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Investigator(s)

Conference

Title of Talk/Poster

Ray De Vries

Lisa Harris

et al.

American Society for Bioethics & Humanities (ASBH)

Annual Meeting

 

“Mundane Reproductive Ethics: Beyond the Sensational Lie"

 

"Everyday Ethical Problems in Abortion, In Vitro Fertilization, Pregnancy Planning, and Birth"

 

Ray De Vries

Susan Goold

et al.

American Society for Bioethics & Humanities (ASBH)

Annual Meeting

 

“Learning about Learning from the Public: A Workshop about Methods of Public Engagement on Ethical Issues in Biomedical Research, Health, and Health Care"

 

Angela Fagerlin

et al.

Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) Annual Meeting

 

“Minority Cancer Survivors' Perceptions and Experience with Cancer Clinical Trials Participation"

Angela Fagerlin

Andrea Fuhrel-Forbis

Sarah Hawley

Holly Witteman

et al.

 

Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) Annual Meeting

“Preferences for Breast Cancer Chemoprevention"

Angela Fagerlin

Andrea Fuhrel-Forbis

Brian Zikmund-Fisher

et al.

Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) Annual Meeting

 

“Informed Decision Making About Breast Cancer Chemoprevention: RCT of an Online Decision Aid Intervention"

Angela Fagerlin

Valerie Kahn

et al.

Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) Annual Meeting

 

“Literacy and Numeracy in Veterans and Their Impact on Cancer Treatment Perceptions and Anxiety"

Angela Fagerlin

Laura Scherer

et al.

Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) Annual Meeting

 

“Anxiety as an Impetus for Action: On the Relative Influence of Breast Cancer Risk and Breast Cancer Anxiety on Chemoprevention Decisions"

Angela Fagerlin

Laura Scherer

et al.

Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) Annual Meeting

 

“Literacy and Irrational Decisions: Bias From Beliefs, Not From Comprehension"

Angela Fagerlin

Holly Witteman

Brian Zikmund-Fisher

et al.

Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) Annual Meeting

 

“Integers Are Better: Adding Decimals to Risk Estimates Makes Them Less Believable and Harder to Remember"

Andrea Fuhrel-Forbis

Holly Witteman

Brian Zikmund-Fisher

et al.

Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) Annual Meeting

 

“Avatars and Animation of Risk Graphics Help People Better Understand Their Risk of Cardiovascular Disease"

Holly Witteman

Brian Zikmund-Fisher

et al.

Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) Annual Meeting

 

 

“If I'm Not High Risk, Then That's Not My Risk: Tailoring Estimates for Low-risk Patients May Undermine Perceived Relevance"

 

Brian Zikmund-Fisher

et al.

Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM) Annual Meeting

“The Effect of Narrative Content and Emotional Valence on Decision About Treatments for Early Stage Breast Cancer"

 

Tue, December 11, 2018

New JAMA Network Open article, "Patient Attitudes Toward Individualized Recommendations to Stop Low-Value Colorectal Cancer Screening" assesses veterans’ attitudes toward and comfort with cessation of low-value CRC screening. This survey study finds that nearly 1/3 of respondents are uncomfortable with discontinuing screening even when the benefit is low and nearly 1/2 thought age should not be used to decide to stop screening. CBSSM's Brian Zikmund-Fisher is a co-author on the study.

Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, is the featured guest editor for a special supplement to Medical Decision Making's September/October 2010 issue, highlighting the DECISIONS study, a nationwide survey of adults in the US regarding common medical decisions.  Lead author on the main paper of the supplement, Zikmund-Fisher and co-authors (including CBSSM faculty Angela Fagerlin, PhD and Mick Couper, PhD) describe the DECISIONS study, a telephone interview of a nationally representative sample of 3010 adults age 40 and over faced with making a medical decision in the past two years.  Researchers defined medical decisions as the patient having initiated medications, been screened, or had surgery within the past 2 years or having discussed these actions with a health care provider during the same interval.  Key findings from the study:

Although patients frequently receive information about the benefits of a procedure or medication, they don't always learn about the disadvantages.

