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Tue, March 27, 2018

U-M/AARP National Poll on Healthy Aging looks at perceived overuse of tests and medicines from the patient’s perspective. Doctors and older patients may disagree more often than either of them suspects about whether a particular medical test or medicine is truly necessary, according to findings from a new poll of Americans over age 50. Improving communication about that mismatch of opinions, the poll suggests, might reduce the use of unneeded scans, screenings, medications and procedures – and health care costs as well.

Jeffrey Kullgren designed the poll and analyzed its results. More details, a brief video, and a link to the full report of the findings and methodology can be found below.

In early April 2008, CBSSM welcomed itsfirst doctoral fellow, Teresa Gavaruzzi.Ms. Gavaruzzi holdsdegrees in cognitive psychology and experimental psychology and is currently adoctoral student in cognitive psychology at the University of Padua in Italy. Under the mentorship of AngelaFagerlin, PhD, Teresa is participating especially in CBDSM research groupsrelated to patient decision making. For her doctoral dissertation, she’s examining factorsaffecting the perception and understanding of risks in medical choices and theimplications for informed consent, especially in screening for colorectalcancer and prostate cancer. An important part of her work is studying theeffects of message framing and format on behaviors.

 

Wed, June 04, 2014

A recent study, “Influence of “GERD” Label on Parents’ Decision to Medicate Infants” by CBSSM faculty Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Angela Fagerlin, and Beth Tarini was featured in a recent New York Times article. Laura Scherer, previous CBSSM postdoctoral fellow and current Assistant Professor at University of Missouri was lead author on the study.

Research Topics: 

PIHCD: Sarah Alvarez

Thu, November 05, 2015, 2:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Sarah Alvarez, a fellow at Stanford and formerly of Michigan Radio, will  present her work on creating a news product that can meet the information needs of low-income news consumers. Specifically her focus is on how to use data to discover which issues or systems information gaps exist for low-income news consumers and once the gaps are identified how the information should be presented to help people understand the information and use it to make decisions.

If you plan to attend this meeting please e-mail Nicole Exe at nexe@umich.edu by Monday November 2. If you decide to attend after that date you are still welcome and do not need to e-mail.

CBSSM Seminar: Matthew Kay, PhD, MS

Wed, March 21, 2018, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Matthew Kay, PhD, MS
Assistant Professor of Information, School of Information and Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering

"Uncertainty visualization using discrete outcomes"

Abstract: Understanding uncertainty is necessary to make informed decisions from predictions: If my bus is predicted to arrive 10 minutes from now, what is the chance it actually shows up in 5 minutes—and more importantly, do I have time to get a coffee? I will outline a generalized approach to uncertainty visualization—discrete outcomes—that has found success in many contexts, including medical risk communication and hurricane path prediction, and give examples from my own work in transit arrival time prediction.

CBSSM Seminar: Akbar Waljee, MD, MSc

Tue, January 15, 2019, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC10-G065

CBSSM Seminar: Akbar Waljee, MD, MSc

“The Veteran Voice in Treatment Allocations for Hepatitis C: A Model for Policy Decision Making”

Abstract: Our objective was to explore, through Democratic Deliberation methods, whether Veterans at the Ann Arbor VA prefer a “First Come, First Serve” or “Sickest First” model for allocating treatment for Hepatitis-C when there are limited resources. In addition to expressing their policy preferences, Veterans offered nuanced insights into the treatment barriers Veterans are facing and how the VA may be able to overcome some of these barriers.

Thu, October 29, 2015

Jeremy Sussman has received much press for a recent study in JAMA about rates of treatment deintensification in diabetes. Dr. Sussman is first author of a study that found that among older diabetes patients whose treatment resulted in very low blood pressure, only a minority (27% or fewer) underwent treatment deintensification for diabetes, which represents a lost opportunity to reduce overtreatment. The study suggests practice guidelines and performance measures should place more focus on reducing overtreatment through deintensification.

Tanner Caverly and other CBSSM faculty co-authored a national survey study in JAMA examining VA primary care health-care professionals' beliefs regarding prescribing for older diabetics. This study found misperceptions about the benefits of stringent blood glucose control and concerns about negative repercussions following deintensification of therapy. This study is also being cited in a number of press articles.

Original studies:

Sussman, Jeremy B., Eve A. Kerr, Sameer D. Saini, Rob G. Holleman, Mandi L. Klamerus, Lillian C. Min, Sandeep Vijan, and Timothy P. Hofer. "Rates of Deintensification of Blood Pressure and Glycemic Medication Treatment Based on Levels of Control and Life Expectancy in Older Patients With Diabetes Mellitus." JAMA Internal Medicine (2015): 1-8.

Caverly, Tanner J., Angela Fagerlin, Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, Susan Kirsh, Jeffrey Todd Kullgren, Katherine Prenovost, and Eve A. Kerr. "Appropriate Prescribing for Patients With Diabetes at High Risk for Hypoglycemia: National Survey of Veterans Affairs Health Care Professionals." JAMA internal medicine (2015): 1-3.

2012 Bishop Lecture featuring Jerome Groopman, MD and Pamela Hartzband, MD

Thu, May 10, 2012 (All day)

The 2012 Bishop Lecture featured New York Times best selling authors, Jerome Groopman, MD, Dina and Raphael Recanati Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Pamela Hartzband, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Drs. Groopman and Hartzband jointly presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled, “When Experts Disagree: The Art of Medical Decision Making.” 

Drs. Groopman and Hartzband are co-authors of a 2011 book, “Your Medical Mind,” which outlines how patients can navigate health care choices when making medical decisions.  In addition to conducting research on blood development, cancer, and AIDS, Dr. Groopman writes regularly for the New Yorker, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The New Republic, and the Washington Post.  A noted endocrinologist and educator, Dr. Hartzband specializes in disorders of the thyroid, adrenal, and pituitary glands, and in women’s health.  She has authored articles on the impact of electronic records, uniform practice guidelines, monetary incentives, and the Internet on the culture of clinical care.  

  • Click here for the video recording of the 2012 Bishop Lecture.

Seated: Jerome Groopman and Pamela Hartzband 

Standing from Left: Scott Kim, Susan Goold, Angela Fagerlin, Christine Bishop, Jane Bishop, and David Bishop

 

 

 

Thu, May 26, 2011

Raymond De Vries was appointed Professor of Midwifery Science at the University of Maastricht (Netherlands) in November 2010.  As is the custom in European universities, he delivered an inaugural lecture, outlining the educational and research goals of his professorship on May 26, 2011.  It was preceded by a research symposium focusing on risk in maternity care, with speakers exploring the way risk is measured and used by care providers and the way pregnant women respond to assessments of risk they are given. Click here to view a video of his inaugural address, which is in English. Click here for a news article about Dr. De Vries, in Dutch.

Michael Poulin,PhD, has joined the faculty at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York (SUNY) as an AssistantProfessor of Psychology. Dr. Poulin was a post-doctoral fellow at CBSSM for twoyears, under the mentorship of StephanieBrown, PhD.  During this time he was anactive member of the CBSSM research community and a delightful colleague. Dr. Poulin's research focuses on the effects of stress on health and well-being, especiallythe ways people cope with stressful events. He examines how people's beliefsabout the world, including religious beliefs and beliefs about thetrustworthiness of others, influence adjustment to stress.  

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