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Megan Knaus, MPH

Research Associate

Megan joined CBSSM in 2014 and has worked on multiple grant funded research projects related to health communication, patient-provider decision making, and health interventions driven by behavioral economics. She currently works with Dr. Brian Zikmund-Fisher on a National Science Foundation grant testing infectious disease communication strategies.

Last Name: 
Knaus

This two-day conference took place on the UM campus and is presented by the University of Michigan Medical School.  It was also supported by the Office of the Vice President for Research; the Center for Ethics and Public Life; Rackham Distinguished Faculty Grant; Greenwall Foundation; and Institute for Social Policy and Understanding.  Click here for conference videos, course packets, and reference materials. 

Thu, December 08, 2011

The Risk Evaluation and Education for Alzheimer's disease Study (REVEAL) is a series of clinical trials taking place at U-M's School of Public Health, along with other sites including Harvard University, Howard University, and the University of Pennsylvania. An audio interview with Dr. J. Scott Roberts can be found in the press release.

Fri, September 05, 2014

Brian Zikmund-Fisher joined other public health experts to talk about the increasing number of outbreaks of diseases that had largely been eliminated by vaccinations generations ago. Many doctors attribute the rising cases of measles, mumps and whooping cough to parents skipping or delaying vaccinating their children.

Research Topics: 

Genomics, Health and Society

This special interest group is led by Dr. Scott Roberts who is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education at the School of Public Health as well as the Director and Co-Director of the Public Health Genetics Certificate Program and the Dual Degree Program in Public Health and Genetic Counseling, respectively. Research within this area examines the ethical, social and behavioral implications of advances in genomics. CBSSM serves as a crucial locus for facilitating collaborations across disciplines and units. In fact, several groups across campus have invited us to collaborate on the study of bioethical issues related to burgeoning genomics-related research; these partners include investigators at U-M’s Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Michigan Center for Translational Pathology, and the Division of Pediatric Genetics.

Topics of interest include the following:

 

Aisha Langford PhD, MPH

Alumni

Dr. Aisha Langford was a VA and CBSSM Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2013-2015. She received her PhD from the department of Health Behavior and Health Education at the University of Michigan School of Public Health in Ann Arbor. From 2007 -2013, she directed the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Community Outreach Program. Her research interests include chronic disease prevention and control, health communications, medical decision making, and clinical trial participation. Aisha is from the San Francisco Bay Area and earned her BA from the University of Virginia.

Last Name: 
Langford

CBSSM Seminar: Michele Gornick, PhD

Thu, January 15, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC 16-266C

Michele Gornick, PhD

VA HSRD Fellow & CBSSM Research Investigator

Title: The public’s preferences for the return of secondary findings identified through genome sequencing: Information and deliberation make a difference

Summary: Genomic sequencing is becoming a part of clinical practice. Existing studies are limited and conclude that people would like unrestricted access to all of their genetic information. However, we do not know the extent to which respondents in these studies took into account the complex scientific and ethical issues that attend genome sequencing. In order to address this gap, we organized a deliberative democracy (DD) session to educate members of the public on genome sequencing, to engage them in dialogue about the benefits and risks of the clinical implementation of this technology, and to elicit their informed perspectives about policies governing the return of secondary findings.

CBSSM Seminar: Jodyn Platt, MPH, PhD

Thu, October 08, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Jodyn Platt, MPH, PhD


Research Investigator
Department of Learning Health Sciences

Terms and Conditions for Trust in Learning Health Systems

The next generation of health information technology, organized as “learning health systems,” promises efficient, engineered solutions to the well-known and enduring maladies of the existing U.S. health infrastructure: escalating costs, poor health outcomes, ineffective use of technology, sluggish research pipelines, dangerous medical error rates, and failure to implement known clinical best practices. Learning health systems would capitalize on "big data" enterprises to accelerate the production and application of knowledge in health care. However, the sharing of health information required, both within and across institutions, greatly exceeds the public’s understanding.  These initiatives are riding a precarious edge as the gap between public expectations and the realities of institutional data sharing widens at an unprecedented rate.  This presentation considers the causes and consequences of trust and mistrust of health information systems, their data sharing practices, and their policy implications. 
 

 

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