Healthcare providers don't always ask patients what they want to do.

Most patients don't use the Internet to help them make common medical decisions; healthcare professionals remain the most important source of information.

Patients often don't know as much as they think they do.  Many patients feel well informed even when they don't know key facts that would help them make a better decision.

African-Americans and Hispanics were less knowledgeable than other patients about medications to treat high cholesterol.  In addition, they were more likely to say their doctor made decisions about cholesterol medications for them.

Most patients think they are more likely to get cancer than they really are, and tend to view cancer screenings as more accurate than they are.

Men and women think about cancer risks differently.  Women are more active participants in cancer screening decisions regardless of their perception of risk, whereas men tended to get involved only if they felt at higher risk.

Training & Mentoring

A key goal of CBSSM is training the next generation of interdisciplinary researchers. CBSSM has an active mentoring and training program through our Postdoctoral Research Fellow Program, led by Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD.

CBSSM offers support to junior investigators and our affiliated faculty have actively mentored Postdoctoral Fellows from the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program and the Veteran’s Administration.

In addition, CBSSM affiliated faculty mentor undergraduate students and Research Assistants who go on to pursue advanced degrees, as well as medical students. CBSSM actively participates in the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) at the University of Michigan.  

 

Mick Couper, PhD, and Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, have received additional funding from the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making for continuing analysis of their groundbreaking National Surveyof Medical Decisions. This telephone survey of 3,010 English-speaking adultsover the age of 40 targeted decisions related to nine issues: hypertensionmedication, hypercholesterolemia medication, depression medication, colorectal cancer screening, breast cancer screening, prostate cancer screening, knee/hip replacement surgery, cataract surgery, and surgery for lower back pain. Drs.Couper and Zikmund-Fisher seek to clarify how details of patients' decision-making processes might vary across a variety of conditions.

A study by CBSSM researcher Michael Volk, MD, and former CBSSM Director Peter Ubel, MD, has found that the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) organ allocation system has changed how high-risk organs are used--patients lower on the waiting list are receiving more high-risk or poor-quality organs, which has reduced post-transplant survival rates.  Dr. Volk and his colleagues are interested in finding ways to provide better decision making tools for patients who need organ transplants.
To read more about this study, please visit http://www2.med.umich.edu/prmc/media/newsroom/details.cfm?ID=807
Their findings are published in the November issue of Gastroenterology (Vol. 135, No. 5)

is the title of a project assessing the impact of different features of a web-based decision aid to improve patient decision making for asymptomatic carotid disease. This project was recently funded by the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making. Ethan A. Halm, MD, MPH (Univerity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center) will be working with CBSSM's Brian Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, on this research that will compare two decision aids related to surgery to prevent stroke.  

Teach-Out Course: Reach Out and RELATE: Communicating and Understanding Scientific Research

Fri, May 05, 2017, 8:00am
Location: 
Online

About this course
Everyone - non-scientists and scientists alike - has some form of expertise, but communicating across a gap in knowledge or experience is challenging. In this Teach-Out, we address this challenge by helping participants to develop core communication skills and more effectively communicate with one another. For more information or to enroll, click here.

What you'll learn

  • Understand why science communication is both important and challenging
  • Develop strategies to effectively bridge communications between public audiences and scientific researchers
  • Understand expert perspectives on different areas of public engagement with science
  • Shape a compelling, message-focused STEM narrative for a specific audience
  • Discuss important issues in science communication with others


Meet the instructors

Elyse L. Aurbach PhD
Co-Founder and Co-Director of RELATE

Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher PhD
Associate Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education

Brandon Patterson MS
Co-Director of RELATE

Katherine E. Prater PhD
Co-Founder and Co-Director of RELATE
 

Program in Clinical Ethics

The Program in Clinical Ethics within the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) represents an expansion of existing services designed to promote a culture of patient-centered excellence by developing a comprehensive set of ethics-related activities.  The aims of this program are to: liaise with and provide support to the adult and pediatrics ethics committees; streamline clinical ethics consultation; assist with ethics-related policy development on a regular and proactive basis; organize and administer structured educational programs in clinical ethics; and coordinate empiric research with relevance to clinical ethics within CBSSM.

