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Fri, April 10, 2015

Dr. Jagsi was interviewed by MedicalResearch.com, discussing her study which finds many breast cancer patients have an unmet need to discuss genetic testing with their healthcare provider. The study found that 35 percent of women with breast cancer expressed a strong desire for genetic testing, but 43 percent of those women did not have a relevant discussion with a healthcare professional. "By more routinely addressing genetic risk with patients, we can better inform them of their true risk of cancer returning or of developing a new cancer," Dr. Jagsi explains in the interview. "This could potentially alleviate worry and reduce confusion about cancer risk."

Geoffrey Barnes is lead author on study published in the American Journal of Medicine finding new anticoagulants are driving increase in atrial fibrillation treatment and reducing warfarin therapy use.

“The data provides a promising outlook about atrial fibrillation which is known for being undertreated,” says lead author Geoffrey Barnes, M.D., MSc.,  cardiologist at the University of Michigan Health System and researcher at the Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.  “When we don’t treat atrial fibrillation, patients are at risk for stroke. By seeking treatment, patients set themselves up for better outcomes.”

More details can be found here.

CBSSM Seminar: Reshma Jagsi, MD, PhD

Wed, May 18, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Reshma Jagsi, MD, PhD
Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology

"Stewardship and Value:  Are we choosing wisely in managing breast cancer?"

Abstract: This lecture will begin with a brief discussion of the moral foundations of physicians' obligations to serve society, in addition to the patients they directly serve.  It will then consider analogies between financial stewardship and antibiotic stewardship, and it will conclude by focusing on several examples of opportunities for better physician stewardship in breast cancer, including slow uptake of short courses of breast radiation and rapid increases in the use of bilateral mastectomy for unilateral disease.

CBSSM Seminar: Twitter/Social Media

Thu, January 12, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Twitter/Social Media Seminar “How to Promote Your Research, Yourself, and Make Connections using Social Media"

This seminar will be geared to all levels of social media/Twitter familiarity—if you are a newbie OR have an unused/dormant account, OR use it a lot, but want to be more efficient/effective, this seminar is for you! We also welcome experienced users to attend and offer their advice based on their experience!

 

Funded by Society of Family Planning.

Funding Years: 2013-2015.

Reproductive autonomy (RA) means having control over one’s own fertility desires. Identification in a religious community may affect women’s decision-making abilities surrounding family planning. Upadhyay et al. developed a scale consisting of three domains that measure RA as it applies to a woman and her partner: freedom from coercion, communication and decision making. However, little is known about how religious norms influence RA. We aimed to expand the current RA scale to capture religious influences and assess the relationship between RA and unprotected sex among religious women.

 

Funded by National Institutes of Health; National Institute on Aging

 

This is competing continuation proposal for Years 23-28 of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) cooperative agreement, in response to NIA RFA #AG-12-001. We propose to continue core data collection on the steady-state design laid out in the two previous renewal cycles, and collect biomarkers and measures of physical performance in in-person interviews on the rotating half-sample design established in the previous cycle.

PI(s): Sharon Kardia/David Weir

 

Bioethics Grand Rounds - Dr. Michael Jibson

Wed, August 26, 2015, 12:00pm
Location: 
Ford Auditorium

This month's grand rounds features: Michael Jibson, MD, Psychiatry Department speaking about "Psychiatry, Law, and Society: Ethical and Legal Issues in Mental Health"

Lunch provided!

Please join us for a lively discussion of medical ethics. The Bioethics Grand Rounds is co-sponsored by the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, the UMHS Adult and Pediatric Medical Ethics Committee, and the Program of Society and Medicine. This educational session is open to all faculty and staff and members of the public. CME credit is available. 

To meet ACCME requirements for Faculty Planner disclosure and Presenter Disclosure to participants of CME activities at UM, please be advised that the following faculty planner(s)/co-planner(s) and presenter have no personal financial relationships relevant to the activity listed below:
Planners: 

  • Andrew Shuman, MD
  • Christian Vercler, MD

PIHCD: Kevin Kerber and Will Meurer

Thu, November 19, 2015, 2:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Dr. Kevin Kerber and Dr. Will Meurer will be presenting an implementation trial on the topic of diagnosis and treatment of benign positional vertigo in the emergency department. At this meeting, they will be discussing and seeking input regarding plans for the in-person provider training presentation. Part of the intervention is a website to educate and motivate providers. Please review the website prior to the meeting.

To access the educational website please go to www.dizztinct.com and sign up with your uniqname@med.umich.edu  email address and create a password.  After signing up, you'll receive an email with a link to click, in order to activate your account.

If you do not have a med.umich.edu email address, you can still get access by contacting Patty Johnson at johnspat@med.umich.edu

CBSSM Seminar: Roi Livne, PhD

Wed, November 08, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Roi Livne, PhD
Assistant Professor, Sociology

Title: “The New Economy of Dying: Palliative Care, Morality, and Finance in the Age of Excess”

Abstract: This talk argues that over the past 40 years, a new economy has emerged around end-of-life care: one seeking to control, cap, and limit both spending and treatment near the end of life. Built around the expertise of Hospice and Palliative Care, this economy draws on the moral conviction that near the end of life, less treatment (and consequently, less spending) is better. Based on a historical analysis and ethnographic fieldwork in three California hospitals, Livne examines the interactive work that palliative care clinicians do with severely ill patients and their families, trying to facilitate their voluntary consent to pursue less life-sustaining and life-prolonging treatments.

 

Tue, March 27, 2018

U-M/AARP National Poll on Healthy Aging looks at perceived overuse of tests and medicines from the patient’s perspective. Doctors and older patients may disagree more often than either of them suspects about whether a particular medical test or medicine is truly necessary, according to findings from a new poll of Americans over age 50. Improving communication about that mismatch of opinions, the poll suggests, might reduce the use of unneeded scans, screenings, medications and procedures – and health care costs as well.

Jeffrey Kullgren designed the poll and analyzed its results. More details, a brief video, and a link to the full report of the findings and methodology can be found below.

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