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Sun, November 14, 2010

Raymond De Vries, Professor in the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine and the Departments of Medical Education and Obstetrics and Gynecology, authored a commentary in a Dutch national newspaper examining media misrepresentation of a recent article in the British Medical Journal about perinatal death in the Netherlands.  Dr. De Vries and colleague Lisa Kane Low, Director of Midwifery Education, will present at a conference, Knowledge in Business, sponsored by the Zuyd University in Maastricht.

Along with Ted A. Skolarus, M.D., M.P.H., CBSSM Co-Director, Angela Fagerlin authored a Viewpoint article titled "Rethinking Patient-Physician Communication of Biopsy Results -- The Waiting Game." In the article, they conclude, "Telemedicine approaches can potentially relieve much of the anxiety associated with in-person consultations while delivering bad news in a timely, compassionate, and patient-centered manner."

CBSSM Faculty, Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Tanner Caverly, and Jeffrey Kullgren were co-authors on a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine Article on Why Doctors Order Unnecessary Scans for Back Pain. Erika Sears, MD, MS was the lead author.

The study was highlighted in UMHS news release here.

Research Topics: 

Lisa Szymecko, JD, PhD


Lisa Szymecko joined CBSSM in May 2012 as a Research Area Specialist Intermediate, working as the study coordinator for Susan Goold on the DECIDERS and PCORI projects.

Lisa earned her Bachelors of Science degree in Chemical Engineering from Michigan Technological University, her Juris Doctorate from Detroit College of Law, and her PhD in Resource Development from Michigan State University.

Last Name: 

Please visit the events page of the CBSSM website to view the video of the February 1, 2012, talk and panel discussion, "Ethical Imperialism: The Case Against IRB Review of the Social Sciences," featuring Dr. Zachary Schrag of George Mason University; Dr. Cleo Caldwell of U-M's School of Public Health; Dr. Alford Young, Jr., of U-M's College of Literature, Science, & Arts; and Carl Schneider of U-M's Law School.

Kathryn Moseley served as one of the judges at "The Big Ethical Question Slam 5" hosted by In addition, Naomi Laventhal, Michele Gornick, Christian Vercler, Lauren Smith, and Lauren Wancata served as judges at the "Michigan Highschool Ethics Bowl 2."

Thanks to all the CBSSM folks who contributed their time!

For more information about these events and other great ethics-related activites, go to

A short video about the Highschool Ethics Bowl can be found here.

Funded by National Science Foundation.

Funding Years: 2013-2016

The goal of this supplemental proposal is to conduct preproduction activities that will allow the successful and efficient collection of the PSID data in 2013. Specifically, the aims are to 1) conduct scientific review and development of the 2013 instrument, 2) program and test the new instrument, including the fielding of a pretest, 3) develop respondent contact materials, including a contact information update request, and other pre-interview informational materials, 4) conduct an interviewer training for the 2013 field effort, including the development of training materials and content that will lead to interviewer certification.

PI(s): Charles Brown

Co-I(s): Mick Couper, Katherine McGonagle


Moral concerns and the willingness to donate to a research biobank (Jun-16)

Imagine you just had a medical test or treatment. You are asked to donate your leftover tissue to a biobank.

Biobanks store donated samples, like blood, urine, skin, or tumor cells. Researchers can ask the biobank if they can use some of the samples to do their studies.  These samples may help researchers to find better ways of preventing or treating disease.

You are asked to sign a “blanket consent” form. This means that the biobank can use your sample in any study done by researchers who use the biobank.

The biobank cannot predict what kind of studies will be done in the future.  However, a committee must review each study to make sure the study is well designed, protects your privacy, and will help society.

Liver Transplant Organ Quality Decision Aid: Would you consider a less than perfect liver? (Jan-16)

Imagine that you are a patient with end-stage liver disease and you are currently on the liver transplant waiting list.

Available donor livers are limited and vary in quality. Donor characteristics such as age and cause of death can make a difference between a 20% and a 40% rate of liver transplant (graft) failure by 3-years post-transplant.

Now imagine that you and your doctor are discussing the risks and benefits of a liver transplant and whether you might consider a “less than perfect” liver (with a higher risk for graft failure).  To help you in your decision making, you are provided with a decision aid to help you to consider the level of risk you would be willing to accept from a donated liver.

On the following page, consider an image representing your (pretend!) risk of dying or becoming too sick for a liver transplant within the next 3-months if you don’t get a transplant.

Attitudes toward Return of Secondary Results in Genomic Sequencing (Sep-16)

Imagine you are at the doctor’s office because you (or your child) have a serious health condition like heart disease or cancer. To help find out whether any treatment options exist, your doctor suggests that you (or your child) have your genome sequenced.

Genome sequencing may provide information about your (or your child’s) current health condition. However, the genome sequencing could reveal additional and unexpected results not related to the current condition. The doctor wants to know what types of these secondary results you would want to be told.