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Funded by Society of Family Planning.

Funding Years: 2013-2015.

Reproductive autonomy (RA) means having control over one’s own fertility desires. Identification in a religious community may affect women’s decision-making abilities surrounding family planning. Upadhyay et al. developed a scale consisting of three domains that measure RA as it applies to a woman and her partner: freedom from coercion, communication and decision making. However, little is known about how religious norms influence RA. We aimed to expand the current RA scale to capture religious influences and assess the relationship between RA and unprotected sex among religious women.

 

CBSSM Seminar: Reshma Jagsi, MD, PhD

Wed, May 18, 2016, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Reshma Jagsi, MD, PhD
Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology

"Stewardship and Value:  Are we choosing wisely in managing breast cancer?"

Abstract: This lecture will begin with a brief discussion of the moral foundations of physicians' obligations to serve society, in addition to the patients they directly serve.  It will then consider analogies between financial stewardship and antibiotic stewardship, and it will conclude by focusing on several examples of opportunities for better physician stewardship in breast cancer, including slow uptake of short courses of breast radiation and rapid increases in the use of bilateral mastectomy for unilateral disease.

CBSSM Seminar: Twitter/Social Media

Thu, January 12, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Twitter/Social Media Seminar “How to Promote Your Research, Yourself, and Make Connections using Social Media"

This seminar will be geared to all levels of social media/Twitter familiarity—if you are a newbie OR have an unused/dormant account, OR use it a lot, but want to be more efficient/effective, this seminar is for you! We also welcome experienced users to attend and offer their advice based on their experience!

 

PIHCD: Kevin Kerber and Will Meurer

Thu, November 19, 2015, 2:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16

Dr. Kevin Kerber and Dr. Will Meurer will be presenting an implementation trial on the topic of diagnosis and treatment of benign positional vertigo in the emergency department. At this meeting, they will be discussing and seeking input regarding plans for the in-person provider training presentation. Part of the intervention is a website to educate and motivate providers. Please review the website prior to the meeting.

To access the educational website please go to www.dizztinct.com and sign up with your uniqname@med.umich.edu  email address and create a password.  After signing up, you'll receive an email with a link to click, in order to activate your account.

If you do not have a med.umich.edu email address, you can still get access by contacting Patty Johnson at johnspat@med.umich.edu

CBSSM Seminar: Roi Livne, PhD

Wed, November 08, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 16, Room 266C

Roi Livne, PhD
Assistant Professor, Sociology

Title: “The New Economy of Dying: Palliative Care, Morality, and Finance in the Age of Excess”

Abstract: This talk argues that over the past 40 years, a new economy has emerged around end-of-life care: one seeking to control, cap, and limit both spending and treatment near the end of life. Built around the expertise of Hospice and Palliative Care, this economy draws on the moral conviction that near the end of life, less treatment (and consequently, less spending) is better. Based on a historical analysis and ethnographic fieldwork in three California hospitals, Livne examines the interactive work that palliative care clinicians do with severely ill patients and their families, trying to facilitate their voluntary consent to pursue less life-sustaining and life-prolonging treatments.

 

Tue, March 27, 2018

U-M/AARP National Poll on Healthy Aging looks at perceived overuse of tests and medicines from the patient’s perspective. Doctors and older patients may disagree more often than either of them suspects about whether a particular medical test or medicine is truly necessary, according to findings from a new poll of Americans over age 50. Improving communication about that mismatch of opinions, the poll suggests, might reduce the use of unneeded scans, screenings, medications and procedures – and health care costs as well.

Jeffrey Kullgren designed the poll and analyzed its results. More details, a brief video, and a link to the full report of the findings and methodology can be found below.

Funded  by National Insitutes of Health; National Institute on Aging

Funding Years: 2010-2016

This career development award proposes a program of training, data collection and research to advance knowledge in the area of health literacy and health disparities among the elderly. Specifically, the aims of this project are (1) to understand the relationship between measures health literacy and more general measures of cognition, such as memory and numeracy; (2) to estimate the relationship between health literacy, general cognition and health outcomes in a large and nationally-representative sample of older Americans; (3) to analyze the mechanisms through which health literacy and cognition affect health outcomes; (4) to analyze the role that health literacy plays in determining health disparities across racial, ethnic or socio-economic groups; (5) to explore similarities and differences between the concepts of health literacy and financial literacy, and compare the relationship between literacy and outcomes in both domains.
The research activities will be carried out through a program of primary data collection and secondary data analysis based on the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). The primary data collection consists of a module of questions on health literacy and health knowledge to be collected from a subset of respondents to the 2010 wave of the HRS. Analysis of the data will also be carried out with guidance from an interdisciplinary team of mentors.

PI(s): Kenneth Langa

Co-I(s): David Weir, Helen Levy, Mick Couper

 

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) is a new center in the Medical School, created by the recent merger of the Bioethics Program with the Center for Behavioral and Decision Sciences in Medicine (CBDSM). The new Center represents a unique opportunity for the University of Michigan to integrate bioethics with key social science disciplines and brings together in one entity research, clinical service, and education.  CBSSM is co-directed by Drs. Angela Fagerlin and Scott Kim.  Please explore the website to learn more about this unique and innovative unit.

Kenneth M. Langa, M.D., Ph.D., professor of internal medicine and health management and policy, and research professor at the Institute of Gerontology and Survey Research Center/Institute for Social Research, was recently elected to the 2014 class of new members of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ACSI). ASCI comprises more than 3,000 physician-scientists from all medical specialties who are elected to the society for their outstanding records of scholarly achievement in biomedical research before the age of 50.

Tue, April 08, 2014

Reshma Jagsi’s study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology about financial decline in breast cancer survivors has been cited by various health media outlets, including Bio-Medicine, Health News Digest, and various other outlets. The study found that after receiving treatment, a quarter of breast cancer survivors were found to be worse off financially. 

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