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PIHCD: Zach Landis-Lewis

Thu, November 03, 2016, 4:00pm
Location: 
B004E NCRC Building 16
Zach Landis-Lewis will be presenting on a novel system for communication strategy planning in clinical advice messaging for healthcare professionals.

Stephanie Kukora won a Faculty Award for Clinical Investigation/Health Services Research at the 26th Annual Pediatric Research Symposium for her work on prenatal counseling: Prognostic Failure and Decisional Mismatch in Antenatal Neonatology Consultation.

Reshma Jagsi was recently elected to the Board of Directors for the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). Congratulations!

Research Topics: 

Michele Gornick is a co-author of the new Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) Genomic Report Toolkit; A guide to genomic test results for non-genetics providers. Check it out here!

Research Topics: 

CBSSM Seminar: Sarah Hawley, PhD, MPH

Thu, April 13, 2017, 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
NCRC Building 16, Conference Rm 266C

Sarah Hawley, PhD, MPH
Professor, Internal Medicine
Research Investigator, Ann Arbor VA Center for Clinical Management Research

Dr. Michele Heisler is one of seven faculty members honored with the 2018 Distinguished Clinical and Translational Research Mentor Award. Congratulations!

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CBSSM Seminar: Sameer Saini, MD

Tue, March 19, 2019, 3:00pm
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Location: 
NCRC16-266C

Sameer Saini, MD
Associate Professor Of Internal Medicine, University Of Michigan Medical School And Research Scientist, United States Department Of Veterans Affairs (VA) Center For Clinical Management Research

Funded by Health and Human Services, Department of-National Institutes of Health

Funding Years: 2013 - 2015.

With the aging of society and restructuring of families, it is increasingly important to understand how individuals become disabled. New disability is associated with increased mortality, substantial increases in medical costs (often borne by public payers), and a heavy burden on families and caregivers. While the disablement process?as theorized by Verburgge & Jette and their successors?has traditionally been seen as chronic and gradual, there is increasing recognition that acute events play a critical role in disability. Medical illnesses are not the only potentially disabling events. NIA & NINR recently posted PA-11-265, calling for ?Social and Behavioral Research on the Elderly in Disasters? in recognition that natural disasters are common, but we know little about their impact on health and disability. The National Research Council?s Committee on Population published a report in 2009 documenting not only our ignorance in this area, but, importantly, the potential value of studying disasters to understand fundamental processes in disability and health.
Our long-term research agenda is (a) to test the hypothesis that natural disasters cause enduring morbidity for survivors that is not fully addressed by existing health and welfare programs, and (b) to discover remediable mechanisms that generate that enduring morbidity. Here we propose a nationwide test of the association of living in a disaster area with individuals? long-term disability and health care use. To perform this test, we will combine the unique longitudinal resources of over 16,000 respondents in the linked Health and Retirement Study (HRS) / Medicare files with a newly constructed mapping of all FEMA disaster declarations between 1998 and 2012. We will address key gaps in the existing literature of detailed single-disaster studies with a generalizable perspective across time and space via these Specific Aims:
AIM 1: Quantify the association between the extent of a disaster ? measured as the repair cost to public infrastructure and increases in level of disability among survivors. We will follow respondents for an average of 5 years after the disaster. AIM 2: Quantify the association between the extent of a disaster and increases in the likelihood of hospitalization among survivors. AIM 3: Test the hypothesis that increases in level of disability and likelihood of hospitalization after disasters are worse for those living in counties with higher levels of poverty.
This proposal is specifically responsive to PA-11-265. This proposal is innovative because long-term effects of disasters, particularly for vulnerable older Americans, have been systematically neglected in previous research. It is significant because it will address the public health consequences of a relatively common but understudied exposure. Further, a key contribution of this R21 will be to evaluate the feasibility of the National Research Council conjecture that natural disasters can be studied as exogenous shocks to the environment, and that we can thereby test and elaborate usually endogenous mechanisms in the development of disability.

PI(s): Theodore Iwashyna

Co-I(s): Kenneth Langa, Yun Li, Anne Sales

CBSSM is sponsoring a talk by Dr. Zachary Schrag, Associate Professor of History at George Mason University and author of "Ethical Imperialism: Institutional Review Boards and the Social Sciences."  The talk will take place on Wednesday, February 1, 3-5 pm, at Palmer Commons (Great Lakes Central) and will be followed by a panel discussion featuring UM faculty Cleo Caldwell, Carl Schneider, and Alford Young, Jr.  The talk is titled, "Ethical Imperialism: The Case Against IRB Review of the Social Sciences." 

Bioethics Grand Rounds with Jeffrey Punch, MD

Wed, September 24, 2014, 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Ford Auditorium

Grand Rounds

Box Lunches will be provided courtesy of the Center For Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine.

This month's grand rounds features Jeffrey Punch, MD.

Please join us for a lively discussion of medical ethics. The Bioethics Grand Rounds is sponsored by the UMHS Adult Medical Ethics Committee and the Program of Society and Medicine. This educational session is open to all faculty and staff and members of the public. CME and CEU credit is available.

 

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