Background
The Program in Clinical Ethics within CBSSM represents an expansion of existing services designed to promote a culture of patient-centered excellence by developing a comprehensive set of ethics-related activities.  The aims of this program are to: liaise with and provide support to the adult and pediatrics ethics committees; streamline clinical ethics consultation; assist with ethics-related policy development on a regular and proactive basis; organize and administer structured educational programs in clinical ethics; and coordinate empiric research with relevance to clinical ethics within CBSSM.

Program Organization
The Program in Clinical Ethics is co-directed by the chairs of the adult and pediatric ethics committees and consultation services, Christian J. Vercler, MD, MA and Andrew G. Shuman, MD. A dedicated clinician ethicist manages the program on a daily basis.  A cadre of eight faculty ethicists rotate on service throughout the year and work closely with the clinician ethicist.  Trainees and students rotate as well.  Dedicated administrative support will be organized through CBSSM.

Clinical Ethics Consultation Service
The Clinical Ethics Program offers adult and pediatric ethics consultation services across UMHS, and are available 24/7/365.  More information about the adult and pediatric ethics committees and consultation services can be found on the Adult Ethics Committee and Pediatrics Ethics Committee web pages.

Preventative Ethics
The concept of preventative ethics is critical in anticipating, navigating and mitigating potential conflicts and tensions before they become true ethical dilemmas or crises, and necessitate formal consults.   This model facilitates awareness and proactive decision-making on the part of patients, families, trainees and staff, and creates a more visible presence for ethics in the health system.  The Program in Clinical Ethics offers regular preventative ethics rounds in a variety of care settings across UMHS.

Educational Program
Medical ethics is an integral component of contemporary education for all clinicians. There is a vibrant program for longitudinal ethics education within the medical school, and a more intensive curriculum as part of its path of excellence program.  The Program in Clinical Ethics provides a robust program for longitudinal education and awareness of clinical ethics for UMHS staff and trainees. 


People
Christian J. Vercler, MD MA
Andrew G. Shuman, MD
[more to be named soon!]

Contacts
Co-Directors of the Program in Clinical Ethics: Christian J. Vercler, MD, MA & Andrew G. Shuman, MD
Administrative contact: Valerie Kahn – valkahn@med.umich.edu  734-615-5371

Research Ethics

Research Ethics Service

The Research Ethics Service, led by Kayte Spector-Bagdady, JD, MBioethics and Raymond De Vries, PhD within the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, aims to enable a culture of normative, empirical, and educational inquiry to serve as the ethical backbone of research at Michigan Medicine. Its three areas of focus include:


1. Education: providing instruction on Research Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research;
2. Consultation: offering a consulting service for colleagues with questions about the ethical conduct of research; 
3. Research: using a variety of methods to study issues in Research Ethics.


Research Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research Education

Coursework and independent projects into research ethics and the responsible conduct of research may be available upon request. Current courses include the Responsible Conduct of Research for K Awardees (RCR4K) Implementation Package offered through the Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR) and Legal Rules and Ethical Issues for Clinical Research (HMP 540) through the Clinical Research Design and Statistic Analysis Masters Program at the UM School of Public Health.


Research Ethics Consultation Service

Personalized Research Ethics Consultation may be available during normal business hours for investigators across Michigan Medicine designing or conducting their own research protocols. For further information or to request a consultation please contact kaytesb@med.umich.edu.


Mixed Methods Research into Human Subjects Research Ethics

The Program in Research Ethics also supports a vibrant mixed-methods empirical program for research on human subjects research ethics.

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