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Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil

Director

Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, is Professor, Deputy Chair, and Residency Program Director in the Department of Radiation Oncology and Director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan.

She graduated first in her class from Harvard College and then pursued her medical training at Harvard Medical School. She also served as a fellow in the Center for Ethics at Harvard University and completed her doctorate in Social Policy at Oxford University as a Marshall Scholar.

Last Name: 
Jagsi
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Bioethics Grand Rounds -Scott Grant MD, MBE

Wed, May 24, 2017, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Auditorium

Scott Grant, MD, MBE, University of Chicago: "Dealing with complications and poor outcomes and surgical futility"

Scott Grant, MD, MBE, University of Chicago

Abstract: Surgical complications are ubiquitous and effect all surgeons. This talk will review how surgical ethics is distinct from traditional medical ethics in that surgeons have a greater and more direct responsibility for the outcomes of their patients than medical doctors. It will review how surgery harms before healing and the importance of weighing risks and benefits in decision making. Ways of assessing perioperative risk and preventing complications will be reviewed. Strategies for coping with complications will be described. Human error theory and the "Swiss cheese" model of human error will briefly be discussed. The SPIKES protocol for breaking bad news will be reviewed. Different definitions of futility will be described. Various procedural approaches to futility disputes will be analyzed. The best tool in approaching challenging "futility" situations will be described - open and honest communication between the patient or surrogate and the physician.

Raymond De Vries, PhD

Associate Director

Raymond De Vries PhD is Associate Director at the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan and is a Professor in the Department of Learning Health Sciences and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He is also visiting professor at CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, University of Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Last Name: 
De Vries

Moral concerns and the willingness to donate to a research biobank (Jun-16)

Imagine you just had a medical test or treatment. You are asked to donate your leftover tissue to a biobank.

Biobanks store donated samples, like blood, urine, skin, or tumor cells. Researchers can ask the biobank if they can use some of the samples to do their studies.  These samples may help researchers to find better ways of preventing or treating disease.

You are asked to sign a “blanket consent” form. This means that the biobank can use your sample in any study done by researchers who use the biobank.

The biobank cannot predict what kind of studies will be done in the future.  However, a committee must review each study to make sure the study is well designed, protects your privacy, and will help society.

Liver Transplant Organ Quality Decision Aid: Would you consider a less than perfect liver? (Jan-16)

Imagine that you are a patient with end-stage liver disease and you are currently on the liver transplant waiting list.

Available donor livers are limited and vary in quality. Donor characteristics such as age and cause of death can make a difference between a 20% and a 40% rate of liver transplant (graft) failure by 3-years post-transplant.

Now imagine that you and your doctor are discussing the risks and benefits of a liver transplant and whether you might consider a “less than perfect” liver (with a higher risk for graft failure).  To help you in your decision making, you are provided with a decision aid to help you to consider the level of risk you would be willing to accept from a donated liver.

On the following page, consider an image representing your (pretend!) risk of dying or becoming too sick for a liver transplant within the next 3-months if you don’t get a transplant.

Attitudes toward Return of Secondary Results in Genomic Sequencing (Sep-16)

Imagine you are at the doctor’s office because you (or your child) have a serious health condition like heart disease or cancer. To help find out whether any treatment options exist, your doctor suggests that you (or your child) have your genome sequenced.

Genome sequencing may provide information about your (or your child’s) current health condition. However, the genome sequencing could reveal additional and unexpected results not related to the current condition. The doctor wants to know what types of these secondary results you would want to be told.

Naomi Laventhal, MD, MA

Faculty

Dr. Naomi T. Laventhal joined the University of Michigan in August 2009, after completing her residency in pediatrics, fellowships in neonatology and clinical medical ethics, and a master’s degree in public policy at the University of Chicago. She is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases in the Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, and in the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM).

Last Name: 
Laventhal

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