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Funded by Department of Veterans Affairs

Funding Years: 2009-2012

Because CRC-predictive genetic tests offer the potential to optimize CRC screening efforts, improving the communication and use of such tests by the millions of veterans who are screened for CRC each year could result in both improved cancer surveillance and more efficient (and potentially reduced) VA resource utilization. Our study will provide empirical data about practical risk communication methods that can be used in the future by VA clinicians to present genetic tests to veterans and about patient-level barriers which will inhibit acceptance of genetic tests that predict colorectal cancer risk within the VA patient population. By evaluating alternate methods of communicating genetic test results before such tests actually become available, we hope to identify optimal approaches that can be integrated into VA genomics initiatives from the very start.

Angela Fagerlin (PI)

Thu, July 25, 2013

Dr. Arul Chinnaiyan and his team have been awarded 1 of 4 research grants ($7.97 million pending) from the National Institutes of Health to explore the use of genome sequencing in medical care. The new grants are funded as part of the National Human Genome Research Institute's (NHGRI) Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) program. NHGRI is part of NIH.

The team will sequence the genomes of tumors from 500 patients with advanced sarcoma or other rare cancers to discover new information about genomic alterations, with the goal of eventually customizing therapies. Few clinical trials have been conducted in most rare cancers, and scientists would like to know more about the genetic underpinnings of these diseases. Investigators also plan to evaluate the patient consent process, and the delivery and use of genome sequencing results.

Several CBSSM-affiliated faculty are involved with this project, including Scott Kim, Scott Roberts, Raymond De Vries, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, as well as Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Michele Gornick.

Fri, August 16, 2013
1 in 5 women don't believe a tailored breast cancer risk assessment, according to a new study published by CBSSM researchers.

The findings were published in Patient Education and Counseling as part of a larger study where women participated in an online program to learn about medications that can reduce their risk of breast cancer. As part of the program, women who were at above-average risk of developing breast cancer received tailored information about their personal breast cancer risk. The risk assessment tool took into account family history and personal health habits, yet nearly 20 percent of women did not believe their breast cancer risk.

The study has also recently been discussed in CBS “Morning Rounds” (go to 1:45 of video clip) and NPR Shots.

Lead author Laura Scherer completed the research while serving as a CBSSM Post-Doctoral Research Fellow. Senior author Angela Fagerlin is the Co-Director of CBSSM and the Director of the CBSSM Post-Doctoral Fellowship Program.

CBSSM Seminar: Michele Gornick, PhD

Thu, January 15, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC 16-266C

Michele Gornick, PhD

VA HSRD Fellow & CBSSM Research Investigator

Title: The public’s preferences for the return of secondary findings identified through genome sequencing: Information and deliberation make a difference

Summary: Genomic sequencing is becoming a part of clinical practice. Existing studies are limited and conclude that people would like unrestricted access to all of their genetic information. However, we do not know the extent to which respondents in these studies took into account the complex scientific and ethical issues that attend genome sequencing. In order to address this gap, we organized a deliberative democracy (DD) session to educate members of the public on genome sequencing, to engage them in dialogue about the benefits and risks of the clinical implementation of this technology, and to elicit their informed perspectives about policies governing the return of secondary findings.

Tue, March 27, 2018

U-M/AARP National Poll on Healthy Aging looks at perceived overuse of tests and medicines from the patient’s perspective. Doctors and older patients may disagree more often than either of them suspects about whether a particular medical test or medicine is truly necessary, according to findings from a new poll of Americans over age 50. Improving communication about that mismatch of opinions, the poll suggests, might reduce the use of unneeded scans, screenings, medications and procedures – and health care costs as well.

Jeffrey Kullgren designed the poll and analyzed its results. More details, a brief video, and a link to the full report of the findings and methodology can be found below.

Lewis Morgenstern, MD

In early April 2008, CBSSM welcomed itsfirst doctoral fellow, Teresa Gavaruzzi.Ms. Gavaruzzi holdsdegrees in cognitive psychology and experimental psychology and is currently adoctoral student in cognitive psychology at the University of Padua in Italy. Under the mentorship of AngelaFagerlin, PhD, Teresa is participating especially in CBDSM research groupsrelated to patient decision making. For her doctoral dissertation, she’s examining factorsaffecting the perception and understanding of risks in medical choices and theimplications for informed consent, especially in screening for colorectalcancer and prostate cancer. An important part of her work is studying theeffects of message framing and format on behaviors.

 

Wed, June 04, 2014

A recent study, “Influence of “GERD” Label on Parents’ Decision to Medicate Infants” by CBSSM faculty Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Angela Fagerlin, and Beth Tarini was featured in a recent New York Times article. Laura Scherer, previous CBSSM postdoctoral fellow and current Assistant Professor at University of Missouri was lead author on the study.

Research Topics: 

PIHCD: Sarah Alvarez

Thu, November 05, 2015, 2:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Sarah Alvarez, a fellow at Stanford and formerly of Michigan Radio, will  present her work on creating a news product that can meet the information needs of low-income news consumers. Specifically her focus is on how to use data to discover which issues or systems information gaps exist for low-income news consumers and once the gaps are identified how the information should be presented to help people understand the information and use it to make decisions.

If you plan to attend this meeting please e-mail Nicole Exe at nexe@umich.edu by Monday November 2. If you decide to attend after that date you are still welcome and do not need to e-mail.

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, July 27, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Kunal Bailoor, MD Candidate Class of 2018, Ethics Path of Excellence

"Advance Care Planning: Beyond Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA)"

Abstract: Advance care planning is a crucial part of end of life medical care. It can take many forms, including designation of a surrogate decision maker via a DPOA document. However it can also involve living wills, physicians orders for life sustaining treatment (POLSTs), or even simply clinician patient conversation. The newly revised hospital policy on advance directives reflects this broader approach. The talk will include a brief review of the philosophical and ethical basis of advance care planning before diving into a discussion of the new hospital policy and it's impact on practice.

 

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