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Joel Howell, MD, PhD

Faculty

Joel D. Howell is a Professor at the University of Michigan in the departments of Internal Medicine (Medical School), Health Management and Policy (School of Public Health), and History (College of Literature, Science, and the Arts), as well as the Victor C. Vaughan Professor of the History of Medicine. He received his M.D. at the University of Chicago, and stayed at that institution for his internship and residency in internal medicine. At the University of Pennsylvania, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar, and received his Ph.D. in the History and Sociology of Science.

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Howell

Registration is now open for the April 25, 2017 CBSSM Research Colloquium & Bishop Lecture in Bioethics. This event is free and open to the public. Registration is encouraged, as it will help us to estimate numbers for catering and lunch. Please RSVP by April 18th.

The keynote address is the Bishop Lecture in Bioethics, an endowed lectureship made possible by a gift from the estate of Ronald C. and Nancy V. Bishop.  Norman Daniels, PhD will present the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled: “Universal Access vs Universal Coverage: Two models of what we should aim for."

Norman Daniels, PhD is Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Location: Great Lakes Room, Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
 
Click here to register for the Colloquium!

Click here for the Colloquium Schedule and Presentation Abstracts.

PIHCD Meeting: Tom Valley

Thu, June 25, 2015, 11:00pm
Location: 
B003E

Next Thursday, June 25th, Dr. Tom Valley will be presenting his survey on “Assessing Financial Stress associated with Critical Illness”. Note there is a time change - the meeting will be taking place from 11 am - 12 pm. The location is still NCRC Building 16-B003E (basement).

ASCO Connection recently highlighted Reshma Jagsi. Click here for the full article.

Research Topics: 

Oxford University Press has published Evaluation of Capacity to Consent to Treatment and Research, by CBSSM's Co-director Scott Kim, MD, PhD. The book is part of the series Best Practices in Forensic Mental Health Assessment. For further information about this volume, click here.

Thu, April 04, 2013

Babies cry and spit up … and too often those common symptoms are labeled as disease, according to a new study conducted by U-M researchers. Frequent use of the GERD label can lead to overuse of medication. The study was published online today in the journal Pediatrics.

Stories have already been published by Reuters,  Yahoo News!MedPage TodayNPRMSN Healthy Living,  CBS News, and the Chicago Tribune, among others. Laura Scherer, PHD, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, Angela Fagerlin, PhD and Beth Tarini, MD are authors on this study.

Mon, June 23, 2014

Brian Zikmund-Fisher was interviewed by Reuters Health for the article "Shared decision making still lacking for cancer screening." He discusses his research and trade-offs in cancer screenings. "What this study does is it shows that despite all of the initiatives and the discussion of shared decision making that has been going on, we don't seem to be moving the needle very much," he states. 

His interview also received press in the Chicago Tribune and New York Daily News.

Conference on Bioethics: First Do No Harm: Avoiding Overdiagnosis and Overtreatment in Medicine

Sat, November 11, 2017, 8:45am
Location: 
Sheraton Ann Arbor Hotel | 3200 Boardwalk Street | Ann Arbor, MI

Registration available here.
 
8:45 am
Welcome, Opening Remarks, and Presentation of Certification of Appreciation Award to Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation
Lauren B. Smith, MD, Chair, MSMS Committee on Bioethics; Department of Pathology, University of Michigan
Audrey J. Harvey, CEO, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation; and,
Shauna Ryder-Diggs, MD, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation
 
9:00 - 10:00 am
7 Assumptions that Drive Too Much Medical Care
H. Gilbert Welch, MD, MPH, Professor of Medicine, Community & Family Medicine, The Dartmouth Institute, The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Adjunct Professor, Business Administration, Tuck School
of Business and Adjunct Professor, Public Policy, Dartmouth College
 
10:00 - 11:00 am
Responding to those who Hope for a Miracle
Devan Stahl, PhD, Assistant Professor, Center for Ethics & Humanities in the Life Sciences, Department of Pediatrics & Human Development, Michigan State University
 
11:15 am - 12:15 pm
Whose Decision is it Anyway? Code Status and the Unilateral DNAR
Adam Marks, MD, Associate Director of the Adult Palliative and Supportive Care Clinic, East Ann Arbor Health and Geriatrics Center, Adult Palliative Care Medical Director, Arbor Hospice
 
1:15 - 2:15 pm
Capacity for Preferences: An Overlooked Factor in Ethical Dilemmas with Incapacitated Patients
Jason A. Wasserman, PhD, Associate Professor, Biomedical Science, Faculty Advisor on Professionalism, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine; and,
Mark C. Navin, PhD, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
 
2:15 - 3:15 pm
Over-treatment/Over-diagnosis of Genetic Testing
Michele Gornick, PhD, MA, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School
 
3:30 - 4:30 pm
Case Studies
 
4:30 pm
Closing Remarks
Lauren B. Smith, MD, University of Michigan

2017 Bishop Lecture featuring Norman Daniels, PhD

Tue, April 25, 2017, 11:15am
Location: 
Great Lakes Room, Palmer Commons, 100 Washtenaw Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

The 2017 Bishop Lecture in Bioethics was presented by Norman Daniels, PhD, Mary B Saltonstall Professor and Professor of Ethics and Population Health in the Department of Global Health and Population at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Daniels presented a talk entitled, "Universal Access vs. Universal Coverage: Two models of what we should aim for." The Bishop Lecture served as the keynote address during the CBSSM Research Colloquium.

Abstract: We contrast two models of health care insurance, the Universal Coverage model underlying the Affordable Care Act and the Universal Access model underlying the (now withdrawn) American Health Care Act. Our goal is to evaluate the strongest argument for the Universal Access model. That model suggests that if people have real choices about health care insurance, some will buy it and some will not, and no one should be mandated to buy it. We argue that the Universal Access model presupposes that people can afford insurance, and that means subsidizing it for millions of people as the Universal Coverage model underlying the ACA does. These costs aside, the strongest argument for the Universal Access model is that giving people true choice may make the population level of well-being higher. Some people will have other priorities that they prefer to pursue, especially if they can free ride by enjoying the benefits of a system that provides health care without their contributing to it. If the additional costs that third parties have to pay as a result of the increase in real choice are significant, then the strongest argument for Universal access fails: the benefits of choosing not to be insured are outweighed by the imposed costs on others from these choices.

Norman Daniels, PhD is Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health. Formerly chair of the Philosophy Department at Tufts University, his most recent books include Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly (Cambridge, 2008); Setting Limits Fairly: Learning to Share Resources for Health, 2nd edition, (Oxford, 2008); From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice (2000); Is Inequality Bad for Our Health? (2000); and Identified versus Statistical Lives (Oxford 2015). He has published 200 peer-reviewed articles and as many book chapters, editorials, and book reviews. His research is on justice and health policy, including priority setting in health systems, fairness and health systems reform, health inequalities, and intergenerational justice. A member of the IOM, a Fellow of the Hastings Center, and formerly on the ethics advisory boards of the CDC and the CIHR, he directs the Ethics concentration of the Health Policy PhD at Harvard and recently won the Everett Mendelsohn Award for mentoring graduate students.

  • Click here for the video recording of the 2017 Bishop Lecture.

Sat, March 03, 2018

Reshma Jagsi's work was recently highlighted in Emergency Medicine News: "Special Report: Sexual Harassment a Muddle of Fear, Guilt, and Shame."

Research Topics: 

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