presentation. Part of the intervention is a website to educate and motivate providers. Please review the website prior to the meeting.

To access the educational website please go to www.dizztinct.com and sign up with your uniqname@med.umich.edu  email address and create a password.  After signing up, you'll receive an email with a link to click, in order to activate your account.

If you do not have a med.umich.edu email address, you can still get access by contacting Patty Johnson at johnspat@med.umich.edu

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