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Sarah Hawley, PhD, MPH

Faculty

Dr. Sarah T. Hawley is a Professor in the Division of General Medicine at the University of Michigan and a Research Investigator at the Ann Arbor VA Center of Excellence in Health Services Research & Development. She holds a PhD in health services research from the University of North Carolina and an MPH from Yale University Department of Public Health. Her primary research is in decision making related to cancer prevention and control, particularly among racial/ethnic minority and underserved populations.

Last Name: 
Hawley
Fri, January 05, 2018
A study by CBSSM's Scott Roberts and colleagues about 23andMe customers' reactions to Alzheimer's risk results was recently cited in HeraldNet.
Research Topics: 

Funded by National Science Foundation.

Funding Years: 2015-2017.


When thinking about infectious diseases and making decisions about how to protect themselves, people often overreact to infectious diseases with low risk of infection, such as Ebola, and at other times fail to respond to infectious diseases with higher risk of infection, such as the flu. Both types of responses can lead to negative outcomes such as stress and anxiety, less productivity at work, and inefficient use of healthcare resources (either using too much or too little depending on the disease). We think that one reason that people may exhibit these responses to infectious diseases is that there may be a conflict between their beliefs about their risk and their feelings about their risk. This research will examine areas of misinformation and emotional responses to three infectious diseases: Ebola, the flu, and MERS. After identifying key areas of misinformation and excessive or subdued emotional responses to these three diseases, the research team develops and tests a number of communication strategies that best correct misinformation and resolve conflicts between beliefs and feelings of risk to motivate more appropriate responses to infectious diseases. After determining which strategies are better at doing those things than others, the research team creates a website to display "best-practices" in communicating about infectious diseases.

This research involves conducting a number of web studies to investigate when and for whom cognitive- and affective-based communication strategies work best at modifying cognitions, affect, and behavioral intentions towards pandemic risks. The research uses the theory of "risk-as-feelings". These studies will advance our understanding of risk-as-feelings in a number of ways. First, the research team examines the frequency of simultaneous contradictory responses (SCRs) - when beliefs and feelings of risk conflict - at least with these three infectious diseases. Second, the research team tests for the existence of simultaneous contradictory affective responses. Third, the team then assesses the relative influence of cognitive and affective sources of information on cognitions, affective reactions, and behavioral intentions, as well as in the possible resolution of SCRs. Fourth, the application of risk-as-feelings to determine optimal communication strategies about these infectious diseases should serve as a test-case for the utility of incorporating risk-as-feelings into public health theories of health behavior and communication. Fifth, due to its foundation in the theory of risk-as-feelings, insights gleaned from the current studies should help shape the way information is communicated about other public health issues beyond these disease. And finally, the research tests whether resolving SCRs is key to inducing appropriate responses to pandemic risks or whether improving knowledge, acknowledging fears, and/or improving feelings of efficacy, is sufficient to improve responses, as would be predicted by standard health behavior theories from public health.

PI(s): Brian Zikmund-Fisher

PIHCD Working Group

Thu, January 08, 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
TBD

Jake Seagull will be speaking about prostate cancer shared decision making.

PIHCD: Tanner Caverly

Thu, February 12, 2015, 4:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Tanner Caverly will be presenting on a decision tool about screening for lung cancer.

PIHCD: Geoff Barnes

Thu, September 24, 2015, 2:00pm
Location: 
B003E NCRC Building 16

Geoff Barnes will present on analysis from a project about bridging anticoagulation decision making.

PIHCD: Michelle Moniz

Thu, October 22, 2015, 3:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Michelle Moniz will be presenting a Specific Aims page for an NICHD K23 application about postpartum contraceptive decision-making.

Funded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Funding Years: 2015-2016

The researchers will examine the extent to which consumers who are in high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) engage in behaviors that help them optimize value. Employing a nationally representative survey, the researchers will explore: (1) how often and in what situations consumers engage in key value-promoting behaviors such as budgeting for health services, choosing settings of care based on price and/or quality, engaging in shared decision-making with providers that considers cost, and negotiating prices for services; (2) which consumers are most likely to engage in these behaviors; (3) which behaviors consumers find most beneficial in maximizing the value of their out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditures; (4) what are the facilitators of and barriers to consumers’ engagement in value-promoting behaviors; and (5) what are consumers’ attitudes and intentions towards engaging in value-promoting consumer behaviors in specific clinical situations. The goal of this project is to inform policymakers, payers, health systems, providers and consumers about the frequency and perceived effects of value-promoting consumer behaviors in HDHPs.

PI(s): Jeffrey Kullgren

Co-I(s): Angela Fagerlin, Helen Levy, A. Mark Fendrick

Funded by Bristol Meyers Squibb/Pfizer

Funding years; 2014-2015


Co-PI: Geoffrey Barnes

Funded by Christiana Care Health System

Funding Years: 2013-2015


The purpose of this study is to assess in a pilot randomized controlled trial the following PICOT question: In parents facing extreme premature delivery, does the use of an existing validated visual decision aid as compared to standard counseling, reduce the primary outcome of parental decisional conflict? Furthermore, is such a decision aid understood and applicable across differing populations of different ethnic backgrounds and social classes?

PI(s): Naomi Laventhal

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