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Save the date: Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 4:00-5:30 pm, Ford Auditorium, UM Hospital.

Laura Roberts, MD, Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine, will give the Raymond W. Waggoner, MD, Lecture on Ethics & Values in Medicine.  She will also speak at the Psychiatry Department Grand Rounds Wednesday, November 9, 10:30-12:00, Rachel Upjohn Bldg, 4250 Plymouth Road.

The third annual community-engaged research workshop, "Communication in Community-Engaged Research" is scheduled for October 27-28, 2011 and co-sponsored by the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics (JERHRE), the Hobby Center for Public Policy, the University of Houston, Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R), and the Community-Campus Partnerships for Health. 

For more information, see the conference announcement.   

Kathryn Moseley and Ed Goldman are co-authors on an NEJM Sounding Board article, “No Appointment Necessary? Ethical Challenges in Treating Friends and Family.” Full author list includes Katherine J. Gold, M.D., M.S.W., Edward B. Goldman, J.D., Leslie H. Kamil, J.D., Sarah Walton, M.D., Tommy G. Burdette, M.Div., and Kathryn L. Moseley, M.D., M.P.H. The link to the article can be found here.

CBSSM Co-Director Raymond De Vries presented at the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues on Sept. 2 about how to insure that the public has a voice in creating bioethics policies.

The September 2nd Presidential Commission meeting in Washington, DC, including Dr. De Vries's talk on the topic of "Fostering and Measuring Success in Ethics and Deliberation", is now available to be viewed online.

Peter A. Ubel, MD

Alumni

Peter Ubel, MD, is a physician and behavioral scientist whose research and writing explores the quirks in human nature that influence people's lives — the mixture of rational and irrational forces that affect health, happiness and the way society functions.

Dr. Ubel is Professor of Marketing and Public Policy at Duke University. He was Professor of Medicine and Psychology at the University of Michigan, where he taught from 2000 to 2010, and from 2005-2010, served as the Director of the Center for Behavioral and Decision Sciences in Medicine.

Last Name: 
Ubel

Aaron Scherer, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Aaron Scherer was a CBSSM Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2014-2016. Aaron earned his PhD in Psychology from the University of Iowa and utilizes methodologies from social psychology, social cognition, and neuropsychology to study the causes and consequencdees of biased beliefs. His current research has focused on the causes and consequences of biased beliefs regarding health and politics.

Last Name: 
Scherer

Jacob Solomon, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Jacob Solomon was a CBSSM Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2015-2017.

Jacob Solomon completed a PhD in Media and Information Studies at Michigan State University in 2015. His research is focused on Human-Computer Interaction and Human Factors Engineering where he studies how the design of interactive systems affects users’ behavior. His research merges methods from social sciences with computer and information science to design, build, and evaluate socio-technical systems.

Last Name: 
Solomon

Joseph Colbert, BA

Research Associate

Joseph joined CBSSM as a Research Area Specialist in November 2017. As a project manager, he coordinates the daily operations of Dr. Jeffrey Kullgren’s project “Provider, Patient, and Health System Effects of Provider Commitments to Choose Wisely,” a grant funded research project using novel approaches to reduce the overuse of low-value services in healthcare.

Last Name: 
Colbert

Emily Sippola, BA

Research Associate

Emily joined CBSSM as a Research Associate in 2018 after a circuitous journey in social science research from academia to industry and back. She has worked with mental health research at the Institute for Social Research, medical education and health disparities at UM Medical School’s Global REACH, and spent more than a decade supporting pharmaceutical quantitative and qualitative survey research. Emily works with Dr.

Last Name: 
Sippola

Funded by National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2015-2020

Every day in hospitals across the country, patients with severe stroke and their families are faced with decisions about life-sustaining treatments in the initial hours of admission. These decisions about resuscitation status, invasive treatments, or possible transitions to comfort care are typically made by a surrogate decision- maker due to communication or cognitive deficits in the patient. This surrogate must consider the patient's life goals and values to determine if their loved one would choose on-going intensive treatments where they may survive and yet have long term disabilities, or prioritize comfort and accept the likelihood of an earlier death. Serving as a surrogate decision maker for a patient in the intensive care unit can have long lasting negative consequences. However, almost nothing is known about surrogate decision makers in diverse populations with stroke. Hispanic Americans are now the largest minority group in the US, rapidly growing and aging, with Mexican Americans comprising the largest subgroup. Multiple disparities have been identified in stroke incidence and outcome between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites, particularly in the use of life- sustaining treatments. Minority populations may be particularly vulnerable to inadequate communication about end-of-life issues due to socioeconomic disadvantage, poor health literacy, and lack of provider empathy and health system strategies to improve communication. However, Mexican American culture includes strong values of family support and religiosity that may have a positive influence on discussions about life-sustaining treatment and adapting to stroke-related disabilities. There is currently a critical gap in understanding the perspectives and outcomes of stroke surrogate decision makers, making it impossible to design interventions to help diverse populations of patients and families through this incredibly trying time.

PI(s): Lewis Morgenstern, Darin Zahuranec

Co-I(s): Lynda Lisabeth, Brisa Sanchez

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