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Masahito Jimbo, MD, PhD, MPH

Faculty

Masahito Jimbo is Professor of Family Medicine and Urology at the University of Michigan. Having worked as a family physician in both urban (Philadelphia) and rural (North Carolina) underserved areas, he has first-hand knowledge and experience of the challenges faced by clinicians and healthcare institutions to be successful in providing patient care that is personal, comprehensive, efficient and timely. Initially trained in basic laboratory research, having obtained his MD and PhD degrees at Keio University in Tokyo, Japan, Dr.

Last Name: 
Jimbo

Jeff Kullgren's editorial "Injecting Facts Into the Heated Debates Over Medicaid Expansion" was recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. In this editorial, Dr. Kullgren reviews Wherry and Miller's study on the effects of ACA on coverage, access, utilization, and health. 

Wherry LR, Miller S. Early coverage, access, utilization, and health effects associated with the Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansions. A quasi-experimental study. Ann Intern Med 2016

Link to IHPI article.

Carl Schneider, JD

Faculty

Carl E. Schneider is the Chauncey Stillman Professor for Ethics, Morality, and the Practice of Law and is a Professor of Internal Medicine. He was educated at Harvard College and the University of Michigan Law School, where he was editor in chief of the Michigan Law Review. He served as law clerk to Judge Carl McGowan of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and to Justice Potter Stewart of the United States Supreme Court. He became a member of the Law School faculty in 1981 and of the Medical School faculty in 1998. 

Last Name: 
Schneider

Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2013 - 2015.

With the aging of society and restructuring of families, it is increasingly important to understand how individuals become disabled. New disability is associated with increased mortality, substantial increases in medical costs (often borne by public payers), and a heavy burden on families and caregivers. While the disablement process?as theorized by Verburgge & Jette and their successors?has traditionally been seen as chronic and gradual, there is increasing recognition that acute events play a critical role in disability. Medical illnesses are not the only potentially disabling events. NIA & NINR recently posted PA-11-265, calling for ?Social and Behavioral Research on the Elderly in Disasters? in recognition that natural disasters are common, but we know little about their impact on health and disability. The National Research Council?s Committee on Population published a report in 2009 documenting not only our ignorance in this area, but, importantly, the potential value of studying disasters to understand fundamental processes in disability and health.
Our long-term research agenda is (a) to test the hypothesis that natural disasters cause enduring morbidity for survivors that is not fully addressed by existing health and welfare programs, and (b) to discover remediable mechanisms that generate that enduring morbidity. Here we propose a nationwide test of the association of living in a disaster area with individuals? long-term disability and health care use. To perform this test, we will combine the unique longitudinal resources of over 16,000 respondents in the linked Health and Retirement Study (HRS) / Medicare files with a newly constructed mapping of all FEMA disaster declarations between 1998 and 2012. We will address key gaps in the existing literature of detailed single-disaster studies with a generalizable perspective across time and space via these Specific Aims:
AIM 1: Quantify the association between the extent of a disaster ? measured as the repair cost to public infrastructure and increases in level of disability among survivors. We will follow respondents for an average of 5 years after the disaster. AIM 2: Quantify the association between the extent of a disaster and increases in the likelihood of hospitalization among survivors. AIM 3: Test the hypothesis that increases in level of disability and likelihood of hospitalization after disasters are worse for those living in counties with higher levels of poverty.
This proposal is specifically responsive to PA-11-265. This proposal is innovative because long-term effects of disasters, particularly for vulnerable older Americans, have been systematically neglected in previous research. It is significant because it will address the public health consequences of a relatively common but understudied exposure. Further, a key contribution of this R21 will be to evaluate the feasibility of the National Research Council conjecture that natural disasters can be studied as exogenous shocks to the environment, and that we can thereby test and elaborate usually endogenous mechanisms in the development of disability.

PI(s): Theodore Iwashyna

Co-I(s): Kenneth Langa, Yun Li, Anne Sales

Thu, July 18, 2013

Congratulations to Susan Dorr Goold on her election to Chair of the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs!

Wed, February 03, 2016

Beth Tarini, MD, MS and colleagues are back in the news regarding their 2013 article in Pediatrics entitled, “Blindness in Walnut Grove: How Did Mary Ingalls Lose Her Sight?” Their article was cited in CNNCBS NewsNew York TimesAnnarbor.com and many others. 

Citation: Allexan SS,  Byington CL, Finkelstein JI, Tarini  BA (2013 ). "Blindness in Walnut Grove: How Did Mary Ingalls Lose Her Sight?" Pediatrics; DOI: 10.1542/peds.2012-1438 [Epub ahead of print]

Research Topics: 

Scott Kim, MD, PhD

Alumni

Scott Kim, MD, PhD, is a Senior Investigator in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health and Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan. Dr. Kim studies research ethics, especially the ethics of involving decisionally impaired persons in research, the ethics of high-risk research, and methodological issues in empirical bioethics research. He is also interested in the interface of conceptual and empirical methods of bioethics scholarship.  Prior to joining the NIH, Dr.

Last Name: 
Kim

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) Research Colloquium will be held Wednesday, April 17, 2013 at the Founders Room of the Alumni Center, 200 Fletcher Street, Ann Arbor, MI.

Click here to register for the Colloquium!

Click here for the Colloquium Schedule and Presentation Abstracts.

More details about the CBSSM Research Colloquium and Bishop Lecture can be found at the Events page.

 

 

Researchpalooza

Wed, August 27, 2014, 11:00am to 2:00pm
Location: 
Circle Drive in front of Med Sci I

 

This will be the first year that CBSSM will be participating in Researchpalooza. Please come and enjoy the fun!

 

Wednesday, August 27, 2014
11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Circle Drive in front of Med Sci I

 

All UMHS employees from the Hospitals and Health Centers and Medical School are invited to celebrate this annual event.

Stop by the University Hospital Courtyard and Medical School Circle Drive for:

  • Ice Cream sundaes and sugar-free alternatives
  • Karaoke and musical entertainment
  • Festival Games
  • Department and vendor tables with information and giveaways

 

For more info: http://medicine.umich.edu/medschool/research/office-research/research-news-events/researchpalooza

Kathryn Moseley served as one of the judges at "The Big Ethical Question Slam 5" hosted by a2ethics.org. In addition, Naomi Laventhal, Michele Gornick, Christian Vercler, Lauren Smith, and Lauren Wancata served as judges at the "Michigan Highschool Ethics Bowl 2."

Thanks to all the CBSSM folks who contributed their time!

For more information about these events and other great ethics-related activites, go to a2ethics.org.

A short video about the Highschool Ethics Bowl can be found here.

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