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Tue, April 08, 2014

Reshma Jagsi’s study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology about financial decline in breast cancer survivors has been cited by various health media outlets, including Bio-Medicine, Health News Digest, and various other outlets. The study found that after receiving treatment, a quarter of breast cancer survivors were found to be worse off financially. 

Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2014 - 2016.

Mexican Americans (MAs) suffer more from stroke than non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). Ischemic stroke is more common in MAs and their neurologic, functional and cognitive outcomes after stroke are worse than in NHWs. The reasons for the disparity in post-stroke outcome are unclear. Pre-stroke function and initial stroke severity are similar between the two groups as are ischemic stroke sub-types. One potential explanation for the worse post-stroke neurologic, functional and cognitive outcome in MAs compared with NHWs is allocation and effectiveness of post-stroke rehabilitation. There is remarkably little data demonstrating whether rehabilitation is dosed differently for MAs compared with NHWs, and still less information about whether, for a given dose of rehabilitative services following stroke, there is differential benefit by ethnicity. The current application will utilize the existing population-based Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC, NSR0138916) project's infrastructure and strong community relations to develop and pilot a method to collect the necessary data to determine the role of rehabilitation in ethnic disparities in post-stroke outcomes. Previous studies have suggested that looking at overall time spent in rehabilitation does not predict post-stroke outcome. However, specific components of physical, occupational and speech therapy, a practice-based approach, has been shown to be associated with stroke outcomes, and these associations have been shown to vary by race. However, this practice-based approach has not been implemented in a population-based manner across the range of settings where stroke patients receive rehabilitation services, and no study has used this approach in an ethnically diverse population. Therefore, our plan is to build on previous work by developing and utilizing a practice-based design in our population-based stroke study. Specifically, we will 1) continue to build the needed relationships with rehabilitation service providers in the community;2) work with local rehabilitation therapists to refine data collection instruments as part of the practice-based design;3) pilot test data collection of specific rehabilitation components of post-stroke rehabilitation across all rehabilitation settings;and 4) analyze this data to determine the feasibility of this approach for a larger study and to provide preliminary data on differences in access and effectiveness by ethnicity. In total, our infrastructure development, refinement of tools to measure specific therapy modalities and pilot testing will position us perfectly to submit an R01 application to identify ethnic differences in access to rehabilitation and specific rehabilitation services associated with improved functional outcome in MAs and NHWs.

PI(s): Lynda Lisabeth, Lewis Morgenstern

Kathryn Moseley served as one of the judges at "The Big Ethical Question Slam 5" hosted by a2ethics.org. In addition, Naomi Laventhal, Michele Gornick, Christian Vercler, Lauren Smith, and Lauren Wancata served as judges at the "Michigan Highschool Ethics Bowl 2."

Thanks to all the CBSSM folks who contributed their time!

For more information about these events and other great ethics-related activites, go to a2ethics.org.

A short video about the Highschool Ethics Bowl can be found here.

Bioethics Grand Rounds: Musical Event "When Death Comes Callin"

Wed, October 26, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

When Death Comes Callin': Songs and Reflections About Death

Charlotte DeVries, Jeanne Mackey, Merilynne Rush, and friends offer a program of songs and brief readings reflecting various perspectives on death - humorous, sad, thoughtful, and quirky.

Lunch is provided on a first-come, first-served basis.

Angela Fagerlin was listed as one of the top 1% of most-cited researchers worldwide.

More than 3,200 researchers worldwide were included in the Thompson Reuters list, which ranks an individual’s impact based on a survey of Highly Cited Papers (defined as being in the top 1 percent by citations in the Web of Science database) between 2002-2012.

The University of Michigan ranks No. 11 in a new list of most-cited researchers produced by Thompson Reuters, with 27 U-M scientists determined by the company to be in the top 1 percent of their fields.

Link: http://research.umich.edu/blog/2014/07/31/u-m-ranks-no-11-in-new-list-of-most-cited-researchers/

Link: https://www.umhsheadlines.org/2014/08/angela-fagerlin-ph-d-listed-as-one-of-the-top-1-of-most-cited-researchers-worldwide/

 

With some support from CBSSM, Dr. Stephanie Kukora was able to complete a Certificate Program in Pediatric Bioethics from the Children’s Mercy Center for Pediatric Bioethics. Her reasearch focused on decision-making and bioethical issues in the newborn intensive care unit. Congratulations Dr. Kukora!

The Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM), Council has selected Jeffrey Kullgren to receive the Milton W. Hamolsky - Junior Faculty Award for his abstract entitled “Financial Incentives for Completion of Fecal Occult Blood Tests among Veterans: A 2-Stage Pragmatic Cluster Randomized, Controlled Trial”. This abstract was rated as one of the top three abstracts presented by junior faculty at the Society’s April 2014 meeting.

Michael Poulin,PhD, has joined the faculty at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York (SUNY) as an AssistantProfessor of Psychology. Dr. Poulin was a post-doctoral fellow at CBSSM for twoyears, under the mentorship of StephanieBrown, PhD.  During this time he was anactive member of the CBSSM research community and a delightful colleague. Dr. Poulin's research focuses on the effects of stress on health and well-being, especiallythe ways people cope with stressful events. He examines how people's beliefsabout the world, including religious beliefs and beliefs about thetrustworthiness of others, influence adjustment to stress.  

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, a CBSSM investigator and Director of the CBSSM Internet Survey lab, is the principal investigator on an Investigator Initiated Research award from the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making that began in October 2008.  The grant, entitled "Learning by Doing: Improving Risk Communication Through Active Processing of Interactive Pictographs," will fund the development and testing of of Flash-based interactive risk graphics that research participants or patients can use to visually demonstrate how likely they believe some event is to occur. Dr. Zikmund-Fisher hopes that people who create risk graphics themselves will have a better intuitive understanding of risk than people who just view static images. Co-investigators on the award include Angela Fagerlin, Peter A. Ubel, and Amanda Dillard.

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