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The 2012 CBSSM Research Colloquium took place on Thursday, May 10, and was attended by over 130 people.  This year's colloquium focused on research around medical decision making, and featured presentations by numerous faculty, fellows, and students.  In addition, the CBSSM Research Colloquium featured the annual Bishop Lecture in Bioethics as its keynote address.  Drs. Jerome Groopman and Pamela Hartzband of Harvard Medical School jointly presented the Bishop Lecture with a talk entitled, "When Experts Disagree: The Art of Medical Decision Making."  For more information about the event and to view photos and a video of the Bishop Lecture, click here.

CBSSM researcher Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, PhD, and collaborator Mick Couper, PhD, from the UM Institute for Social Research spoke to the Medical Editors Meeting of the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Drs. Couper and Zikmund-Fisher reported on "Methods and Early Results from the National Survey of Medical Decisions." This pioneering survey reveals surprising information about the epidemiology of ten common medical decisions that are made by older Americans. Discussion of the presentation was lively!

The Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making, which funded this CBSSM research, is a nonprofit organization dedicated to assuring that people understand their choices and have the information they need to make sound decisions affecting their health and well being.
Learn more at http://www.fimdm.org

CBSSM Seminar: Jacob Solomon, PhD

Thu, November 19, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Jacob Solomon, PhD


CBSSM Postodoctoral Fellow

Title:

Designing the information cockpit: The impact of customizable algorithms on computer-supported decision making

Abstract:

Intelligent systems that provide decision support necessitate interaction between a human decision maker and powerful yet complex and often opaque algorithms. I will discuss my research on end-user control of these algorithms and show that designing highly customizable decision aids can make it difficult for decision makers to identify when the system is giving poor advice.

CBSSM Seminar: Kayte Spector-Bagdady, JD

Wed, December 09, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room B004E

Kayte Spector-Bagdady, JD


CBSSM Postdoctoral Fellow

From the Guatemala STD Experiments to the NPRM for Revisions to the Common Rule: Why We Still Don’t Have Human Subjects Research Ethics Right

While much has been made of scandals, and academics zealously deliberate nuances, we still find ourselves revisiting the most basic of human subjects research ethics questions: What is a research subject? What is informed consent? This talk will address this ongoing debate but also the less often asked question of why—what are the structural pressures that bring us time and again to step one and is human subjects research ethics a zero sum game?

CBSSM Seminar: Michael D. Fetters, MD, MPH, MA

Thu, April 14, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC Building 16, Conference Rm 266C

Michael D. Fetters, M.D., M.P.H., M.A.
Professor, University of Michigan
Co-Director, Michigan Mixed Methods Research and Scholarship Program
Director, Japanese Family Health Program
Co-Editor, Journal of Mixed Methods Research

"Mixed methods research approaches for empirical medical ethics”

Abstract: Mixed methods research involves the integration of qualitative and quantitative methodology. The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate potential applications of mixed methods methodology for conducting empirical medical ethics research.

CBSSM Seminar: Reshma Jagsi, MD, PhD

Wed, May 18, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Reshma Jagsi, MD, PhD
Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology

"Stewardship and Value:  Are we choosing wisely in managing breast cancer?"

Abstract: This lecture will begin with a brief discussion of the moral foundations of physicians' obligations to serve society, in addition to the patients they directly serve.  It will then consider analogies between financial stewardship and antibiotic stewardship, and it will conclude by focusing on several examples of opportunities for better physician stewardship in breast cancer, including slow uptake of short courses of breast radiation and rapid increases in the use of bilateral mastectomy for unilateral disease.

CBSSM Seminar: Susan Goold & Zachary Rowe (DECIDERS Project)

Thu, December 15, 2016, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Susan Goold, MD, MHSA, MA
Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School
Professor of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health

Zachary Rowe
Executive Director of Friends of Parkside (FOP)

Title:  Evaluation of CHAT as a tool for engaging communities in priority setting

Abstract:  Engaging minority and underserved communities in setting research priorities could make the scientific research agenda more equitable and more responsive to their needs.  This presentation evaluates CHAT, a serious game, to prioritize health research based on feedback from 47 focus groups (N=519) across Michigan.

CBSSM Seminar: Jan Van den Bulck, PhD

Tue, November 28, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Jan Van den Bulck, PhD
Professor, Communication Studies

Topic:
"Are the media (re-)defining how we interact with each other and with the world?

We know everything there is to know about people we have never even met. Through social media, we follow their every move. We even know their pets. Our media use interferes with healthy sleep, family meals, or even our work. Our children need levels of self-control to manage distractions that threaten their schoolwork. Or do they?"

CBSSM Seminar: Jeff Kullgren, MD, MS, MPH

Wed, October 19, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC Building 16, Conference Rm 266C

Jeff Kullgren, MD, MS, MPH
Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine

Consumer Behaviors among Americans in High-Deductible Health Plans 
More than 1 in 3 Americans with private health insurance now face high out-of-pocket expenditures for their care because they are enrolled in high-deductible health plans (HDHPs), which have annual deductibles of at least $1,300 for an individual or $2,600 for a family before most services are covered.  Though it is well known that HDHPs lead patients to use fewer health services, what is less known is the extent to which Americans who are enrolled in HDHPs are currently using strategies to optimize the value of their out-of-pocket health care spending such as (1) budgeting for necessary care, (2) accessing tools to select providers and facilities based on their prices and quality, (3) engaging clinicians in shared decision making which considers cost of care, and (4) negotiating prices for services.  Such strategies could be particularly helpful for people living with chronic conditions, who are even more likely to delay or forego necessary care when enrolled in an HDHP.  In this seminar we will examine these issues and review preliminary results from a recent national survey of US adults enrolled in HDHPs that aimed to determine how often these strategies are being utilized and how helpful patients have found them to be, which patients choose to use or not use these strategies and why, and identify opportunities for policymakers, health plans, and employers to better support the growing number of Americans enrolled in HDHPs.

CBSSM Seminar: Timothy R. B. Johnson, M.D.

Tue, October 03, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 10, G065

Timothy R. B. Johnson, M.D.
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Bates Professor of the Diseases of Women and Children
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Women’s Studies
Research Professor, CHGD

Title: Global Health Ethics and Reproductive Justice: Breadth and Depth in CBSSM

Global Health Ethics and Reproductive Justice (in this instance sexual rights and gender equity, specifically gender and sexual harassment/assault in Academic Medical Centers) appear to be areas where a number of CBSSM members have interest, expertise and are working inter-disciplinarily in domains that will differentiate CBSSM nationally and internationally. Could and should these develop into CBSSM thematic interests? Whatever the case, they will remain topics of significant interest across CBSSM and are worthy of broad discussion and  understanding.

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