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PIHCD Working Group: Michael McKee

Wed, May 06, 2015, 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Michael McKee will be speaking about a grant proposal to help elucidate how stigmatization in health care affects the quality of health care and access to care among Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users and characterize their main sources.  Both preliminary and published data illustrate that Deaf ASL individuals report a repetitive pattern of negative experiences with health care providers and institutions.  Medical advancements and public health safety net systems have failed to achieve health equity for Deaf ASL users.

CBSSM Co-Director Raymond De Vries presented at the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues on Sept. 2 about how to insure that the public has a voice in creating bioethics policies.

The September 2nd Presidential Commission meeting in Washington, DC, including Dr. De Vries's talk on the topic of "Fostering and Measuring Success in Ethics and Deliberation", is now available to be viewed online.

Jeff Kullgren recently received a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to carry out a national survey to examine the extent to which consumers who are in high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) engage in behaviors that help them optimize value. The goal of the project is to inform policymakers, payers, health systems, providers and consumers about the frequency and perceived effects of value-promoting consumer behaviors in HDHPs. Visit this link to learn more!

CBSSM Seminar: Aaron Scherer, PhD

Wed, February 03, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Aaron Scherer, PhD


CBSSM Postdoctoral Fellow

The Language of Medicine

Is the way we talk about health and medicine simply expressive or does the language we use actually change how we perceive and respond to health risks and medical interventions? Aaron Scherer will discuss a number of studies that explore how metaphors, labels, and explanations may shape our health-related perceptions and behavior.

Funded by the Greenwall Foundation

Because health care institutions are increasingly reliant on philanthropic fundraising from grateful patients, it is essential to understand public and patient perspectives about the ethical considerations in this context, including privacy and confidentiality, patient vulnerability, and physicians' conflicts of obligations.  The research team will conduct a survey to illuminate where current practices may diverge from public expectations, to focus deliberation on where policy changes may be needed.

PI: Reshma Jagsi

 The University of Michigan's Center of Excellence in Cancer Communications Research has been renewed for another five years, through August 2013, by the National Institutes of Health. The purpose of the $8.8 million award is to develop an efficient, theory-driven model for generating health behavior interventions that is generalizable across health behaviors and sociodemographic populations. The UM Center for Health Communicaitons Research, under principal investigator Victor Strecher, MPH, PhD, coordinates the core of this Center of Excellence. Former CBSSM Director Peter A. Ubel, MD, and current CBSSM Co-director Angela Fagerlin, PhD, are leading Project 3, in which they will conduct Internet studies to test several movel ways of tailoring a prostate cancer decision aid, with the goal of identifying interventions that increase the perceived salience of patient preferences. After they have determined the best interventions, they will modify the current prostate cancer decision aid and then test it in men with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer. Co-investigators on Project 3 are John T. Wei, MD, and Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, at the University of Michigan and James Tulsky, MD, and Stewart Alexander, PhD, at Duke University.

Partners

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine is supported by the Dean's Office at University of Michigan Medical School, the Office of Clinical Affairs, and the Department of Internal Medicine.

CBSSM is a collaborating center of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy & Innovation (IHPI). IHPI works to enhance the health and well-being of local, national, and global populations through innovative, interdisciplinary health services research that effectively informs public and private efforts to optimize the quality, safety, equity, and affordability of healthcare services.

CBSSM has strong research ties with numerous other units at the University of Michigan, including the Department of Psychology, the School of Public Health, the School of Information, and the Survey Research Center at the Institute for Social Research.

Of particular interest to those in the field of genomics is the ELSI Personal Genomics group at the University of Michigan: Exploring the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Personal Genomics. 

In the broader realm of decision making, the Decision Consortium group at the University of Michigan is an excellent resource, offering weekly forums during the academic year. 

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, January 25, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Meredith Walton presents "Opting In or Opting Out: The Ethical Principles Underlying Two Methods of Organ Donation."

Abstract: Recent legislation in France adopting an opt-out system of organ donation has again brought the issue of presumed consent in organ donation to the forefront of ethical discussion.  Proponents of the legislation have used the idea of ‘normative consent’ to justify it, as well as the expected increase in donation rates. But those opposed have argued that it strips the individual of their autonomy and does not in fact increase donation rates.This presentation seeks to define opt-in and opt-out systems of organ donation, explore principles of autonomy and consent surrounding the issue and reflect on whether adopting an opt-out system will truly increase the rate of organ donation

Wed, February 01, 2017

Sarah Hawley and Reshma Jagsi are co-authors on two studies of the impact of doctor-patient communication on patients' perceptions of their breast cancer recurrence risk. They found that breast cancer patients commonly overestimate their risk of recurrence, which was a negative impact on their quality of life. The two studies were highlighted in a MHealth Lab Report. Brian Zikmund-Fisher was also co-author on one of these studies.

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, February 22, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Devan Stahl, Assistant Professor, Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences, Department of Pediatrics and Human Development Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy

Title –  Responding to Hopes for a Miracle

Abstract: How should clinicians respond to patient’s or family’s hope for a “miracle”? What if the family wants to continue aggressive care that clinicians believe is non-beneficial in the hopes that a miracle will occur? The presentation will frame the discussion of miracle language and offer practical guidance on working with patients and families who invoke miracle language during a patient’s hospital stay.

At the end of this presentation participants will be able to:

1. Classify and distinguish between the most common ways patients/families use miracle language
2. Describe the ethical tensions that emerge when families request that clinicians continue non-beneficial care in the hopes a miracle will occur
3. Identify a set of strategies for productively engaging with patients/families who expect miracles

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