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2015 Bishop Lecture featuring Lawrence O. Gostin, J.D., LL.D. (Hon.)

Tue, March 17, 2015, 11:00am
Location: 
Founders Room, Alumni Center, 200 Fletcher St., Ann Arbor, MI

Bishop Lecture in Bioethics: "Law, Ethics, and Public Health in the Vaccination Debates: Politics of the Measles Outbreak" (Keynote Address for the 2015 CBSSM Research Colloquium)

Abstract: The measles outbreak of early 2015 is symptomatic of a larger societal problem–the growing number of parents who decide against vaccinating their children. This failure is causing the resurgence of childhood diseases once eliminated from the United States.
falseThis presentation explores the legal and ethical landscape of vaccine exemptions. While all states require childhood vaccinations, they differ significantly in the types of religious and/or philosophical exemptions permitted, the rigor of the application process, and available review mechanisms. States with relaxed exemption policies disproportionately experience more outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease.

Vaccine exemptions are an illustration of the “tragedy of the commons,” in which parents choose not to vaccinate their children, relying on the fact that other parents will vaccinate their children, thus providing community immunity. However, the net result of many individual decisions not to vaccinate is the collapse of herd immunity and thus an upsurge in preventable disease and death.
The failure to vaccinate puts others at risk, thus violating an important ethical principle. However, punishing individual parents could entrench political opposition to vaccine policy. The most ethical and effective solution is for state legislatures to tighten vaccination laws, making it more difficult to obtain non-medical exemptions.

Lawrence O. Gostin, J.D., LL.D. (Hon.) is University Professor, Georgetown University’s highest academic rank conferred by the University President. Prof. Gostin directs the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law and is the Founding O’Neill Chair in Global Health Law. He is Professor of Medicine at Georgetown University, Professor of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University, and Director of the Center for Law & the Public’s Health at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities. Prof. Gostin is also the Director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Public Health Law & Human Rights.

  • Click here for the video recording of the 2015 Bishop Lecture.

Beth Tarini and Scott Roberts spoke at the Michigan State Medical Society’s 17th Annual Conference on Bioethics, "Putting the Me in Medicine: The Ethics of Personalized Medical Care"

For more information on the conference, you can visit its website here.

Fri, February 28, 2014

Drs. Scott Kim and Franklin Miller propose an integrated consent model for pragmatic trials in a recent NEJM Health Law, Ethics, and Human Rights article. 

Research Topics: 

Dr. Kathryn Moseley has received the Pediatric Health Disparities Award from the UM Department of Pediatrics. The award confers $20,000 of intramural funding towards her project titled “Understand Disparities in Ethics Consultation.”

CBSSM Seminar: Lisa Lehmann, MD, PhD, MSc

Fri, June 09, 2017, 3:00pm
Location: 
NCRC, Building 10, G065

Lisa Lehmann, MD, PhD, MSc
Executive Director, National Center for Ethics in Health Care
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

"Moral Distress in Health Care: The Role of Courage and Culture"

Thu, February 26, 2015

Joel Howell is co-author in a paper published in Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, “The heartfelt music of Ludwig van Beethoven.”  The paper analyzes several of Beethoven's compositions for clues of a heart condition some have speculated he had.

“His music may have been both figuratively and physically heartfelt,” says co-author Joel Howell, M.D., Ph.D, a professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School and member of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. “When your heart beats irregularly from heart disease, it does so in some predictable patterns. We think we hear some of those same patterns in his music.”

Goldberger ZD, Whiting SM, Howell JD. The heartfelt music of Ludwig van Beethoven. Perspect Biol Med. 2014 Spring;57(2):285-94. doi: 10.1353/pbm.2014.0013.

Research Topics: 

Interactive Decision

At CBSSM, we perform the basic and applied scientific research that will improve health care policy and practice to benefit patients and their families, health care providers, third-party payers, policy makers, and the general public.  In our "Interactive Decision" web feature, we turn a recent research finding into an interactive decision that a patient or policy maker might face.  Read, decide, click—and see how your answers compare with our respondents.

Impact of the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System on Vaccine Acceptance and Trust (Aug-17)

Patient understanding of blood test results (Feb-17)

Attitudes toward Return of Secondary Results in Genomic Sequencing (Sep-16)

Moral concerns and the willingness to donate to a research biobank (Jun-16)

Liver Transplant Organ Quality Decision Aid: Would you consider a less than perfect liver? (Jan-16)

Blocks, Ovals, or People Icons in Icon Array Risk Graphics? (Sept-15)

Getting ahead of illness: using metaphors to influence medical decision making (May-15)

 

 

Thu, February 01, 2018

Breast cancer patients face complex decisions about their treatment. Sarah Hawley, Reshma Jagsi, and colleagues developed an interactive online tool to help patients understand their treatment options. In a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, they found that patients using the interactive tool had higher knowledge and felt more informed about options and felt better prepared to make a treatment choice.

Funded by

Funding Years: 2016-2019

This project will examine behavioral economic strategies for decreasing the use of low-value clinical services as listed in the Choose Wisely campaign. The proposed intervention, Committing to Choose Wisely (CCW), will ask clinicians to commit to avoid low-value services and provide resources to support adherence to this commitment. The intervention, which extends across two large health systems, will generate quantitative data from clinical automated data and focused medical record review data to examine rates of order before and after the intervention, as well as qualitative data from surveys and semi-structured interviews of both clinicians and patients to determine the effects of the intervention on their decision-making and experiences.

PI(s): Jeffrey Kullgren

Co-I(s): Eve Kerr

Thu, December 08, 2011

The Risk Evaluation and Education for Alzheimer's disease Study (REVEAL) is a series of clinical trials taking place at U-M's School of Public Health, along with other sites including Harvard University, Howard University, and the University of Pennsylvania. An audio interview with Dr. J. Scott Roberts can be found in the press release.

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