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Funded by the National Institutes of Health

Funding years: 2011-2015

Colorectal cancer has a major impact on Americans, yet its screening rate remains suboptimal. This study aims to improve colorectal cancer screening rate by using an innovative and interactive decision aid that helps patients choose among colorectal cancer screening options. The study will also elucidate how patients and physicians discuss colorectal cancer screening options. for more information visit NIH Reporter.

PI: Masahito Jimbo

Co-I: Sarah Hawley

Scott Kim, Ray De Vries and colleagues have a new article out: "How Important is 'Accuracy' of Surrogate Decision-Making for Research Participation?" published online in PLOS ONE. Click here for full article.

Press Kit

About CBSSM

CBSSM acts at the premier intellectual gathering place of clinicians, social scientists, bioethicists, and all others interested in improving individual and societal health through scholarship and service.

Schedule an Interview

Members of the media interested in interviewing Center members can call the UMHS Public Relations office at 734-764-2220 between the hours 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern Time, or email us directly at cbssm-mgr@umich.edu

Funded by Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (Subcontract)

Investigators from University of Michigan’s Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation (IHPI), in partnership with the Detroit Health Department, the Southfield-Joy Community Development Corporation and five health plans insuring Detroit-based Medicaid and Healthy Michigan enrollees have collaboratively developed an innovative new model for a Community Health Worker-led (CHW) demonstration project in Detroit’s Cody Rouge neighborhood. The demonstration project will evaluate a potentially financially sustainable model targeting neighborhoods with high numbers of high- and under-health care utilizing Medicaid enrollees. The health plans will each deploy one of their CHWs to the project for a 12-month period. After undergoing joint training through the Michigan Community Health Worker Alliance (MICHWA) program and using assessment tools that cover shared domains, the CHWs will proactively reach out to identified beneficiaries to conduct an initial health and social needs assessment, develop an individualized ‘action plan’ with each beneficiary, work with neighborhood-based organizations to address each enrollee’s unique needs, and provide follow-up support as needed. CHWs will work closely with local organizations both to meet program participants’ needs and to strengthen community capacity to bridge gaps between healthcare services and community-level social determinants of health. The Detroit Health Department will provide office space for the CHWs to meet weekly in a neighborhood facility and provide ongoing booster support and mentorship. UM investigators will evaluate the program in a parallel, two-armed, randomized controlled pragmatic trial. We will evaluate effect on health care utilization among high-utilizing participants and zero-utilizing participants (ED visits, hospitalizations, primary care use) and health care costs at 6- and 12-months and compared to eligible individuals not yet enrolled in the project, on key patient-centered outcomes, and project costs, return on investment, and barriers and facilitators to adoption, implementation, maintenance, and potential spread.

PI: Michele Heisler, MD, MPA

CBSSM Co-I: H. Myra Kim, ScD

CBSSM Seminar: Jan Van den Bulck, PhD

Tue, November 28, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Jan Van den Bulck, PhD
Professor, Communication Studies

Topic:
"Are the media (re-)defining how we interact with each other and with the world?

We know everything there is to know about people we have never even met. Through social media, we follow their every move. We even know their pets. Our media use interferes with healthy sleep, family meals, or even our work. Our children need levels of self-control to manage distractions that threaten their schoolwork. Or do they?"

Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher, PhD

Associate Director

Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, as well as a Research Associate Professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School. He has been part of CBSSM and its precursors at U-M since 2002 and acts as CBSSM Associate Director.

Last Name: 
Zikmund-Fisher
Press Coverage: 
Thu, November 23, 2017

Reshma Jagsi, Director of CBSSM, was recently quoted for the Reuters Health article, "Female doctors adjust lives to accommodate home."

Research Topics: 

Dr. Naomi Laventhal has received the Holden Research Fund Award for her research entitled, "Off-label use of therapeutic hypothermia in the newborn intensive care units: A survey of U.S. neonatologists."

Check out Sarah Hawley's IHPI profile as this month's featured member here.

Patients’ Attitudes toward Considering Cost When Making Medical Decisions (Oct-13)

Imagine that for the last three months, you have had a very bad headache – the worst in your life – that won’t go away, even when you take aspirin. In addition to the headache you have also been feeling dizzy. Your doctor tells you that you need to get a brain scan to test whether the headache is being caused by something serious. There are two possible scans you can get: a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or a Computerized Axial Tomography (CT) scan.  The MRI provides a slightly more detailed picture and might find something that the CT misses, such as an extremely uncommon blood vessel problem, but nearly all problems serious enough to need treatment would be seen on either the MRI or the CT.

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