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Holly Witteman, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Holly Witteman was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at CBSSM, 2009-2011. She studied mathematics and engineering at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, and worked in research and design in industry for several years before pursuing a Ph.D. in human factors engineering at the University of Toronto, where she was a fellow in Health Care, Technology, and Place, a strategic training initiative that fosters interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars in the humanities and sciences.

Last Name: 
Witteman

Tolu Olorode, MSW, MUP

Alumni

Tolu joined CBSSM in September 2012 as a graduate work study student then transitioned into a full-time Research Area Specialist Associate from August 2015 to May 2017. She received her joint Master’s in Social Work and Urban Planning from the University of Michigan. The bulk of her work at CBSSM includes assisting Dr. Susan Goold on an evaluation of the Healthy Michigan Plan (Michigan’s Medicaid Expansion).

Research Interests: 
Last Name: 
Olorode

Maryn Lewallen, MPH

Research Associate

Maryn joined CBSSM in June 2018. She works with Dr. Susan Goold and community partners to evaluate impacts of Michigan's expanded Medicaid program. She also uses deliberative methods to engage community members in setting priorities for community health.

Maryn received her BA in Russian Literature and Women's Studies from Beloit College and her MPH in Health Behavior and Health Education from the University of Michigan. Prior to joining CBSSM, she worked as a qualitative Research Associate for various projects across the university.

Last Name: 
Lewallen

Alexandra Vinson, PhD

Faculty

Alexandra Vinson, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Learning Health Sciences, Division of Professional Education. She received her PhD in Sociology and Science Studies from the University of California, San Diego. A medical sociologist by training, her research employs qualitative methods to examine how the medical profession adapts to changes in medical knowledge, technology, patient populations, and broader U.S. culture by intentionally reshaping medical education.

Last Name: 
Vinson

Parents' decision-making about medicating infants (Jul-13)

Imagine that you are the parent of a 1-month-old infant. Your infant spits up a lot. Often there is so much spit-up that you are amazed that there is anything left in your infant’s stomach.  After spitting-up, your infant cries a lot. The crying and spitting seems especially bad after eating. But sometimes it seems like she is uncomfortable most of the time. It seems like there is nothing that you can do to stop the crying or to soothe your infant. You are worried that an infant who is this uncomfortable, and that spits up this much, might not be healthy. So, you decided to take your infant to the doctor to be checked.

After listening to your story and examining your infant, your doctor says, “You infant has something called GERD, or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. GERD happens when infants have a weak valve at the entrance to their stomach and, as a result, food and acid from the stomach can travel back up toward the infant’s mouth. When this happens, the infant may spit-up, and the acid in the spit-up may make her uncomfortable, and cause her to cry. Some doctors prescribe a medication that is often used to treat infants with GERD. Most infants grow out of GERD on their own, but medication is an option if you want it. However, studies have shown that this medicine probably doesn’t do anything to help improve symptoms in babies with GERD. This is the same medication that is taken by adults who have bothersome heartburn. This medication is generally considered safe for infants, and rarely causes serious side effects. I’ll give you this prescription and leave it up to you to decide whether or not you want to give it to your infant.”

Fri, August 16, 2013
1 in 5 women don't believe a tailored breast cancer risk assessment, according to a new study published by CBSSM researchers.

The findings were published in Patient Education and Counseling as part of a larger study where women participated in an online program to learn about medications that can reduce their risk of breast cancer. As part of the program, women who were at above-average risk of developing breast cancer received tailored information about their personal breast cancer risk. The risk assessment tool took into account family history and personal health habits, yet nearly 20 percent of women did not believe their breast cancer risk.

The study has also recently been discussed in CBS “Morning Rounds” (go to 1:45 of video clip) and NPR Shots.

Lead author Laura Scherer completed the research while serving as a CBSSM Post-Doctoral Research Fellow. Senior author Angela Fagerlin is the Co-Director of CBSSM and the Director of the CBSSM Post-Doctoral Fellowship Program.

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, September 28, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Carl Schneider, JD -- “Can Informed-Consent Laws Work? Evaluating Compelled Disclosure as a Method of Regulation”

Abstract: The law of informed consent is an example of a form of legal regulation called mandated disclosure.  In such regulation, one party to a transaction is required to give the other party to the transaction information to use in making decisions about the parties’ relationship.  There are hundreds of examples of such legal rules besides medical informed consent. This talk asks how well these rules have worked outside medicine. It concludes that there is little evidence that those rules ever work, explores some of the reasons for this surprising failure, and asks what the failure of mandated disclosure outside medicine tells us about the success of informed-consent laws in medicine.

Fri, July 14, 2017

A study by current and former CBSSM faculty and staff was recently highlighted in Horsetalk (NZ). Angela Fagerlin, Thomas Valley, Aaron Scherer, Megan Knaus, Enny Das, and Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher were co-authors on an international study looking at the impact of flu labels (including "Horse Flu" and "Yarramin Flu") and graphics on risk perceptions and behavioral intentions.

 

CBSSM Seminar: Michael D. Fetters, MD, MPH, MA

Thu, April 14, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC Building 16, Conference Rm 266C

Michael D. Fetters, M.D., M.P.H., M.A.
Professor, University of Michigan
Co-Director, Michigan Mixed Methods Research and Scholarship Program
Director, Japanese Family Health Program
Co-Editor, Journal of Mixed Methods Research

"Mixed methods research approaches for empirical medical ethics”

Abstract: Mixed methods research involves the integration of qualitative and quantitative methodology. The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate potential applications of mixed methods methodology for conducting empirical medical ethics research.

Bioethics Grand Rounds

Wed, June 22, 2016, 12:00pm
Location: 
UH Ford Amphitheater & Lobby

Timothy Johnson, MD

"Ethical global health engagement: the Michigan Women's Health Model"

Millennial learners are experiencing and want to engage in global issues.  As institutions develop opportunities for their students, ethical issues need to be considered.  Transnational, transcultural, and translational issues as well as issues of equity, bilateral gain, economic transparency, academic values and sustainability must be factored into academic institutional partnerships between Western and low income countries.  The Ghana experience will be used to develop the concept of a “Michigan Model”.

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