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Beth Tarini and Scott Roberts spoke at the Michigan State Medical Society’s 17th Annual Conference on Bioethics, "Putting the Me in Medicine: The Ethics of Personalized Medical Care"

For more information on the conference, you can visit its website here.

Previous and current CBSSM faculty were all smiles when they were reunited at the The 35th Annual Meeting of the Society for Medical Decision Making, last Saturday, Oct. 19th. 

Masahito Jimbo, MD, PhD, MPH

Faculty

Masahito Jimbo is Professor of Family Medicine and Urology at the University of Michigan. Having worked as a family physician in both urban (Philadelphia) and rural (North Carolina) underserved areas, he has first-hand knowledge and experience of the challenges faced by clinicians and healthcare institutions to be successful in providing patient care that is personal, comprehensive, efficient and timely. Initially trained in basic laboratory research, having obtained his MD and PhD degrees at Keio University in Tokyo, Japan, Dr.

Last Name: 
Jimbo

Raymond De Vries is co-author on a new publication in Academic Medicine, highlighting a successful model for collaboration which was developed in the early phases of a grant funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation nearly five years ago. The Collaborative Health Alliance for Reshaping Training, Education, and Research (CHARTER) project expanded the partnerships between the University of Michigan and several Ghanaian academic institutions to enhance health care provider education and build and/or increase research capacity. One of the early goals of the grant was to establish guiding principles for engagement through a Charter of Collaboration.


Read more about the partnership through UMHS News and the origional PubMed article.

Lauren Smith, Robert Silbergleit, Sacha Montas and colleagues fielded a great team in this year’s Big Ethical Question Slam. The Ethics slam is an annual community event hosted by A2Ethics.org.

Ed Goldman was awarded a Rackham Michigan Meetings grant to put on a three-day conference on international aspects of reproductive justice, scheduled for May 29 - June 1, 2013.  The conference will ask how academia can set its research agenda to help further the goals of advocacy groups, focusing on ways to transmit medically accurate facts to various decision-makers (legislators, governments, etc.).

Carl Schneider, JD

Faculty

Carl E. Schneider is the Chauncey Stillman Professor for Ethics, Morality, and the Practice of Law and is a Professor of Internal Medicine. He was educated at Harvard College and the University of Michigan Law School, where he was editor in chief of the Michigan Law Review. He served as law clerk to Judge Carl McGowan of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and to Justice Potter Stewart of the United States Supreme Court. He became a member of the Law School faculty in 1981 and of the Medical School faculty in 1998. 

Last Name: 
Schneider

Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2013-2018

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects 20 million Americans. CKD can lead to end stage renal disease and is associated with morbidity and mortality at all stages. Early management decreases complications and may ameliorate disease progression, but is often reliant on patient self-care. Research suggests that a large proportion of patients lack fundamental knowledge about kidney disease, its implications, and self-care necessary to attenuate CKD progression to end stages. Patient decision aids are designed to facilitate disease communication, increase patient knowledge, clarify patients'values and engage patients in care. There have been no studies using patient decision aids in pre-dialysis CKD. Moreover, there is a paucity of data available to guide development of CKD patient decision aids for use in practice. The primary goal of this research proposal is to elicit stakeholder (i.e. patient and provider) input on information needs and preferences for developing a CKD decision aid that will 1) support patient-centered CKD communication, 2) facilitate shared learning and decision making between patients and providers, and 3) optimize patient engagement in care. To accomplish this objective, I propose to conduct three inter-related but independent studies. First, I will determine information needs and factors that influence self-care in patients with pre-dialysis CKD using structured interviews and a survey in 250 patients seen in the University of Michigan nephrology outpatient clinics. Second, I will identify physician perspectives about what they need to support patient CKD education and to effectively engage patients in care by conducting structured interviews of fifty physicians (25 primary care, 25 nephrology) who practice in the University of Michigan Ambulatory Clinics. The interviews and survey questions in the first two aims will be grounded on two quality improvement methods namely, cause/effect analysis and quality function deployment. Informed by the first two aims, I will develop and test a patient- centered decision aid, designed to facilitate patient-physician communication and support patient decision making and self-care in pre-dialysis kidney disease. The aid will be tested in a randomized trial with the decision aid the exposure, and intermediate patient modifiable characteristics (knowledge, self-efficacy, and treatment decisional conflict), as co-primary outcomes. The proposed research is likely to improve our understanding about the needs and preferences of key stakeholders involved in CKD communication and care, and provide insight into the effectiveness of patient-centered education interventions on outcomes in pre- dialysis kidney disease.

PI(s): Julie Wright, Angela Fagerlin

Co-I(s): Eve Kerr, Akinlolu Ojo

Wed, February 03, 2016

Beth Tarini, MD, MS and colleagues are back in the news regarding their 2013 article in Pediatrics entitled, “Blindness in Walnut Grove: How Did Mary Ingalls Lose Her Sight?” Their article was cited in CNNCBS NewsNew York TimesAnnarbor.com and many others. 

Citation: Allexan SS,  Byington CL, Finkelstein JI, Tarini  BA (2013 ). "Blindness in Walnut Grove: How Did Mary Ingalls Lose Her Sight?" Pediatrics; DOI: 10.1542/peds.2012-1438 [Epub ahead of print]

Research Topics: 
Thu, July 18, 2013

Congratulations to Susan Dorr Goold on her election to Chair of the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs!

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