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Wed, March 21, 2018

Reshma Jagsi and colleagues recently published an article in the Annals of Internal Medicine regarding the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation's Fund to Retain Clinical Scientists. The goal of this program is to promote greater gender equity in academic medicine.

Research Topics: 

Tanner Caverly recently received a VA HSR&D Career Development Award. Dr. Caverly's award will focus on how to deliver a personalized approach to lung cancer screening that ensures clinical decisions are Veteran-centered and easy to carry out in busy primary care settings.

Fri, September 07, 2018

The almost 5 million people who paid to get their DNA analyzed by the company 23andMe recently found out that their genetic data and related health information might have been sold to a major drug company. That's because 23andMe made a $300 million deal with pharmaceutical giant Glaxo SmithKline, to let it tap that genetic goldmine to help it develop new medicines. If 23andMe customers consented to allow their DNA samples to be used for research when they sent them in, their data can be sold in this way. Millions more people have samples sitting in very different kinds of biobanks: at universities and major teaching hospitals. When patients have surgery, biopsies, or blood draws at hospitals, those specimens may be kept for future research.

A new University of Michigan survey documents public attitudes toward potential commercial use of these samples. The survey reveals what members of the public think about such deals, and what they would want to know if their specimen were part of one, even if it didn't have their name attached. The results are published in a new paper in the August issue of the journal Health Affairs, by a team of U-M bioethics researchers from the Medical School and School of Public Health. Only one in four of the 886 people surveyed nationally said they'd be comfortable with companies getting access to their leftover specimens from a university or hospital biobank.

Kayte Spector-Bagdady, Raymond De Vries, Michele Gornick, Andrew Shuman, Sharon KArdia, and Jodyn Platt are authors on the study.

Research Topics: 

Funded by Harvard & NIH

Funding Years: 2015-2016

This study will use CBPR mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative data collection) to conduct needs assessments and design and evaluate a core family-based intervention. Project activities will emphasize capacity building in two refugee communities resettled in Greater Boston—the Somali Bantu and the Bhutanese—actively engaging refugee community members, community advisory boards, services providers, and other stakeholders. Specific Aims are to: (1) deepen partnerships with the Somali Bantu and Bhutanese communities through co-leadership, capacity-building, and knowledge sharing; (2) collect and apply qualitative data to (a) prepare a needs assessment of mental health in children and adolescents, barriers to care, and services preferences with each target refugee group; (b) develop mental health/psychosocial assessments for refugee caregivers and children; (c) adapt the core components of a family-based strengthening intervention for use with refugees; and (3) conduct an 80-family pilot study to examine acceptability and sustainability of the intervention. Key outcomes will be reduced mental health symptoms among children and adolescents and improvement in caregiver-child relationships

 

PI: Michael Fetters, MD, MPH, MA

Funded by National Institute of Health (NIH), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

SPECIFIC AIMS : 1) Develop a re-organized model of peri-procedural anticoagulation care within six diverse healthcare centers using health systems engineering methods; 2) Develop an implementation strategy for a re- organized model of peri-procedural anticoagulation management of atrial fibrillation patients within a diverse group of healthcare centers; and 3) Perform a single-center pilot study of implementing a re-organized peri- procedural anticoagulation delivery model emphasizing improved intra-organizational provider coordination and communication. RESEARCH PLAN: To accomplish these aims, Dr. Barnes will perform direct observations and semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders to develop and then optimize a work flow model for evidence-based peri- procedural anticoagulation management. He will then use stakeholder semi-structured interviews to develop an implementation strategy for re-organizing per-procedural anticoagulation management. Finally, he will perform a single center pilot study where the re-organized anticoagulation strategy is implemented to assess feasibility, acceptability and efficacy. This study will inform a future multi-center implementation study.

PI: Geoff Barnes, MD, MSc

Funded by NIH - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

The central hypothesis of this study is that early patient CKD education combined with health coach support will improve patient behaviors aligned with blood pressure control by increasing patient knowledge, self-efficacy, and motivation. These in turn will lead to optimal health behaviors and improved blood pressure control. The long-term goal of this research is to develop, test, and disseminate sustainable patient-centric education and coaching support interventions to improve quality and outcomes in CKD. The objective of this proposal is to test the impact of a pilot-tested, provider-delivered patient education tool, followed with health coaching focused on blood pressure control. A cluster-randomized controlled trial will compare outcomes in patients with CKD stages 3-5 between intervention and control groups in primary care settings. Continuous quality improvement and systems methodologies will be used to optimize resource neutrality and identify how to leverage existing technology and resources to support implementation and future dissemination. Involving local partners from a state-wide primary care practice-based research network will support future transferability and uptake into community settings.

PI: Julie Wright Nunes, MD, MPH

Amanda Dillard, PhD, was awarded a $25,000 George Bennett Postdoctoral Grant by the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making. With this funding, Dr. Dillard will conduct surveys to examine whether certain types of patient testimonials have a beneficial influence on knowledge, satisfaction, and interest in shared health care decision making, specifically in the context of a decision aid related to colon cancer screening. She will use social cognitive theory, social comparison theory, and risk processing perspectives to guide her hypotheses about testimonials.

Dr. Dillard’s postdoctoral position at CBSSM was funded by VA Health Services Research and Development, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

A study by CBSSM researcher Michael Volk, MD, and former CBSSM Director Peter Ubel, MD, has found that the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) organ allocation system has changed how high-risk organs are used--patients lower on the waiting list are receiving more high-risk or poor-quality organs, which has reduced post-transplant survival rates.  Dr. Volk and his colleagues are interested in finding ways to provide better decision making tools for patients who need organ transplants.
To read more about this study, please visit http://www2.med.umich.edu/prmc/media/newsroom/details.cfm?ID=807
Their findings are published in the November issue of Gastroenterology (Vol. 135, No. 5)

Valerie Kahn, MPH

Center Manager

Valerie joined CBSSM as the Center Manager in the fall of 2012 after working as a Project Manager at CBSSM since 2009. Valerie continues her work on research projects involving medical decision making and doctor-patient communication. Valerie received her MPH in Health Behavior Health Education from the University of Michigan.

 

 
Last Name: 
Kahn

Holly Witteman, PhD

Alumni

Dr. Holly Witteman was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at CBSSM, 2009-2011. She studied mathematics and engineering at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, and worked in research and design in industry for several years before pursuing a Ph.D. in human factors engineering at the University of Toronto, where she was a fellow in Health Care, Technology, and Place, a strategic training initiative that fosters interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars in the humanities and sciences.

Last Name: 
Witteman

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